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Thursday, November 3
 

11:35am EDT

A New Open Source LSP? Oh My!
Recently, libraries learned of FOLIO - a new community collaboration to develop an open source library services platform (LSP). The collaboration of vendors and libraries is working to bring an LSP to market that includes traditional ILS functionality but also promises to innovate in dramatically new ways. The community - comprised of librarians and technologists, designers, service providers and vendors - has the potential to reshape the library technology space in ways we haven't seen before.

There's enormous possibility in this initiative, and as libraries it behooves us to explore further. What are our needs and wants when it comes to an open source LSP? How and when does open source become an option that allows for mass adoption? How should we as libraries innovate and how can we help shape the direction of the systems we rely on? And how, as a discipline, do we embrace change as we look towards the future of our technology space?

This panel will explore the new LSP initiative. We will look at our resource management needs, our need to align more closely with the broader academic institution, and the need for real innovation in library technology.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Information Systems Librarian, Millersville University
avatar for Neil Block

Neil Block

Vice President, Global Open Source Innovation, EBSCO
TF

Tania Fersenheim

Content & Applications Manager, Fenway Libraries Online
avatar for Michael Winkler

Michael Winkler

Managing Director OLE (Open Library Environment), OLE



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Author Identifiers in the Research Life-Cycle
This session will provide an overview of the role of author identifiers in scholarly communication, with a particular focus on ORCID and ResearcherID. Author identifiers help  solve the name disambiguation problem by providing researchers with a unique identifier that they can connect with their scholarly output, and use when submitting or creating future scholarly work. As an open identifier, ORCID is now embedded in hundreds of systems across all researcher workflows - funding, publishing, research institutions, scholarly associations, and more. ResearcherID, developed by Thomson Reuters (now Clarivate Analytics), is a proprietary author identifier that enables researchers to manage their publication lists, track their times cited counts and h-index, identify potential collaborators and avoid author misidentification; it’s also integrated with Web of Science and is ORCID compliant. After a brief overview of identifiers in the research infrastructure, there will be a short introduction to ORCID and ResearcherID, followed by strategies for librarians at colleges and research universities to encourage the use of author identifiers including ORCID and ResearcherID. The presentations will be followed by a panel discussion of key opportunities and challenges, learning points and successes, including a mix of pre-prepared and audience questions.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Chief Strategist for Research Collaboration, Libraries, North Carolina State University
avatar for Joelle Masciulli

Joelle Masciulli

Head of Research Discovery, Thomson Reuters
Joelle has been with Thomson Reuters for over 15 years. She has held a variety of leadership positions in the organization with the IP&Science business and has very recently taken the position of Head of Content Strategy. In this role Joelle is responsible for developing and executing... Read More →
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Communications, ORCID
 
avatar for Mary Ellen  Sloane

Mary Ellen Sloane

Science Librarian, Middle Tennessee State University
Mary Ellen Sloane is the Science Librarian and an Associate Professor at Middle Tennessee State University. Her research interests include scholarly communication, information literacy, library technology, and user experience.


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

COUNTER Release 5: Consistency, Clarity, Simplification and Continuous Maintainence
COUNTER published its first Code of Practice in 2003 and has since been improving this international standard to meet the evolving needs of its library, publisher and vendor membership. Work is now underway on Release 5 of the COUNTER Code of Practice with a promise that it will provide improved reporting on usage of scholarly information in an ever-changing discovery and access environment.  The themes of Release 5 are consistency, clarity, simplification, flexibility and continuous maintenance. This presentation addresses how Release 5 aims to address current challenges to ensure that all publishers and content providers are able to achieve compliance.

Speakers
avatar for Lorraine Estelle

Lorraine Estelle

Project Director, COUNTER
Lorraine Estelle is the COUNTER Project Director. Launched in March 2002, COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources) is an international initiative serving librarians, publishers and intermediaries by setting standards that facilitate the recording and reporting... Read More →
avatar for Anne Osterman

Anne Osterman

VIVA Director, George Mason University/VIVA
Anne Osterman is a librarian with over ten years of experience in academic libraries. She has worked in a variety of roles, including research data services, reference and instruction, acquisitions, and the licensing of electronic resources. She is currently Director of the Virtual... Read More →
avatar for Oliver Pesch

Oliver Pesch

Chief Strategist, EBSCO
Oliver Pesch works as chief product strategist for EBSCO Information Services where he helps set direction for EBSCO's e-resource services and products, including EBSCO Usage Consolidation and EBSCONET Analytics. Oliver is a strong supporter of standards and is very involved in the... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Cutting the Cord: Learning to Live Without Comprehensive Journal Packages
Academic libraries have become increasingly dependent on large journal packages. Initially these “big deals” were a boon for libraries who needed to provide more online access to journal articles, but found it difficult to manage, much less pay, for these serials. Journal packages represented both convenient aggregated access and to some degree savings, but over time librarians started to question whether the “big deal” was really worth it. Article usage statistics were good overall, but were all of the titles being used enough to justify paying for them as part of a large online collection? Rising costs and lack of control over the exact content paid for are making some libraries question the real value of journal packages.

Using a case study with an anonymous publisher, this presentation will provide a review of the decision making process that ultimately led to the cancellation of an entire large journal package (over 1400 titles) at San Francisco State University’s J. Paul Leonard Library. The rationale behind this decision was based on a detailed cost/use analysis of the package. Another factor in the decision was the challenge of maintaining other resource commitments in an environment with a stagnant collections budget. Because of this the Library had to prioritize resources including journal packages. The presentation will include a summary of the data analysis involved. It will also provide a discussion of the impact the decision has had on the Library and the University as a whole. That impact included a need to communicate with stakeholders (and their reactions) as well as the desire to provide continued access to valued resources through other means, such as interlibrary services and “demand driven” models.

The “big deal” journal packages have become an important part of academic library collections in recent years, to the extent that they are often seen as indispensable, but the experience of J. Paul Leonard Library has shown that you can cut the cord and still survive.

Speakers
avatar for David Hellman

David Hellman

Collection Development Coordinator, San Francisco State University
David Hellman is the Collection Development Coordinator and an Associate Librarian at San Francisco State University. He has held previous positions at Santa Clara University, New York University and the Brooklyn Public Library. David has presented at several conferences including... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Do We Approve? New Models for Assessing Approval Plans
Approval plans are an established method of acquiring library materials whereby a vendor selects material for a library based on profiles established by the Library. At Yale University, we allocate a significant percentage of our collections budget to monograph approval plans. While some academic libraries have reduced or eliminated book approval plans in favor of new acquisition models, like demand driven or evidence-based acquisitions, others, including Yale, continue to rely heavily on traditional approval plans for collection development.

