Loading…

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Poster Session [clear filter]
Thursday, November 3
 

6:00pm

A Tale of Two Liaison Programs: University of Central Florida Libraries & Louisiana State University Libraries Partnering for Subject Librarian Excellence
Are you considering establishing a new or re-invigorated Subject Liaison program in your library but don't know how to begin? Why not partner with an established liaison program at another library?

In spring 2015, key public service managers at Louisiana State University Libraries visited University of Central Florida Libraries to learn about UCF's three-year-old reimagined Subject Liaison program.  LSU managers liked what they saw at UCF and returned home with a to-do list that included: working with their Collection Development Department to fine-tune academic program assignments for LSU liaisons; creating a liaison training program that focused on academic program profiling, faculty profiling, curriculum mapping, curriculum integrated instruction, and increased  liaison visibility and accessibility; proactive outreach to faculty and students to market library services and resources.

Sample liaison training documents, collegial advice, and progress reports traveled back and forth between UCF and LSU throughout summer and fall 2015, leading to the UCF- RIS Head traveling to LSU in January 2016 for face-to-face training sessions with LSU Liaisons. Fast forward to fall 2016 and now LSU liaisons are participating in bi-weekly training meetings that incorporate topics from curriculum mapping to licensing of electronic databases.
 
Public Service heads from UCF and LSU will discuss how their liaison programs are the same and how they differ; what the challenges are in their current programs and what the future may hold. Lessons learned by UCF and LSU will provide insight for other academic libraries wishing to create liaison programs designed to support student and faculty success at their own institutions. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and share ideas from their own liaison program perspectives. After participating in this program, attendees will be able to develop winning liaison program strategies for their own institution.

This poster is co-authored by Lois Kuyper-Rushing, Associate Dean for Public Services at Louisiana State University, who was unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head of Research & Information Services, University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). Barbara was an Invited... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Against the Numbers: Usage Statistics and Critical Library Instruction
Librarians may not typically consider consulting usage statistics when preparing for an instructional session. However, doing so may allow them to take a critical approach to instruction and faculty collaborations. Usage statistics, though imperfect, allow librarians to pinpoint underutilized electronic resources and, when combined with qualitative data, may help librarians determine what subject-specific resources are overlooked by students. Learn how librarians may partner with faculty to proactively promote library resources through instructional sessions, instructional tools, and assignment design. Such collaborations may improve use of library resources and encourage students to incorporate marginalized resources, works, and voices into their course work.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Binder

Amanda Binder

Social Sciences and History Librarian, UNC Charlotte
KY

Karna Younger

Faculty Engagement Librarian, University of Kansas


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

An Electronic Resources Workflow is Worth a Thousand Words
The processes involved in managing electronic resources are complex. They are becoming even more so with the addition of streaming media, DDA, evidence-based subscriptions, weeding, and unanticipated changes. Rowan University's electronic resources group recently documented its electronic resource management workflows in order to a) communicate complex processes to a diverse group of library stakeholders such as reference and instruction librarians, collection development professionals, acquisitions and technology and systems staff; b) provide guidelines to train new employees; and c) establish a record of current processes, for future reference, evaluation, and revision of workflows. This poster session shows how one academic library has customized workflows to accommodate the needs of its users, and how sharing these workflows has positively contributed to the library.

This poster was co-authored by Lauren Orner, Electronic Resources and Serials Program Assistant, Rowan University, who was unable to attend the conference. 

Speakers
avatar for Christine Davidian

Christine Davidian

Electronic Resources & Serials Librarian, Rowan University


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

An Exploration of Bibliometric Network Visualizations and their Role in the Library
Visualizations based on bibliometric data can be used to map the the output of a faculty, department, or institution's impact and their collaborations with one another. As metrics of impact become more important, especially as grant funding agencies mandate the measurement of research impact and other similar outcomes, libraries and librarians face an opportune moment to develop services, skills, and relationships with university faculty and administrators using bibliometrics and visualizations.

This poster will demonstrate how North Carolina State University (NCSU) has recently developed capabilities in bibliometric network visualizations. Librarians at NCSU have worked with faculty and administrators to develop network graphs of scholarly output and collaboration of departments and institutes on campus. Some of the uses of the network graphs were to track the development and growth of a grant funded institute at NCSU and to determine the structure of a college's departments.

Attendees will learn how to use bibliometric data gathered from databases such as Web of Science and how to process and visualize this data using open source network visualization software such as Sci2 and Gephi. Different visualizations will also be demonstrated in order to compare and contrast the effectiveness of presenting such complex information. Lastly, attendees will learn how the visualization of bibliometric data can be applied to the context of the library, both in terms of the upskilling of librarians and the relationships built with faculty and administrators from providing this service.

Speakers
JC

James Cheng

NCSU Libraries Lois Madden Todd Fellow, NCSU Libraries


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Consumer Health for College Students
At Michigan State University (MSU), the health of our students is important. College brings up many issues for students such as depression, anxiety and more. According to a subset of results for MSU from the 2014 National College Health Assessment, 84% of students reported feeling overwhelmed at least once in the last year and 28% reported it affected their academic performance. These statistics are on par with national averages. Although many campuses have accessible health services, they are not used to their full potential. One study shows that of students who are diagnosed with depression, only 24% are actively receiving treatment. Presumably, many students are trying to cope with these health issues on their own.