Using fifteen years of Yale Library acquisitions and circulation data, we have developed models that allow for approval plan assessment by various facets, such as language, publication year, publisher, and approval vendor. We compare use of approval plan books, patron-requested purchases, and titles individually selected by librarians. We examine approval plan monographs in the context of resource sharing networks. We also examine approval plan acquisitions in the context of our growing collection of e-books, including licensed subscription models (Ebrary, Overdrive) and perpetual access e-book packages (e.g. Springer, Project Muse/UPCC). The goal is to create a viable model for ongoing assessment of our approval programs in the context of our overall collection development strategy.

Our findings have led to changes in Yale's approval plan profiles and have informed decisions about e-book acquisitions. Like all good analytics projects, the data also led us to ask more questions about community engagement with collections.

Attendees will learn about our assessment model and have the opportunity to pose questions about the data and user engagement.

This session is co-authored by Julie Linden, Associate Director of Collection Development, Yale University Library and Sarah Tudesco, Assessment Librarian, Yale University Library, who were unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Dollar

Daniel Dollar

Director of Collection Development, Yale University Library
Daniel Dollar is the Director of Collection Development for the Yale University Library. As the library’s chief collection development officer, Daniel leads and coordinates collection activities in all formats, and manages the collection development budget. In addition, he represents... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

From One to Many: Creating a Culture of Research Reputation Management
Faculty and the institutions they work for have increasingly strong needs to manage their research reputations. Syracuse University Libraries assists individuals and institutional offices in determining metrics such as the H index, citation counts, altmetrics, etc. and provides context to these metrics. The first presenter will illustrate how the Libraries provide assistance in managing one's individual research reputation using subscription based and freely available tools. The second presenter will outline how institutional wide reputation is being cultivated in cooperation with other campus units. Lastly, the third presenter will discuss the value of and how a subscription based vendor is vital to helping individual researchers and institutions increase their research reputation.

All three presenters will outline the resources needed to develop these tools and services - within the libraries, within the university, and while working with a subscription based vendor. They will discuss the challenges of capturing research output beyond traditional scholarly communication methods in these systems. Lastly they will share recommendations for developing research reputation management services at your own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Hill

Jennifer Hill

Customer Consultant, Elsevier
Jennifer Hill is a Consultant with Elsevier Research Intelligence, where she is responsible for ensuring value and use of solutions / products through customer training; and for increasing user engagement by providing reliable data and information to help improve an institution’s... Read More →
avatar for Anne Rauh

Anne Rauh

Head of Collections and Research Services, Syracuse University Libraries
Anne E. Rauh is the Head of Collections and Research Services at Syracuse University Libraries. She leads the collection activities, the subject liaison work, and the university aligned research initiatives of the Libraries. She holds a B.A. in International Studies and a M.A. in... Read More →
avatar for Scott Warren

Scott Warren

Associate Dean for Research Excellence, Syracuse University Libraries
Scott is the Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship at the Syracuse University Libraries. He provides strategic guidance for collection management, scholarly communication, and subject liaison librarian services. The department he leads plays a pivotal role in enhancing research... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

How Readers Discover Content in Scholarly Publications
The results of our large scale survey (n=40443) into researcher discovery behavior sheds a great deal of light on the adoption of library technologies by readers, by job role, sector, country, and region. They show the gulf between search resources used by librarians and those selected by their patrons in North America. In addition we can see to what extent institutional repositories are seen as a resource for scholars and can look forward to how recent changes in results display within Google Scholar may change the balance of where readers download journal articles.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Inger

Simon Inger

Consultant, Renew Publishing Consultants
Simon Inger has been working in journals since 1987, when he joined B.H.Blackwell, the Oxford-based subscription agent. In late 1994 he founded CatchWord, the world's first journal platform service provider and ran that business until its acquisition by Ingenta in 2001 (now Publishing... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

If You Can't Beat 'Em, Join 'Em: Embracing Alternative Avenues of Discovery

In our information-rich world, students and faculty can easily find a wealth of content through a wide range of discovery tools, often bypassing the library entirely or only coming back to the library inadvertently as the result of a successful search. The 2015 Horizon Library report has continued to identify this "Competition from Alternative Avenues of Discovery" as a difficult challenge. Libraries can either cede their traditional role in facilitating discovery or can embrace the potential of these new tools. Building on a session at this year's ER&L Conference, this session will explore how libraries can broaden their approach to discovery by enhancing single-search discovery services to better compete with other tools while simultaneously embracing the potential of new tools and technology to allow users a range of discovery options. This program will explore ways in which library discovery services can be optimized to provide easy access to owned, subscribed, and curated content, whatever the source; how a publishers can study usage patterns to maximize discovery and access; and how libraries can take advantage of innovative new tools and approaches to discovery.


Speakers
avatar for Bob Boissy

Bob Boissy

Director, Institutional Marketing and Account Development, Springer Nature
avatar for Michael Levine-Clark

Michael Levine-Clark

Dean, University of Denver
avatar for Ido Peled

Ido Peled

Corp VP, Mobile Campus Solutions, Ex Libris


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

If You Ease the DRM, Will They Read?
This paper examines changes in readership of Canadian presses Ebooks due to the removal of restrictions by the publishers (DRM).

In 2013, the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) and 12 members of the Association of Canadian University Presses/Association Des Presses Universitaires Canadiennes (ACUP/APUC), in conjunction with eBOUND Canada, partnered to provide access via OCUL's Scholars Portal (SP) books platform. The license agreement included a section on Digital Rights Management (DRM) that asked SP to provide access control technologies to limit the use of content and devices. However, the license agreement also included a commitment by publishers to review DRM restrictions on an annual basis and gradually limit them.

Three years into the agreement and several publishers had already removed the restrictions for over two hundred titles. Titles that initially were loaded onto Adobe Content Server (ACS, the technology selected to enforce the DRM) and were limited to one user at a time, are now available with no restrictions.

Our paper will present the results of measuring use for titles that were moved out of the ACS and put onto the SP non-DRM platform. It will examine whether it is true to assume, as one often may, that DRM e-books do not encourage e-reading; has the use of titles no longer restricted by ACS really increased? Finally, it will discuss our strategy to overcome the difference in methods for measuring readership across platforms and technologies, in order to look at the use of specific titles.

Speakers
avatar for Ravit H. David

Ravit H. David

Ebook Service Coordinator, Scholars Portal Univ. of Toronto
Ravit H. David is the Coordinator of the E-book service in Scholars Portal, at the University of Toronto. In her current role Ravit works with vendors and publishers to provide access and discoverability to E-Books with perpetual access rights. Ravit serves on several international... Read More →
SK

Sadia Khwaja

Senior Developer, Scholars Portal, University of Toronto


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Librarians, Publishers, and Aggregators - The New Collaborators
Librarians, publishers and aggregators are collaborating more today than ever before. As demand for streamlined approaches to licensing of content increases and content types evolve libraries, publishers and content aggregators have been working together to develop solutions for licensing content to enhance research and scholarly collaboration.

Consider eBooks and eJournals, fragmentation of content into individual articles, images, video and more. The advent of gray literature such as blogs and tweets as part of the research cycle. This ever-expanding need for content of all types has increased the need to develop tools to enhance research and discovery of the right content no matter the format. And of course there is copyright. Doesn't copyright always factor when licensing content?

This session will update us all on the latest and greatest licensing solutions and include an interactive discussion with the audience to hear what they are adopting, developing or hoping for!

Topics include:





  • How publishers, libraries and aggregators are jointly developing unique content sets that best target the needs of the academic and research community



  • How non-traditional content, like blogs and tweets, are used by library researchers that otherwise would be difficult to discover and collect.



  • The opportunities to license fragments of content including images and video and the value they bring to content creators and consumers



  • The role of copyright-how all this activity can be done legally and easily




Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Consortia Account Manager, Oxford University Press/ Previously at UNC Greensboro
Beth works for Oxford University Press as a Consortia Account Manager. Before coming to OUP she was the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at UNC Greensboro. Beth has served as the Principle Program Director for the Charleston Conference since... Read More →
EC

Edward Colleran

Partner, Triumvirate Content Consultants
avatar for Steven Heffner

Steven Heffner

Director of Product Strategy, Health Learning, Research & Practice, Wolters Kluwer
Steven Heffner has been involved in publishing information for professional audiences for almost 25 years, a career that spans the transition from print to digital and includes editorial and management roles in scholarly publishing and business information. He led the business intelligence... Read More →
avatar for Larry Schwartz

Larry Schwartz

President, ACI Information Group
ACI Scholarly Blog Index is a research database currently available for academic libraries and research institutions in one-year and multi-years subscriptions. ACI's audience is students, librarians, and faculty looking for up-to-date commentary and opinion on scholarly topics. When... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Open Access and Open Data, Rolling with the Times: Case Studies of Librarians Helping Authors and Institutions Comply
As mandates for open access expand beyond publications into open data, librarians continue to play a central role. This panel will include representative case studies around the variety of roles librarians assume in helping both the authors and their institution remain in compliance. Librarian contributions include interpreting funder policies and publisher offerings, researching and/or making available financial resources to support open efforts, advocacy, ensuring authors make the right choice to meet their funders' requirements, overseeing payments, and handling deposition to institutional and funder required repositories. Through key exemplar cases, this panel seeks to provide a common understanding of the variety of roles librarians have come to play in an open world, to identify challenges they continue to face in their efforts, and to share solutions to those problems.

Moderators
avatar for Darla Henderson

Darla Henderson

Publisher & Asst Director, American Chemical Society

Speakers
avatar for Amy Hodge

Amy Hodge

Science Data Librarian, Stanford University Libraries
avatar for Erja Kajosalo

Erja Kajosalo

Collections Specialist & Chemistry Librarian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Mira Waller

Mira Waller

Department Head, Research Engagement, Libraries, North Carolina State University



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Reimagining the Library: Relationships between Library Collections, Space and Public Services
What defines the library - the collections or the services? How do libraries stay relevant and respond to users' needs? Ask any group of users and one can expect an equally diverse response based on the premise of what the need of the moment is. Increasingly, academic and public libraries are creating new service points to help users develop fresh or different skills. As the diversity of communities increase due to immigration, social change, demographic shifts, the role of the library increases, too. The Makerspace and Gaming Studios, technical writing and resume labs, outdoor reading spaces and collaborative work spaces, in addition to the range of public events and exhibitions taking place in libraries expands the scope and reach of both campus and community services. Equally important, these service areas bridge the role libraries have with other academic and civic units and businesses within the community. Being responsive at the time of need is among the challenges libraries face in the planning and execution of new services that build on collection strengths and directions. Digital natives have different needs and expectations of libraries and using social media to increasingly connect with users has seen profound advantages. Many successful marketing and communications strategies and examples that promote libraries and their collections and services will be shared by creative staff from the Rotterdam Public Library and the University of California, Irvine Libraries that will showcase the links between the discovery of collections and services and the diverse communities they serve.

Speakers
avatar for Charla Batey

Charla Batey

Communications & Events Officer, University of California, Irvine Libraries
Charla Batey, MBA, is the Communications and Events Officer for the UCI Libraries, where she oversees and directs strategic communications, marketing, public and media relations and special events. She is also member of the Libraries’ External Relations Team, and UCI's Community... Read More →
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies... Read More →
TK

Theo Kemperman

Director, Bibliotheek Rotterdam


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Shotgun Session: Collection Development Analysis and Assessment Thread
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1. Setting our "sites" on a tiered collection: One major health care system's rapid expansion (Laura Schimming)

Institutional mergers and affiliation changes occur rapidly, especially in health care, and librarians should be equipped to respond to these changes in library collections, user populations, and budgets.  When Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai combined with a health network of four large teaching hospitals in 2014, Mount Sinai's Levy Library was suddenly charged with providing library access for four new hospital sites, including a huge increase in the number of faculty, nurses, and resident physicians.  

This presentation will discuss institutional affiliation changes from the library's perspective, including the Levy Library's process of building library access for a greatly expanded user base and additional hospital sites "from the ground up."  This project included efforts to extend existing library subscriptions to additional sites, remove duplicate spending, negotiate with vendors to leverage current spend levels, manage 5 different budgets, and communicate with stakeholders.  This presentation will also examine the library's ultimate decision to create a two-tiered library collection, including one tier for academic users and one for hospital users.
 
2. The Stratigraphy of Subject Liaison Work: Using Data Visualization as the Bedrock for Faculty-informed Collection Development (Stephanie Hess)
 
As subject liaisons, we frequently gather input from faculty members in our assigned departments to help inform collection development decisions. Faculty expertise paired with the cost data and usage statistics harvested by librarians offers us a better overall picture of the true value and impact of a particular journal title or database when managing our print and digital subscriptions. However, engaging faculty members in such conversations can be quite challenging. 