We decided to start a pilot program establishing a small consumer health book collection aimed at issues students are facing. We have found reports of child- or adult-focused consumer health collections but few devoted to college students. We hope to reach students with health information that may go into more depth than they are able to find online. We are placing the books in our browsing collection which is a high profile location and includes popular works of fiction and non-fiction.

To help with choosing materials in subjects of high need, we collaborated with several organizations across the campus, including the health center, the Student Health Advisory Council, and local health education experts. Through this we can position the library as a partner in the wellbeing of our students.

Speakers
avatar for Mari Monosoff-Richards

Mari Monosoff-Richards

Health Sciences Librarian, Michigan State University


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Embracing the Future While Preserving the Past: Libraries Find Common Ground at the Joint Library Facility
It is not a new trend that libraries are being forced to reduce their print collections in order to repurpose space for their students and faculty. Indeed, it has become more the norm than the exception here in the United States. It is not a new trend that more US libraries are sharing facilities to store print materials, but the stability and successful continuity of these collaborations varies widely across the country.

The Joint Library Facility in Bryan, Texas, has been a successful collaboration between Texas A&M University and the University of Texas in Austin since 2013. The first 18,000 square foot warehouse built in 2012 can hold 1 million volumes and is now three-quarters full. A second warehouse is breaking ground just a few feet away to hold another 1 million volumes. The enormous success of this unlikely partnership was built on a strategic plan to hold one copy of each unique item, and allow free Interlibrary Loan services for any Texas library in need. Academic and medical libraries alike have benefitted from this unique common ground. The Texas Medical Center Library is just one of many that secured access to a print collection lost in a library re-design, by partnering with the JLF. Meanwhile, the JLF is acquiring new spaces and new roles in preserving the past while embracing the future.

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Romano

Joanne Romano

Head of Resource Mgmt., Texas Medical Center Library
I enjoy networking with other resource managers, and learning about the similar challenges and solutions to be discovered in managing the collection. If is also interesting to hear what communication channels various managers use to demonstrate to administrators, how the library's... Read More →
avatar for Terrie Smalls-Hall

Terrie Smalls-Hall

Resource Management Assistant, The TMC Library
WV

Wyoma VanDuinkerken

Director, Joint Library Facility, Texas A&M University



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Failure and Success: A Materials Budget Case Study at Connecticut College

This poster session will outline the strategy Connecticut College librarians used in an attempt to secure funds to offset inflationary cost increases for serials and e-resources and the strategy used to eliminate subscriptions when that request for funding was denied. One half of the poster, "Failure," will share the activities and data used to educate the College community about the crisis in the materials budget and to convince budget planners that additional funds were needed to prevent the elimination of resources.

As new funds were not forthcoming, the second half of the poster, "Success," will share the process used for faculty and library staff to determine together which resources would be eliminated and thus ensure the retention of more important titles. The Collections Advisory Task Force, including faculty with a history of heavy library use and librarians, identified $100,000 worth of titles for elimination. The Task Force meetings, though initially contentious, were effective in establishing process and trust, and eventually members agreed on titles for cancellation. The list was presented to the College faculty in May 2016. 

This poster session will be of interest to those who face the same kind of pressure to reduce subscriptions due to flat or decreasing materials budgets. Others will find interesting the strategies to convince campus stakeholders of the problem, and to manage the situation when funding is not approved. We hope viewers will come away with insight to improve their own strategies to secure funding or, alternatively, manage subscription elimination decisions effectively.


Speakers
avatar for Beth Hansen

Beth Hansen

Director of Information Resources, Connecticut College
In my current position as Director, Information Resources and a member of the Information Services Leadership Team, I provide oversight for the libraries' Information Resources Team including collection development, acquisitions, cataloging, serials & e-resources and the Greer Music... Read More →
avatar for W. Lee Hisle

W. Lee Hisle

VP for Information Services and Librarian of the College, Connecticut College
As CIO, I oversee all libraries, instructional technology, administrative systems, networks, and telecommunications at Connecticut College. Past professional activities include service as Chair of the Board of Trustees of LYRASIS, President of the Association of College and Research... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Four Years of E-book Purchasing: What Are We Buying and Is It Getting Used?
This poster describes a project we undertook to review how our purchasing patterns have changed since we set up licenses with e-book vendors through GOBI four years ago. While we knew which liaisons were initially most interested in purchasing e-books, after setting up the licenses we had not gathered any follow up data about what selection decisions liaisons were making. We wanted to see what data we could compile on this, and we were particularly interested in identifying subject areas in which a real mix of e-books and print were being purchased which we could examine to compare print circulation and e-book usage of purchased titles. The objective of the poster is to show what data we were able to gather, what aspects of this study proved more challenging than initially expected, and how we're hoping to use our findings to shape internal conversations about e-book purchasing.

Speakers
avatar for Amelia Brunskill

Amelia Brunskill

Coordinator of Collections & Scholarly Resources, DePaul University
Amelia Brunskill is the Coordinator of Collections & Scholarly Resources at DePaul University. She was previously DePaul's Electronic Resources Librarian and prior to that she was the Liaison Librarian for the Sciences at Dickinson College, in Carlisle, PA. She received her MSIS from... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Linked Data and SHARE
ARL's SHARE project (http://www.share-research.org) "is building a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle." Working with SHARE, the Center for Open Science (COS) has harvested and organized a wealth of metadata from various institutional repositories and other sources such as open data repositories. While COS has already provided a search function, there remains a need for other mechanisms to discover, search and visualize content within SHARE. With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University, Portico and IEEE have developed RMap (http://rmap-project.info/rmap/), which features a method for building and displaying linked data information graphs.