Data visualization can help drum up dialogues about collections, particularly in disciplines which rely heavily on modelling. For example, upon inheriting the environmental studies, geology, and map subjects at Binghamton University, I received a lengthy Excel spreadsheet of journals ranked by the faculty that included pricing, fund codes, and usage statistics from 2003-2008.  After adding missing years of data, I uploaded the revised file to our electronic resource management system which acts as the central repository for recording commentary by librarians and faculty.

This approach created a rich, multi-layered data deposit, ready to be excavated in order to build interactive models to share with geology faculty when discussing collections decisions. Ideally, presenting data in more exciting formats will help facilitate the annual review of library resources purchased with geology funds and assist with budget justifications as necessary. Possessing a limited science background, I hope to garner new faculty input so as to better assess and expand our extant geology collection, thereby ensuring that the Binghamton University Libraries continues to meet the ongoing research needs of its geology faculty and students. 
 
3. Create Impact with Data Visualization (Kathleen Bauer) 

Making an effective argument about the library collection and its use is key to winning backing for the collection budget, but it can difficult to attract and hold people's interest when giving them a lot of information about a collection. This challenge is complicated by the complex, large amount of data that are used to describe the collection and its use.  Data that need to be communicated include pricing, size, rate of growth, and use. These data need to be further explored by subject and format. Conveying this information can require many dense tables of data, which most people do not have the desire or time to read and digest. Charts can also be used, but traditional charts are static and do not allow the user to select data to explore in depth.  People are more interested when data are presented in attractive ways that are meaningful to them. Used well, data visualization is a great tool that can make it possible to present complex data in a concise and understandable manner.  Tableau, a web-based data visualization software, can be used to create a small number of charts with high impact that bring together many types of data. Because charts created in Tableau are web-based and interactive, they can be designed to give a single, high-level view of data, while also letting the individual viewer select more granular, detailed views.  This talk will show Tableau charts used by one academic library to successfully argue for budget increases. 

4. Designing Adaptable Tools for In-House User Studies (Alison Bradley, Rachael Winterling)

This session will provide a brief update on the work of the Charlotte Initiative's User Experience research team, comprised of 15 members representing 11 institutions, who are researching the ways libraries and publishers evaluate user experience with eBook collections in academic libraries. During summer 2016, the group is designing user studies and focus groups to conduct in-person assessments of user experience with eBooks in academic library settings. After testing the materials at multiple institutions, the group hopes to openly share replicable materials like task lists and question prompts that will allow individuals at other institutions to develop their own customized studies. The goal of this project is to develop a toolkit that institutions can utilize to conduct assessments of eBook platforms with a multitude of user groups.The session will provide updates on the first round of user tests, and give advice on collaborating across institutions as well as on designing and adapting appropriate criteria for user studies in-house. A complete update on the results of the project will be provided at an open conference in Charlotte in Spring 2017, and the toolkit will be made publicly available at that time as well.
 
5) Adding and Slashing Serials (Zeb Evelhoch)

This presentation will be two-fold and discuss how during a time of stagnating budgets and raising journal costs, Central Washington University Brooks Library evaluated and added popular print magazines and worked with faculty to eliminate redundant and low use journals. The process of identifying the need, researching, evaluating and gaining student input for popular magazines to be added to a recently opened coffee shop will be the first topic covered. Secondly, this presentation will cover how the library identified journal titles received in multiple formats and low use/high cost titles, then worked with faculty to change access models to realize a net savings. Participants can gain insight on how to identify low use and repetitive titles as well as how to gain feedback from students for creating a popular magazine collection and work with faculty on access changes. 

Moderators
avatar for Cris Ferguson

Cris Ferguson

Assistant Dean of Libraries / Associate Professor, Murray State University

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Bauer

Kathleen Bauer

Director Collections, Discovery and Access Services, Trinity College (Hartford, Connecticut)
avatar for Alison Bradley

Alison Bradley

Director, Strategic Initiatives, PALCI
avatar for Stephanie Hess

Stephanie Hess

Electronic Resources Librarian, Binghamton University (SUNY)
Stephanie P. Hess has worked in a variety of Technical Services positions since 1998. She is currently the Electronic Resources Librarian at Binghamton University (SUNY) and possesses an extensive background in acquisitions, cataloging, collection development, and serials managem... Read More →
avatar for Laura Schimming

Laura Schimming

Assistant Director, Levy Library, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
avatar for Rachael Winterling

Rachael Winterling

Usability Coordinator, UNC Charlotte



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Supporting Research Information Management in the Research University: Partnerships, Challenges, and Possibilities
Research universities are increasingly engaging in complex efforts to collect and synthesize information about an institution's research footprint. The collection, updating, and sharing of the campus' bibliographic research outputs is an increasingly important part of this effort, as institutions seek to develop external profiling systems and enable collaborator discovery and to also increasingly internally understand the research strengths and synergies of an institution for planning and assessment. Institutions are adopting a variety of tools to support research information management (RIM), faculty activity reporting (FAR), and researcher collaboration and discovery on campus. In this presentation, we will talk about the complex and enterprise wide institutional environment in which this research information management effort is taking place, including an overview of the multiple stakeholders: libraries, research offices, colleges and departments, provosts, and many others. The University of Illinois and Virginia Tech University will provide in-depth case studies about their own campus efforts, talking specifically about campus partnerships, RIM products, bibliographic data sources and gaps, implementation challenges, and faculty engagement. We will conclude with a discussion about the opportunities for greater interoperability between siloed campus systems that collect bibliographic metadata, and the important and evolving role of the library in this emerging and poorly defined community of practice.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Bryant

Rebecca Bryant

Senior Program Officer, OCLC Research
Rebecca Bryant, PhD, serves as Senior Program Officer at OCLC Research where she leads collaborative research in conjunction with OCLC Research Library Partner (ORLP) libraries, related specifically to research information management (RIM) and research data management support ser... Read More →
avatar for Beth Namachchivaya

Beth Namachchivaya

Associate University Librarian for Research, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
JS

Julie Speer

Associate Dean for Research and Informatics, Virginia Tech



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

The Big Picture: A Holistic Viewpoint of E-book Acquisitions
This presentation details the complete process map of e-book acquisitions at Loyola Marymount University's William H. Hannon Library. In this presentation, we extend and update the model used by Beisler & Kurt (2012) for current workflow considerations. In particular, we will highlight an expansion of the paths that an e-book can take, discuss the improvement of discoverability through cataloging services and review, and look at quality control techniques such as access and link checking. 