Using the RMap protocol for aggregations known as DiSCO, which is based on the OAI-ORE protocol, and a set of REST APIs, the RMap team has worked with COS to develop a data model for SHARE and harmonize the SHARE metadata into a set of linked data information graphs. These linked data graphs represent a useful resource and lens for making new connections between content within the SHARE network, identifying gaps in SHARE metadata and visualizing the SHARE network as a linked data framework. The COS has expressed an interest for additional work with RMap and SHARE.

The RMap team has also generated linked data information graphs from all of the journal content from IEEE and additional content from ACM, NCBI and Portico, all of which was used to infer connections within the SHARE network.

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean, Johns Hopkins University


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Metrics, Meaning, and Context: Librarian Roles in Reporting Faculty Impact and Author Profile Curation
Citation analysis can be used as a tool to report activity and impact for departmental annual reports, faculty promotion and tenure dossiers, campus-wide visibility initiatives, and beyond. At a STEM focused doctoral granting institution, librarians analyze citation metrics annually, gathering h-index numbers, citation numbers at varying intervals, and highest cited papers for each individual. Comparing three available citation tools, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar, librarians noticed many inconsistencies and variations. I plan to walk participants through this analysis process, highlight efficiencies, and point out problem areas.

Newer tools such as ResearchGate, Kudos, and Altmetrics are bringing more to the conversation about truly measuring impact, in addition to tools like SciVal, Pure, and Converis. There is a common problem of maintenance of effort and author identification. ORCiD has made great strides in many author identification areas, but there is more to be done to engage the faculty to populate their individual profiles.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Clemons

Jessica Clemons

Interim Director of College Libraries, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Nothing Changes if Nothing Changes: Three User-Centered Collection Development Practices at Carleton University Library
From 2014-2016, Carleton University Library has been super-adding to the traditional ways it practices collection development. In addition to the subject liaison firm order selection model, the past two years the Library has added three successful new user-centred ways to acquire material for the Library. In the Collections department, we ended the approval plan and instead used its selection framework to create a DDA plan. In the Reserves department, we started a textbook purchasing program. And in the Interlibrary Loans department, we instituted print purchase on demand procedures.

We propose a triptych with three easy-to-read sections, dedicated to each of the preceding three initiatives. Each section will provide a concise but substantial overview of the initiative; set-up challenges and parameters of operation; data visualization of circulation statistics compared to the industry average; strengths and weaknesses; and key takeaways.

This poster may be of interest to librarians who would like to consider adopting one or more of these user-centred collection development initiatives, and to vendors who might like to hear about why user- centred models resonate well in the current academic climate of accountability and good financial stewardship.

Speakers
avatar for David Sharp

David Sharp

Head, Acquisitions, Carleton University Library


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

One Size Does Not Fit All: Tuning the Discovery Service to Meet Stakeholder Needs
More often than not, a one-sized single solution does not fit. When implementing a discovery service, each institution has its own requirements and different types of users have different needs. In this session, the two universities will examine different configuration and customization options that are available to libraries when implementing a discovery service. Join Esther Onega, University of Virginia and Kristi Lobrano, Franklin University to discuss what libraries can do independently, and where vendor support comes in. Topics include branding, profile options, catalog and IR loading, linking, and website integration.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Frierson

Eric Frierson

Senior Director of Field Engineering, North America, EBSCO
Hey! I'm the team lead for library services engineering and integration for EBSCO. This means I can answer any question you might have about integrating EDS or the EDS API into your library and campus. I'm also a developer, building applications that use our API in outside-of-the-box... Read More →
avatar for Kristi Lobrano

Kristi Lobrano

Systems Librarian, Franklin University
avatar for Esther Onega

Esther Onega

Director, Collections Delivery and Access, University of Virgina
Esther Onega has been a librarian in various capacities at the University of Virginia since 1997, starting as the Distance Education Librarian. In 2007 she became the Google Book Project Manager, then Head of the Brown Science & Engineering Library, and now she is the Director of... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Open and Collaborative: Building the Big Ten Academic Alliance Geoportal Abstract
Ten member institutions of the Big Ten Academic Alliance, formerly the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) worked together to create the Big Ten Academic Alliance Geoportal, a discovery interface to facilitate access, and to connect scholars to geospatial data resources. Ten of the member institutions are participating in the project, including the University of Illinois at Urbana­-Champaign, Indiana University, the University of Iowa, the University of Maryland, the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota, Pennsylvania State University, Purdue University, and the University of Wisconsin-­Madison. The institutions worked together to identify openly available data sets to make searchable in the interface. The project then organized the collaborative creation and aggregation of discovery-focused metadata describing geospatial data resources and made those resources discoverable via an open source portal built in Geoblacklight. The collectively supported project provides the staffing and technical infrastructure to host and develop the services. The poster will show the organization of this collaborative project and the established processes for collaborative geospatial metadata creation and portal development. It will also outline upcoming work for the project, including interface assessment and plans to include licensed data in the discovery interface.