Objective of the session: While most literature focuses on certain aspects of e-book workflow, this presentation attempts to portray a holistic viewpoint of e-book acquisitions. By capturing the complexities of the process and visualizing it from the perspective of the big picture, it serves as a guide when writing more detailed procedures, helps us recognize appropriate staffing to perform a task, and it shows how different people interact with one another as part of the process. 

What attendees can expect to learn: Attendees will engage with a complete workflow procedure for the different paths of e-book acquisitions. By attending this presentation, participants may identify a component of this workflow they could implement at their own institutions to improve user satisfaction with e-books. Through audience participation, we hope to create a wider discussion to learn what others in the room are doing with their own e-book acquisitions workflow.

Speakers
avatar for Marie Kennedy

Marie Kennedy

Serials & Electronic Resources Librarian, Loyola Marymount University
I'm the co-director of the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship and the Serials & Electronic Resources Librarian at Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles CA).
avatar for Ron Lewis

Ron Lewis

Acquisitions Librarian, Loyola Marymount University


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

The Right Stuff at the Right Cost and for the Right Reasons
As libraries look to surface unique special collections, or preserve/replace deteriorating print resources with more durable and functional digital surrogates, it is important to come to grips with the pros and cons of a variety of available strategies for achieving library goals. The default strategy has been to let commercial interests take the lead in developing and managing this content; libraries then deciding to buy or not buy based on perceived local interest.  Increasingly, though, we're seeing experimentation with other models that give the library community greater control over selection decisions, standards for digitization, long-term archiving, and terms for accessibility.  The following business models will be considered with an eye to building a higher degree of support for library and user friendly strategies for building significant digital corpora:


  • Locally funded and maintained digitization with post-hoc aggregation of metadata in initiatives like DPLA

  • Library-led and communally funded initiatives like the Text Creation Partnership

  • Agency partnerships with entities like Reveal Digital that can help prioritize, fund, digitize, and aggregate open-access digital resources.  



These and related business models speak to the aspiration of many libraries to find more sustainable approaches to making archival resources more globally visible, accessible and useful.  Participating panelists will speak to the relative merits and limitations of emerging strategies for curating library special collections.

Moderators
avatar for Mark Sandler

Mark Sandler

Consultant, Novel Solutions
Novel Solutions provides consulting services and project support for research libraries and scholarly publishers. Typical projects cover such activities as product development; board or staff meeting facilitation; visioning exercises and strategic planning; sales, marketing and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Frick

Rachel Frick

Business Development Director, DPLA
Community builder with experience in network building, creative problem solving and outreach. Strong believer in the power of librarians to influence change and build stronger, knowledgeable, empowered communities. Passionate advocate for open culture and it potential transformative... Read More →
avatar for Peggy Glahn

Peggy Glahn

Director, Reveal Digital, Reveal Digital
I collaborate with scholarly institutions to expand access to archives and special collections in the humanities. At Reveal Digital, we are committed to changing the publishing paradigm for libraries. Our approach brings together libraries that own special collections of interest... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Rhind-Tutt

Stephen Rhind-Tutt

President, Alexander Street Press
Rhind-Tutt has worked in electronic publishing for libraries for more than 27 years. Before co-founding Alexander Street Press in 2000, he worked for Gale, Proquest/Chadwyck-Healey, and SilverPlatter in a number of different roles. During that time he was responsible for the creation... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Welzenbach

Rebecca Welzenbach

Director, Strategic Integration and Partnerships at Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

The World of ISSN - Standards Revisions and Related Projects
This session will provide updates to several ongoing projects of interest to the library, publisher and vendor communities, including the International ISSN Centre-Ulrich's ISSN project, the revision of ISO-8, the revision of the ISSN Standard (ISO-3297), and an IEEE project to improve the ISSN in their metadata. Attendees will learn which national centers are participating in the ISSN IC-Ulrich's project and how that project benefits the greater community of scholarly publishers and users of scholarly information. There will be a discussion about the project plan and progress of the ISO-8 revision (Presentation of Periodicals) which is related to ISSN and the NISO PIE-J Recommended Practice. The status of and details about the proposed ISSN Standard Revision will also be included. Rounding out the program will be information from IEEE regarding their work on a project to improve the inclusion of ISSN in the metadata that accompanies the periodical and conference serials files they send to various services and providers. There will be time for discussion and questions on any or all of these topics.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Kaplan

Laurie Kaplan

Sr. Project Manager, ProQuest
Laurie Kaplan, as Director of Editorial Operations at ProQuest, facilitates efforts of the international database and the Serials Provider Relations teams. Throughout her career of over a decade at ProQuest, Laurie has successfully directed the international data team responsible... Read More →
avatar for Regina Reynolds

Regina Reynolds

Director, U.S. ISSN Center; Head, ISSN Section, Library of Congress
Regina Romano Reynolds is director of the U.S. ISSN Center and head of the ISSN Section at the Library of Congress. She was a member of the U.S. RDA Test Coordinating Committee and co-chaired the internal LC group that recommended LC projects based on the report of the Working Group... Read More →
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Senior Manager, Discovery Partners, IEEE
Julie Zhu cultivates and manages effective working relationships with Discovery Service, Link Resolver, Proxy Service and Search Engine providers to maximize IEEE content findability, visibility and accessibility in multiple discovery channels. She serves in NISO’s Information Discovery... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Understanding the Wider Impact of Scholarly Research with New Metrics
The last six years have seen an enormous explosion both in the availability of new metrics, and in the interest in emergent types of scholarly output. Altmetrics, socio-economic indicators and many other indicators are vying for your attention; funders and policy-makers are increasingly considering how to use metrics in their decision-making.

Are altmetrics are at risk of becoming just another number that faculty shoehorn into their tenure dossiers, selecting the numbers that make them look the best?