Speakers
avatar for Mara Blake

Mara Blake

Spatial and Numeric Data Librarian, University of Michigan
As a spatial and numeric data library, I work on building our library collections of geospatial data and providing better discoverability and access to the collection. I also work with researchers using numeric, qualitative, and geospatial data technologies in their research and... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Ordering E-Books from a Print Book Vendor
The University of Southern Mississippi recently began ordering e-books through their primary book vendor, Midwest Library Service. This is a new service offered by Midwest beginning in 2016. The University of Southern Mississippi had previously ordered e-books with another book vendor, but within the last two years had switched to ordering directly with the e-book vendors - Ebook Library and Ebrary. Jennifer Culley, Collection Management and Acquisitions Librarian at The University of Southern Mississippi, will discuss the process for adding this new service, issues along the way, any possible benefits or costs, and also discuss changes to work flows for the Acquisitions department. Cindy Human, Regional Manager with Midwest Library Service, will explain the software changes and steps taken to make this new service work for The University of Southern Mississippi. This presentation will describe the collaborative process between The University of Southern Mississippi Libraries and Midwest Library Service in setting up the new e-book service and will be informative for the audience who may be considering adding a similar feature with their book vendors, or give participants who want to discuss their issues or experiences a forum to do so.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Culley

Jennifer Culley

Collection Management and Acquisitions Librarian, The University of Southern Mississippi
CH

Cindy Human

Regional Sales Manager, Midwest Library Service


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Passing the Baton: Data-Driven Succession Planning and the New Liaison Role
Learn how to embark on or re-engage with academic department support in meaningful, data-driven ways by pulling from the practices developed at a large public university in the process of re-envisioning its own liaison program. Drawing from recent field scholarship, existing liaison activity rubrics, and the experiences of early career professionals in Business and the Social Sciences, participants will take home tested tips on how to successfully transition liaison duties in an effective, comprehensive manner.

This poster presentation will address: seamless succession planning, vendor relations, collection maintenance and management, cultivating faculty relationships, and programming magnetic outreach in and outside of your library.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Ahnberg

Katherine Ahnberg

Academic Services Librarian, University of South Florida
NW

Nora Wood

Business Librarian, University of South Florida Libraries



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Rolling with a Direction in Mind: Implementing a DRM-free DDA Program and Understanding User Behavior
Demand-driven acquisitions has been part of the University of Washington's ebook purchasing strategy since 2011, via local and consortial DDA programs with EBL. While this aligns with the University Libraries' commitment to user-driven collection development, it has not advanced its more recently affirmed strategy of increasing the amount of DRM-free content provided to patrons. A DDA program begun with JSTOR in May, 2015, unites these two strategies and also aligns with the University Libraries' desire to support university presses and other not-for-profit scholarly publishing.

Information on the University of Washington's implementation experience will be shared, including budgeting, duplication control, and assessment, along with comparative usage data with other local ebook collections.

The University of Washington experience will be put into a broader context by JSTOR, especially as it relates to acquisition methods, discovery, and usage. There will be a detailed overview of post-purchase usage across libraries for DRM-free ebooks acquired via JSTOR's DDA model and those purchased as individual titles from YBP or direct from JSTOR. This will be compared to the usage seen from the University of Washington.

Understanding how users are finding and using DRM-free ebooks is also important to libraries wanting to promote this type of DRM-free content. JSTOR will provide an overview of how ebooks are first being discovered before chapters are used on the JSTOR p[latform from various sources such as Google, indexed discovery services, JSTOR, and library websites. The University of Washington experience will be analyzed to illustrate these findings.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Di Biase

Linda Di Biase

Ebook and Collaborative Collections Strategy Librarian, University of Washington Libraries
Linda Di Biase's 30 years of collection development experience at the University of Washington Libraries has encompassed everything from information resources selection to budget allocation and consortial collection strategies. She has overseen the development of a robust academic... Read More →
JL

John Lenahan

AVP Outreach and Participation Services, JSTOR


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Self-Directed Training Programs: What Have We Gotten Ourselves Into!
In response to an Old Dominion University Library Administration initiative, the Acquisitions & Preservation Services and Reference Departments participated in a self-directed training pilot project over a six month period from October 2015 through March 2016. Administrators looked to the departments to inform them of the viability of implementing such a program system-wide and to develop a blueprint for other units in the library to follow in case of implementation.

Department members were charged with completing two programs per month in any of eighteen subject areas. In addition, participants were asked to keep a log of programs attended, to write a synopsis of those programs, and to explain how the sessions impacted their work performance. Webinars, formal training modules, in-library programs, on-campus training sessions - about any delivery format and forum were acceptable options.

Visuals will provide an overview of the initiative, charts of training sessions attended, and challenges faced by participants. Perhaps, most importantly, takeaways and recommendations will be represented including insights into whether self-directed training is a feasible option for meeting individual and library training needs. An example of an effective and efficient self-directed training model will be featured.

Speakers
avatar for Rob Tench

Rob Tench

Acquisitions & Resources Fulfillment Librarian, Old Dominion University
Rob has been at ODU since 2007.



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

University Press DDA and EBA Acquisition Pilots at UIUC
The University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign has been exploring options to obtain the best academic content from University Presses in the format and on the platform users find fits their needs. The Library works with a number of vendors to cover the purchase of new academic content from these publishers. Funding comes from a central pool for new titles as well as the bibliographers' subject allocations. Users had not been happy with platforms with DRM that limit easy use or with the sheer number of ebook interfaces. The poster covers new initiatives designed to enhance access to ebooks while not replacing the print access many faculty still want. Metrics from two large DDA/EBA pilots completed in FY2016 that allowed for online access to new and archival ebook content will be presented. The implementation of the programs as well as patterns of use will provided. An analysis of user preferences collected from surveys is also included as well as a review ebook purchasing models at UIUC. The poster will cover next steps to enhance access to academic ebooks. Participants will hear learn about new evidence based potential for university press ebook acquisitions and what worked well or did not with the programs. Questions are most welcome during the session.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Baker

Stephanie Baker

Library Information Systems Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
avatar for Thomas H. Teper

Thomas H. Teper

Associate Dean for Collections and Technical Services, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Lynn Wiley

Lynn Wiley

Head of Acquisitions, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Will Weed DDA for Money: DDA Collection Management Decisions in an Economic Crisis
2015 was not just a tough year for the mining sector in Canada. The drastic drop in the value of the Canadian dollar resulted in a fiscal crisis that left Western University Libraries with an unprecedented and unpredictable 25 percent decrease in purchasing power. With a large, successful DDA program to maintain, Western was faced with an economic crisis of their own.

The likelihood of a continued weak Canadian dollar relative to the US dollar led Western to determine that rolling with the fiscal times would be the only option. As a cornerstone of their acquisition strategy, the DDA would have to be revamped to ensure minimal impact on both stakeholders and the collection while working within the current fiscal realities.

This joint session shares the Western experience in working with ProQuest to develop a collection management plan that would transform a challenge into an opportunity by using a budget crisis to spur the creation of a replicable and repeatable DDA collection clean-up process. We will share the step-by-step project timeline, describe problems and outline how we worked together to develop solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Cassady

Samuel Cassady

Head, Collections and Content Strategies, Western University
CH

Cara Huwieler

Collections Consultant, ProQuest


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Friday, November 4
 

6:00pm

An Arsenal of Library Resources: Demonstrating the Value of the Collection
How does your library demonstrate the value of its collection to university or hospital administrators? It takes more than just usage stats. Show your administrators how your collection supports the institutional mission, faculty research, student learning, patients and family, the local community, and even increase profitability. Join this presentation to listen to, and share ideas on, how institutional and library administrators can identify shared goals that are supported by, and show the value of, your library collection.

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Romano

Joanne Romano

Head of Resource Mgmt., Texas Medical Center Library
I enjoy networking with other resource managers, and learning about the similar challenges and solutions to be discovered in managing the collection. If is also interesting to hear what communication channels various managers use to demonstrate to administrators, how the library's... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

An Infographic is Worth a Thousand Words: Using Data Visualization to Engage Faculty in Collection Strategies
Are you more likely to read a table of data, or engage with a pictorial representation of the same information? Using words and visuals together has been proven to increase understanding and interest. This presentation will describe our recent undertaking to engage our stakeholders, especially faculty, in the assessment, analysis, and development of our library collections. Using graphs and other visual representations, we are effectively presenting our current state, trends, and user behavior. These ongoing conversations are engaging faculty and leading to a deeper understanding of our collections and how they support the curriculum at our institution. 

Speakers
avatar for Beth Bohstedt

Beth Bohstedt

Director, Access Services & Collections Strategies, Hamilton College



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Article Lending's Impact on Institutional Usage
In this poster session we will investigate the relationship between Rapid ILL lending counts and Columbia University's subscribed journal usage. Using a test case, we will examine individually subscribed journals from one publisher and cross reference those journals with their COUNTER JR1 usage and ILL lending usage over three years (2013-2015). For these journal titles, we will investigate what percentage of use is coming from our lending requests and if this relationship changes how we should view our journal cost per use. In so doing, we will determine the impact, if any, lending counts have on our cost per use metric.

The goals of this project will be to provide a workflow and advice for how to incorporate ILL usage into collection assessment and development. We hope that the outcomes from this project will benefit librarians in making informed decisions with regards to retention of their individually subscribed journal collections.

Speakers
avatar for Colleen Major

Colleen Major

Head, E-Resources Management, Columbia University
Colleen Major is Head of Electronic Resources Management: Operations & Analysis for Columbia University Libraries, where her work focuses on the electronic resource life cycle.
avatar for Krystie Wilfong

Krystie Wilfong

Collection Assessment and Analysis Librarian, Columbia University
Krystie is the Collection Assessment & Analysis Librarian for the Science and Engineering division of Columbia University Libraries. She received her B.A. from Gettysburg College in 2008 and her M.L.I.S. from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science in 2013. Previously... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Drawing Comparisons: Analyzing Art & Architecture Print and E-book Usage
Recent studies have shown that despite possible preconceptions, e-books in art and architecture subject areas are actually quite well used. By collaborating across four SCELC-affiliated Southern California institutions (Claremont Colleges Library, Loyola Marymount University, Pepperdine University, and the University of Southern California), we engaged in extensive usage analyses to understand more about what might motivate art and architecture researchers to seek out e-books, and compare that usage to print books.

Our study addressed the following questions:
1. Does usage reveal a user preference between electronic and print format for art & architecture?
2. Is usage by publisher consistent across print and electronic formats?
3. Do art & architecture e-book usage patterns at our individual institutions align with Michael Levine-Clark's broad findings on usage in his 2014 study?
4. Is it possible to generalize trends in e-book usage in art & architecture?

Our poster will cover: methods for collaborating on data collection and analysis; challenges in identifying and working with consistent usage data; findings on print and electronic book usage in art & architecture subjects to support potential directions in collection development.