Our four speakers will present new ideas and approaches understanding issues of wider impact, which will be followed by a question and answer session.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Coates

Heather Coates

Digital Scholarship & Data Management Librarian, IUPUI University Library
Heather Coates is the Digital Scholarship and Data Management Librarian at the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship. She provides research data and research metrics services, manages the campus data repository, engages in research data policy development, and supports... Read More →
avatar for William Gunn

William Gunn

Director of Scholarly Communications, Mendeley
Dr. William Gunn is the Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley, a research management tool for collaboration and discovery. Dr. Gunn attended Tulane University as a Louisiana Board of Regents Fellow, receiving his Ph.D in Biomedical Science from the Center for Gene Therapy at Tulane... Read More →
avatar for Helen Josephine

Helen Josephine

Head of the Engineering Library, Stanford University
Helen Josephine is the Head Librarian at the Terman Engineering Library at Stanford University. She is the subject liaison and bibliographer for the School of Engineering departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Electrical Engineering, and Management Science and Engineering... Read More →
avatar for Mike Taylor

Mike Taylor

Head of Metrics Development, Digital Science
Mike is Head of Metrics Development at Digital Science. Mike is an innovator in scholarly metrics and social impact. Since getting involved in altmetrics in 2011, Mike has written several papers on the subject, conducted much research and is working towards a PhD with Mike Thelwall... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

We'll Do It Live: Building Access to Video Content Based on Freedoms of Use
Film collections in academic libraries, including streaming video and DVDs, serve a variety of user populations and needs. Videos are used by faculty as part of instruction, by student clubs or other groups as part of public programming, and by individuals for personal study or entertainment. These various use situations are addressed by the Copyright Act and license agreements that accompany video purchases. To maximize use of video collections (and by extension, funds expended on video collections), libraries need to fully understand their rights under the law, track video licenses, and build access around freedoms to stream and publicly display videos. The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida undertook a project to identify videos acquired with public performance or streaming licenses and better communicate the existence and meaning of these licenses to users. This project included new workflows for cataloging and acquisitions, training for library faculty and staff on uses of video allowed under the Copyright Act and when a license should be obtained, and development of a front-end search and browsing discovery interface for users to find video content by public performance and streaming rights. Audience members will learn how to acquire, catalog, and build access to video content based on freedoms of use.

Speakers
avatar for Aimee Barrett

Aimee Barrett

Print & Media Unit Manager, University of Florida
avatar for Christine Fruin

Christine Fruin

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Florida
avatar for Allison Jai O'Dell

Allison Jai O'Dell

Metadata Librarian, University of Florida
Allison works in technical services for special collections and archives. Her research and development projects focus on metadata, Linked Data, and front-end Web development. Details and CV: http://www.allisonjai.com
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

Chair, Acquisitions & Collections Services, University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Achieving the Holy Grail of Electronic Resource Management with Automated Holdings Feeds
Libraries face many challenges with maintaining electronic resource holdings that are constantly changing. In this session, attendees will learn how libraries, a content provider and a knowledge base are working together to ensure accurate, up-to-date holdings via automated, institution-specific feeds that save libraries both time and frustration.

Library panelists will share their e-resource challenges and lessons learned followed by publisher/partner perspectives outlining what it takes to create and share these feeds.
Be sure to join the conversation that follows and learn how automated holdings maintenance is a win-win-win for everybody!

Speakers
avatar for Antje Mays

Antje Mays

Director of Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries
Antje Mays, Director of Collections at University of Kentucky Libraries, leads collection management efforts in support of the University's growing academic programs and research activities. An experienced linguist, translator, and interpreter, she also serves as academic liaison... Read More →
avatar for Jozef Paulik

Jozef Paulik

Sr. Product Manager, Platform Integration, Elsevier
avatar for Jody Stroh

Jody Stroh

Product Manager, Metadata Services, OCLC



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Albatross: Rolling on a Sea of Data
In this session we will discuss the creation of a database for the purpose of pulling together journal usage data and cost data in a central environment where the data can be queried to use in return on investment analysis. Our database is named "Albatross" referencing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, it is both an omen of good or bad luck and represents the challenges and triumphs our team experienced in development.

We will share some of the challenges encountered while designing the database structure and creating a working database from the design. We will then discuss issues related to normalizing the data and our processes for creating effective workflows. We will also discuss the skill sets of the individuals who contributed to the creation process.

In examining the design process, we will share and walk through our final entity relational diagram and the reasoning behind why it is structured as it is. We will also explore our method of automating workflows through scripting in SQL and Python. In addition, we will talk about the normalization of five years of COUNTER and non-standard journal usage data, standardizing titles, packages, publishers, and platforms.

Finally, we will discuss our plans for assessment, analysis, and visualization of data retrieved from our database. This will be a look at future plans for using LibInsight to publish and create access to this data while allowing the curated data to be further paired with other data for more in depth analysis.

Speakers
avatar for Annette Bailey

Annette Bailey

Assistant Director, Learning Systems & Educational Technology Projects, Virginia Tech
Annette Bailey is currently the Assistant Director for Learning Systems & Educational Technology Projects for the Teaching & Learning Engagement Department at the University Libraries at Virginia Tech. She has recently taken on a new role in supporting the development of High Impact... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Gilmore

Tracy Gilmore

Collections Assessment Librarian, Virginia Tech
Tracy Gilmore is the Collections Assessment Librarian at Virginia Tech University Libraries. She coordinates assessment activities and strategies for developing the library’s digital collections. Her current research interests include discovery service usability, usage, and acc... Read More →
avatar for Anthony Wright de Hernandez

Anthony Wright de Hernandez

Community Collections Archivist, Virginia Tech
Anthony Wright de Hernandez is Community Collections Archivist for University Libraries at Virginia Tech. He is a member of the SAA Finance Committee. He holds an MLIS from the University of Washington iSchool. Anthony works primarily with traditionally marginalized communities to... Read More →
avatar for Leslie O'Brien

Leslie O'Brien

Director, Collections & Technical Services, Virginia Tech
Leslie has held a variety of positions within collections and technical services at Virginia Tech 20+ years. Before that, she worked in special libraries in Washington, DC. She manages collections assessment, metadata creation for the institutional repository, cataloging, interlibrary... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

All About MOOCs: Online Learning is Alive and Well!
Although it may surprise you, MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) are more popular now than ever. Universities that began thinking about MOOCs at the peak of the hype cycle are often just now ready to launch. From lifelong learning to Master's Degree programs, MOOCs have found their place in global education. Come learn what is new in the world of MOOCs, including the innovative programs at Georgia Tech that are using a MOOC environment to reduce the cost of a degree. Explore options for licensing content for this new form of teaching and learning. Elsevier, Copyright Clearance Center, and ProQuest SIPX are all experienced supplying content into MOOCs with new and interesting models. Learn about student uptake of both free and for-purchase content. Learn how libraries and publishers are handling challenges and opportunities in this new learning space.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bowen

Tim Bowen

Director, Academic Products & Services, Copyright Clearance Center
Tim Bowen is the Director of Academic Products & Services at Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) in Danvers, Massachusetts. He joined Copyright Clearance Center in 2003 and is responsible for the development and management of CCC's pay-per use and annual licensing services for academic... Read More →
avatar for Lori Ostapowicz Critz

Lori Ostapowicz Critz

Assistant Dean, Collections Strategy, Georgia Tech
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Head of Partnerships, MIT Knowledge Futures Group
Heather Staines is Head of Partnerships for the Knowledge Futures Group, building open source infrastructure for publishers and libraries. Her previous roles include positions at Hypothesis, Proquest, SIPX (formerly the Stanford Intellectual Property Exchange), Springer SBM, and Greenwood... Read More →
JV

Jeff Voci

Sales Director, Elsevier


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Apples to Oranges: Comparing Streaming Video Platforms
Librarians rely on an ever-increasing variety of platforms to deliver streaming video content to our patrons. Each platform has unique content and features. The panel is comprised of librarians representing different sized institutions with varied collection development goals. Participants will address some of the many ways librarians can think about the success of video platforms: content, subject usage analysis, return-on-investment, ADA compliance, and more. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and provide additional ideas for ways that librarians can analyze data to help guide collection development decisions for streaming video.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah McCleskey

Sarah McCleskey

Head of Resource & Collection Services, Hofstra University
My units get things to people in ways that are efficient. Whether it's circulation, document delivery, resource sharing, DVDs, streaming licensing ... we deliver content to users using well-honed workflows and secret library magic. We maintain the integrity of our print collection... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Information Systems Librarian, Millersville University
avatar for Krista Higham

Krista Higham

Access Services Librarian, Millersville University
Krista Higham is the Access Services Librarian at Millersville University Library collaborating with support staff in circulation, course reserves, stacks maintenance, interlibrary loan, and resource sharing. She is the copyright representative from Millersville to the University... Read More →
avatar for Steven Milewski

Steven Milewski

Social Work & Digital Media Technologies Librarian, University of Tennessee Knoxville
Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Works at UT Libraries as the Social Work and Digital Media Technologies Librarian and Library Liaison to the Office of Disability Services
MT

Monique Threatt

Head, Media Services, Indiana University Bloomington



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Assessing Power Relations in the Global Internet: Reading The Intersectional Internet, by S.U. Noble and B.M. Tynes, eds
This book turns a critical lens on the impact of the global Internet, by challenging its capacity to not simply reflect, but define and structure uneven power relations and social values through rapidly evolving  digital technologies, platforms and infrastructures. The fourteen essays in the book, written by leading scholars from various fields of cultural studies allied to information sciences/Library/media studies and the social sciences, adopt an analytical approach and theoretical perspectives, linked to the multi-faceted concept of "intersectionality." This allows the authors to critically investigate the complexities of the multiple differences in the controlling ideologies, identities and outcomes embedded in their own fields of research. 

This presentation will invite librarians and other information specialists to explicitly identify, contextualize and critically assess the impact of these new lines of inquiry on their multi-dimensional work experiences: Internet studies, computer code, resource selection, reference interaction, bibliographic instruction and other research needs of users in an increasingly diverse environment. 

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Professor; COORD/LIBRARIAN, COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT, DePAUW UNIVERSITY
Joyce is an academic librarian (Professor) and Coordinator of Collection Development at DPU, where she has worked for many years. She earned both Ph.D. (French Literature)and MLS degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Her primary services include assessing and selecting... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

E-books and Young Academic Users: What Do We Know?
Academic libraries in the U.S. have witnessed the impressive growth of acquiring e-books. While publishers, vendors, and librarians are still developing and exploring various models of e-book production, service, and acquisition, we approach issues surrounding e-book adoption, usage, and right restrictions by investigating their end users. In this session, we will report findings from a research project that studies undergraduate students' interests, attitudes, and expectations toward e-books accessible via an academic library website. This research includes a questionnaire survey with both closed and open-ended questions, which was administered to 279 undergraduate students (mostly freshmen and sophomore) in a large university in the South.

Attendees of the session can expect to learn about a range of user-related issues. For example, what functions and features of e-books do students consider most important? What are less important? What DRM restrictions are acceptable or unacceptable to these young college students? What are their experiences of and expectations for using e-books licensed by academic libraries? These issues are interesting to multiple audiences: academic librarians can understand their users better and learn new ways of educating users and promoting the usage of e-books; and publishers and vendors can gain a better knowledge of their end users, which may help them design, develop, and produce information products that are more appropriate for young academic users.

This session is co-authored by Kanchan Deosthali, Assistant Professor, College of Business, University of Mary Washington, and Devendra Potnis, Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee - Knoxville, and Rebecca McCusker, SIS Master's Studennt, University of Tennessee, who were unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Xiaohua Zhu

Xiaohua Zhu

Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Dr. Xiaohua (Awa) Zhu is an assistant professor at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Zhu's research focuses on e-resources licensing and management, access rights, digital copyright, open government, and academic libraries.


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Emory University/Georgia Tech Shared Collection
Building on the notion of a shared collection, Emory University and Georgia Tech recently opened the Library Service Center, an offsite library housing general and special collections materials from both libraries.

In this session, we will provide the audience with an overview of the complexity of such a project, specifically addressing the following topics: the cultural similarities and differences of Emory and Georgia Tech; composition of the shared collection and how we built it; how we use ExLibris Primo to enable discovery and requesting; governance, financial, management, and staffing models; delivery and ILL services; the inventory control system; physical building design and preservation features; connection to the Scholars Trust initiative; and plans for going forward with a focus on collaborative collection development and possibilities for new partnerships.

The audience will be able to ask questions and be encouraged to share their own experiences with shared collections and shared facilities.