Speakers
MD

Madelynn Dickerson

Information Resources Coordinator, Claremont Colleges Library
avatar for Jamie Hazlitt

Jamie Hazlitt

Librarian for Collection Development & Evaluation, Loyola Marymount University
avatar for Caroline Muglia

Caroline Muglia

Co-Associate Dean for Collections, University of Southern California
Caroline Muglia is the Co-Associate Dean for Collections at University of Southern California (USC). In this capacity, she also manages collection assessment and resource sharing initiatives at the Libraries.


Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Efficient Deselection and Other Stories: A Fellowship at UNC Charlotte
In the summer of 2016, the J. Murrey Atkins Library at UNC Charlotte had a graduate fellow conduct an assessment of the health sciences resources. It was a pilot project with the secondary goal of establishing a procedure for subject assessment that could later be applied to other areas of the collection. There ended up being several elements to the project. The first involved choosing physical titles for deselection, as the collection had not previously been extensively weeded and health sciences materials become outdated quickly. Another task was the recommendation of new items. This emphasized electronic resources for a number of reasons (they are popular in the health sciences, and the school has an increasing number of long-distance students). An informal survey was created and sent to health sciences librarians at peer institutions to see what databases and other electronic tools their users preferred. Throughout the eleven-week project, the fellow conducted a literature analysis of materials relating to general collection development as well as the health sciences in particular. The most relevant resources were compiled into an annotated bibliography for future participants in similar projects. This was organized into specific subject areas (Nursing Resources, Ebook Deselection, Open Access, etc.) for easy reference. The poster will present the audience with collection assessment methods for a large academic library; these can then be adapted to other subjects and institutions. The emphasis on electronic resources makes it particularly relevant to current issues in collection development.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Krueger

Stephen Krueger

Student/ILL Assistant, University of North Carolina
Stephen is a second-year LIS student at UNC Chapel Hill. He aspires to academic librarianship of some sort; interlibrary loan is his true love, but a delightful summer fellowship with UNC Charlotte's Collection Development department left his loyalties divided. Prior to library school... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Firm-Ordered vs. DDA ebooks: What Are the Differences?
While many academic libraries with Demand-Driven Acquisitions (DDA) programs acquire ebooks based on actual patron usage, ebooks are also simultaneously acquired via firm orders. Ebook firm orders, primarily requested by subject experts or faculty library users, are largely processed manually, taking staff time and effort while also requiring separate processes for approval, processing, and tracking.

In this session, ebooks acquired by the Kent State University Libraries over a four-year period, using both approaches, are compared to see whether there are any differences between the two sets in terms of subject matter, publisher, publishing year, price, and post-purchase usage. Such analysis helps address some key questions about firm orders:
(1) How can the two ebook acquisition approaches be compared and evaluated?
(2) How does firm order ebook acquisitions translate into actual usage? Do firm orders receive the same level of usage compared to their DDA counterparts?
(3) Does the firm order method meet a unique need of library users that a DDA ebook program does not?
(4) What actions to take post-evaluation?

This session contributes to evidence-based ebook acquisition assessments and suggests possible ways how the two ebook acquisition approaches may be adjusted to better meet user needs.

This poster is co-authored by Kay Downey, Collection Management Librarian, University Libraries, Kent State University, who was unable to attend the conference. 

Speakers
avatar for Yin Zhang

Yin Zhang

Professor, School of Information, Kent State University
Dr. Yin Zhang is a professor at the School of Information (iSchool) at Kent State University (KSU). She received her Ph.D. in Library and Information Science from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and her B.S. and M.S. in Information Science from Wuhan University, China... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

From Data to Outreach and Back Again: How Library Instruction Can Boost Usage/Statistics
Library instruction sessions may not traditionally be thought of as outreach for specific library resources but in fact they can play a significant role in increasing usage statistics.  Usage statistics, although somewhat flawed, can be a good jumping off point to determine what resources to review and discuss with university faculty.  Qualitative methods can also be used to determine faculty priorities for e-resources.  Learn how instructional librarians can work together with electronic resource librarians to evaluate subject-specific electronic resources in order to both promote resources and determine future directions for collection development.  Attendees will learn how the promotion of underutilized resources through library instruction and other efforts can help to either increase their use or demonstrate that they are no longer needed. 

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Binder

Amanda Binder

Social Sciences and History Librarian, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Elizabeth Siler

Elizabeth Siler

Collection Development Librarian, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Collection Development Librarian at UNC Charlotte. I manage the acquisition and decision making process for both our print and electronic materials as well as managing the budget. I am especially interested in textbook affordability and open access publishing as... Read More →
KY

Karna Younger

Faculty Engagement Librarian, University of Kansas


Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Harnessing EZproxy Data for Evidence-Based Decision Making
Building on a successful pilot study, this poster illustrates improved methodology and results from an EZProxy data project at Ryerson University. The purpose of our project is to fill a gap left by vendor usage reports, where some of the key questions remain unanswered: What resources are used? How often? And by who? The lack of reliable COUNTER data across all products and the absence of demographic information made it difficult to paint a complete picture of electronic resources usage across the institution. In order to fill this gap, the presenters collaborated with a computer science professor at Ryerson University on this project. In the pilot phase, we established relationships with campus partners including the Registrar’s Office and Campus Computing Services, and established a process to match IDs in the logs with demographic details about the user, while anonymizing the data to protect user privacy. Subsequent work has focused on the development of an in-house tool for analysis and data visualization.

This poster will describe our in-house development and outline some existing open source equivalents. Attendees will gain insights into the structure of the EZProxy data, how it can be used for evidence-based decision making. For institutions interested in embarking a similar project, they would benefit from our experience, both pros and cons. Vendors can deepen their understanding of the needs of academic library customers.

Speakers
LJ

Lei Jin

Electronic Resources Librarian, Ryerson University


Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Keeping Up Accessibility Practices and How It Relates to Purchasing and Collection Development in Academic Libraries, a Case Study at the College of Staten Island
At the College of Staten Island library, the library subscribes to over one hundred and sixty different electronic resources the library subscribes to. A concerted effort started in 2016 to start collecting relevant VPAT statements from current and/ or new vendors, and to integrate these new steps into the current workflow. A VPAT repository was created through CORAL, an open-source ERM. Next, the process of evaluating these VPAT and making decisions based on user feedback will be discussed. The poster will discuss the responsibilities of purchasing agents in libraries (acquisition or electronic resource librarians) in regards to first understanding disability laws and how these mandates apply when investigating, evaluating, acquiring, and maintaining electronic resources. Relevant tools will have been discussed, in particular, the use of VPAT or Voluntary Product Accessibility Templates and even WCAG 2.0 guidelines that are used when evaluating digital resources for Section 508 compliance. The benefits and downfalls of these evaluation tools would have been discussed as well as the sharing of current processes used at different libraries in determining the accessibility of e-resources. The concept of universal design (UD) will be discussed, which is beneficial to all patrons, and how to incorporate UD into better purchasing decisions for digital products in acquisitions.

Speakers
avatar for Prof Kerry Falloon

Prof Kerry Falloon

Acquisitions Librarian, CUNY- College of Staten Island
With over a decade of experience in academic libraries, my prior positions included Acquisitions & Collection Development librarian at Saint Peter's University, Administrator of Technical Services at Ocean County Community College and currently, Assistant Professor & Acquisitions... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Measuring the Impact of Spanish-Language Resource Sharing: A Comparative Analysis of Interlibrary Loan Lending, 2011-2015
In this study, authors from two universities in The Big Ten Academic Alliance (BTAA), formerly the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), examine and compare five years of interlibrary loan transactions at their respective institutions. The authors attempt to evaluate the use of Spanish-language materials beyond their home campuses and aim to demonstrate the potential impact of Spanish-language collections in an environment of distributed collections and institutional collaborations. The data is analyzed within defined Library of Congress Classification ranges, by language, and Carnegie Classification and geographical locations of the borrowing institution. The authors examine ILL borrowing within the BTAA and beyond their home states, investigating service to the broader constituent populations and the role of public research universities. While both institutional libraries' Spanish-language collections are strong, neither library has historically been a major collection on a national scale. This study aims to demonstrate that these collections still contribute unique and valuable materials beyond their home campuses. Additionally, it attempts to the exhibit the value of Spanish-language materials and may help subject libraries and liaison librarians in collection development decisions.

Speakers
LG

Lisa Gardinier

Latin American & Iberian Studies Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries
MO

Manuel Ostos

Librarian for Romance Languages and Literatures, Penn State University Libraries


Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Preserve Local and Institution-Specific Data during Migration to a Network Cataloging Environment
Augusta University Libraries are in the process of migrating from Ex Libris' Voyager traditional integrated library system (ILS) into Ex Libris' next-generation library management solution Alma. As part of the migration process, our cataloging records, currently created and maintained by our libraries, will be migrated into a collaborative network zone that comprises 29 institutions in the University System of Georgia consortium, to allow for collaborative cataloging among multiple libraries. While most of the data can be transferred by setting up proper mapping, migration of local field information poses a challenge. As an institution comprised of a health sciences library and an academic library, we face a unique challenge in preserving our medical subject headings (MeSH). Based on the migration schedule, some of our bibliographic records with MeSH headings could be replaced by bibliographic records without MeSH headings unless we identify and migrate those records into our institutional zone which will be managed by our libraries. In addition, bibliographic records with local fields such as MARC fields 59X, 69X, and 9XX need to be moved into our institutional zone as well. The authors discuss strategies and tips to prevent data loss during the migration. Beyond this migration, it becomes equally important to think carefully about how to best organize those local fields in a future-proof way in the context of RDA, BIBFRAME and linked-data environment. The authors explore how Alma can help organize local information in bibliographic, holding, and item level records and how local information can be discovered.

Poster co-authors: Sandra Bandy, Chair, Content Management, Augusta University; Rod Bustos,  Assistant Director for Library Systems, Augusta University; Melissa Johnson, Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian at  Augusta University.

Speakers
LM

Li Ma

Cataloging & Metadata Librarian, Augusta University


Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Restructuring a Popular Magazine Collection: Using Microassessment Strategies to Keep Rolling with the Times
As with many undergraduate libraries at large academic research institutions, the collections of the Shapiro Undergraduate Library (UGL) at the University of Michigan support the curricular, leisure, and lifelong learning interests of first and second year undergraduate students. It is not an archival collection; it can "roll with the times!" During the 2013-2014 academic year, the UGL restructured its periodical collection. Subscriptions to academic and scholarly journals were cancelled, but students still have access to those journals through the research collections of the university library. Simultaneously the UGL's periodical collection refocused its scope to an emphasis on current and popular magazines.

To determine the efficacy of this change, we posed the following questions: How has this collection been used in the last two years since this change? Are undergraduate students aware of the magazine collection? Who uses this collection? For what purpose? With these questions in mind, we conducted a series of microassessments using surveys and mobile polls, as well as circulation data. This was done in collaboration between the library's collection analyst, the UGL's collection coordinator, and a library science graduate student as part of her collection development-focused internship.

The poster will include our methodology, particularly the microassessment tools we used, the results of our assessments, and how we used them to inform changes to the collection.

Speakers
avatar for Helen Look

Helen Look

Collection Analyst, University of Michigan
Helen Look is the Collection Analyst for the University of Michigan Library. Reporting to the Associate University Librarian for Collections, Helen provides support for the generation and analysis of data for the assessment of the library’s collection development programs and the... Read More →
avatar for Pam MacKintosh

Pam MacKintosh

Collection Coordinator, Shapiro Undergraduate Library and Coordinator of Shapiro Library Reference Services, University of Michigan
Pam MacKintosh is Coordinator, Shapiro Library Reference Services at the University of Michigan and serves as the collection coordinator for undergraduate collections.  
avatar for Faith Weis

Faith Weis

Shapiro Collections Intern, and Master of Science in Information Candidate \'17, University of Michigan
I am a graduate student at the University of Michigan's School of Information, graduating April 2017. I am also currently a Collections Intern and a User and Information Services Assistant at the University of Michigan Libraries. My interests range from collection development to reference... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Rolling out a Database Review: Initiating a Comprehensive Database Review at the University of Maryland Libraries
The University of Maryland Libraries (UMD), has experienced a static collection budget for over 14 years. Despite the best efforts of the Collection Development and Acquisitions units to mitigate the continuing effect of serials inflation, it became evident in summer 2015 that budgetary expenses would have to be curtailed in order to meet increasing serials costs. In the fall of 2015, the Libraries initiated the first-ever comprehensive database review across all subject areas. The review involved subject specialists as well as Acquisitions and Collection Development personnel. Poster session attendees will learn how the review process was developed, who was involved, what information was provided, how cancellation decisions were made and communicated, and the steps taken to publicize those resources selected for cancellation.

Speakers
avatar for Leigh Ann DePope

Leigh Ann DePope

Head of Acquisitions and Data Services, University of Maryland College Park
avatar for Maggie Saponaro

Maggie Saponaro

Head of Collection Development, University of Maryland, College Park
Directs the collection development work of the University of Maryland Libraries’ subject specialist liaison librarians, with primary responsibility for content and budgeting of the UMD Libraries' general collections. Serves on the Collection Strategies and Services (CSS) administrative... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Scoping Your eJournal List: Creating a Tailored List of Biomedical Journals in a Large University Setting
With the large amount of electronic resources available to libraries and their users today, libraries must find ways to present that information to users in manageable ways. Academic medical libraries have the additional challenge of presenting properly scoped biomedical resources to clinicians, medical students, graduate students, and faculty from both local resources and those available through the parent academic institution and library. Come learn how the Penn State University College of Medicine Harrell Health Sciences Library embarked on a project to create a scoped eJournal list to provide clean access to biomedical resources for library users. We will discuss how we formed an authoritative list of journals, the process used to create the scoped list, and lessons learned along the way.

This poster is co-authored by Marie Cirelli, Collection Access and Support Services Librarian, Penn State College of Medicine Harrell Health Sciences Library, who was unable to attend the conference. 

Speakers
avatar for Lori Snyder

Lori Snyder

Collection Development and Digital Resource Management Librarian, Penn State University College of Medicine Harrell Health Sciences Library



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Validating a Myth? Do Books that Don't Circulate Early Ever Do?
It's a common trope in academic libraries that if a print book doesn't circulate in its first 5-10 years, it probably never will. I conducted a research study of about 15,000 books published and acquired from 1991-1996 to test this idea. Results are presented.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Belvadi

Melissa Belvadi

User Experience & Collections Librarian, University of Prince Edward Island
Academic collections management and analysis, particularly electronic books and serials. How to squeeze every last penny of value from our depressingly small budget. User experience in electronic products and optimizing discoverability experience. Data visualization. Google Sheets... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

When the Newcomer Breaks the Mold: Meeting the Resource Needs of an Evolving Campus
In 2003, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) established its newest campus, Mission Bay. This campus focused primarily on biomedical research until 2015 when the Mission Bay Medical Center was opened. The UCSF Library has had a small, specialized collection at Mission Bay since its creation; however, this dramatic change and expansion of the Mission Bay landscape caused the Library to recognize that the collection needed an extensive update in order to continue to fulfill the needs of this evolving campus.

The objective of this poster presentation is to demonstrate what steps the UCSF Library took to improve its collection and presence on the Mission Bay campus in 2015 and 2016. Using a small budget and limited space, relevant clinical resources were added to the collection and a systematic updating of the existing biomedical materials took place. At the same time, targeted marketing of the Library's spaces and services to the Mission Bay community was developed and executed. The different types of data collected, the actions taken by the UCSF Library, and what we learned about our users' changing behaviors and perceptions will be visualized. The Library's next steps will also be explored.

Attendees can expect to learn about the assessment and decision-making processes that the UCSF Library used to improve, promote, and better understand the Mission Bay collection and its users. The presenter looks forward to learning from the audience about how they have handled similar situations at their institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah McClung

Sarah McClung

Head of Collection Development, University of California, San Francisco



Friday November 4, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401