Speakers
JC

Jeff Carrico

Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication and Access, Georgia Tech
LM

Lars Meyer

Director, Access & Resource Services, Emory University
CS

Charles Spornick

Director, Services Division, Emory University
I am currently the interim head of the Services Division for the Woodruff Library- Emory's main library.   From 2004 through 2012 I was the head of collection management at Emory; from 1995 through 2004 I was the head of library’s Beck Center.   There he worked with worked... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Finding the Right Fit for Article Delivery: Using Resource Sharing Technology to Provide Enhanced Access Options
Libraries are struggling to maintain subscriptions to research materials, and must explore a variety of access options. There are few attractive options for libraries who want to provide access to research materials to users in a way that is cost effective and simple for users. Libraries are caught between subscriptions to large packages of content or article-level purchasing that is either not instant or must allow unmediated access. In the past, Resource Sharing and Interlibrary Loan has helped users gain access to research material far beyond what their libraries could afford as a single institution. Going forward, resource sharing can offer a variety of options for libraries to provide users access to research material in a way that is convenient yet cost effective. Using IDS Logic, a resource sharing software platform designed by SUNY Libraries that integrates with vendor web services, more options for access to research materials are available. IDS Logic automates verification of copyright limitations, determines the best price for purchase from article vendors, and creates user profiles and system configuration that will allow more refined and automated purchasing or borrowing of research articles and other content. IDS Logic connects with web services from OCLC, Reprints Desk, Copyright Clearance Center, Pubmed, and others to automate delivery decisions, and provide virtually instant access to needed articles. This creates another method for libraries to meet the research needs of its users and helps to ensure that the research is delivered in the most seamless and cost effective manner.

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Pritting

Shannon Pritting

Director of Library and Learning Resources, SUNY Polytechnic Institute
Shannon is currently the Library Director at the newly formed SUNY Polytechnic Institute, with sites in Albany and Utica NY. He has held positions in a variety of library areas including Reference, Instruction, Instructional Design, Resource Sharing, and Access Services. He has also... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Getting Selector Buy-in Before the Wrecking Ball Comes
When a new classroom building was approved in late 2014 that would conjoin and extend into Auburn University's Draughon Library, 38,000 square feet of space had to be cleared in a very short time. 400,000 volumes needed to be withdrawn or moved to off-site storage, a move complicated by loss of space in closed stacks due to the installation of a new fire suppression system, promises of a remote storage facility which had yet to be built, no concrete deadlines, and the need to identify and retain materials included in consortial retention agreements.

Space clearing began with a project to remove unneeded duplicate copies which in turn uncovered a multitude of catalog and shelving problems and then evolved into several more projects. All these projects required an extensive time commitment from selectors primarily for input and decision-making skills on titles to be withdrawn or moved to off-site storage. Shifting thousands of books and journals also required manual labor from students, librarians, and staff. None of this would have been possible without buy-in from all library personnel. This presentation details the variety of methods used by Auburn's Collection Team to foster buy-in and keep the project moving toward completion.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Bishop

Barbara Bishop

Librarian for Communication, Journalism & Theatre, Auburn University Libraries
avatar for Adelia Grabowsky

Adelia Grabowsky

Collections Team, Auburn University Libraries
avatar for Liza Weisbrod

Liza Weisbrod

Auburn University
Liza Weisbrod is the Music and Government Information Librarian at Auburn University, where her responsibilities include music collection management, instruction, and reference along with serving as depository coordinator for the government information collection. She is currently... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Implications of BIBFRAME and Linked Data for Libraries & Publishers

While Linked Data is growing in interest in the library and publishing communities, its evolution and adoption is widespread in many industries. Academic libraries and vendors alike have numerous data silos, incapable of communicating effectively with other repositories and/or the broader web. The library community is rife with outdated business models, in part due to data formats and limitations. New ecosystems and integrations will be borne out of transforming these data silos into the broader and more accessible web of data.

BIBFRAME is the planned replacement for MARC, and while the framework is being evolved in working groups such as LD4P and LC, organizations are already beginning to experiment and deploy new business models around it.  Casalini Libri will share their foray into delivering BIBFRAME resources in addition to MARC records for customers. The transformation has begun.

 The Library.Link Network brings together libraries and their providers to inform the Web of their detailed, vetted and authoritative data about art, music, books/ebooks, special collections and more. MARC records are transformed into BIBFRAME resources, assets linked, and then published in a variety of vocabularies to the web for search engines and other applications to consume.  Users finding library resources on the web or other applications can be driven to the institution’s discovery layer for authentication and fulfillment. 

Due to the highly structured data in the library and publisher worlds, these organizations are well positioned to leverage existing data into the BIBFRAME and/or Linked Data realm. 


Speakers
avatar for Dennis Brunning

Dennis Brunning

Arizona State University
avatar for Michele Casalini

Michele Casalini

CEO, Casalini Libri
Michele Casalini is CEO of the family-run company Casalini Libri, which supplies bibliographical data, books and journals to libraries, and offers e-content through the Torrossa platform, thanks to its dedicated Digital Division. Following studies in Modern Languages and Literature... Read More →
avatar for John Richardson

John Richardson

VP of Library & Vendor Partnerships, Zepheira
John Richardson is the Vice President of Library & Vendor Partnerships for Zepheira Technologies (http://zepheira.com) and joined the firm in March 2014. During his 30-year tenure in library automation, he has worked primarily for library automation companies including MultiLIS... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Lifting All Boats: Fostering a Community of Practice for Student Publishers
Undergraduate and graduate students are increasingly being encouraged to work with faculty and researchers to generate traditional scholarship as well as other types of projects that feature original content. Through this process, students are more frequently taking on roles as researchers, authors, and publishers. Student scholarship and student-run publications are valuable to the scholarly record, representing the nascent activities of the next generation of scholars, but also serving as an academic playground for emergent forms of publishing and media. Furthermore, students who manage publications gain practical skills that transfer to a variety of careers in academia and private industry. However, student publications are often struggling and somewhat invisible. They face many of the same sustainability problems affecting the broader publishing industry and unique problems inherent in student publications. These groups frequently need (and often seek) a combination of professional mentorship and a forum for peer group interactions to advance their publishing goals.

At our respective institutions, we continue to be delighted and impressed by the variety and quality of student-generated media, ranging from traditional scholarly journals, to web-based peer-reviewed journals, newspapers, literary, cultural, and political magazines, and more. Libraries, library publishers, and university presses have the expertise and resources needed to help build a community of practice for student publications. Attendees will learn about models for student engagement and library-press collaboration as a librarian, two publishers, and a student editor share their recent experiences and future aspirations in working together to support the vibrant and diverse publications on their campuses.

Speakers
GB

Gillian Berchowitz

Director and Editor-in-Chief, Ohio University Press
MB

Marc Blanc

Founder and Editor-in-Chief, Jettison Magazine, a student-run publication at Ohio University
Marc is an undergraduate in English at Ohio University. In 2015 he helped start Jettison Magazine, an arts and culture publication that remains student-run. Working with university staff and faculty on issues like copyright and distribution, he has developed a sense of what student... Read More →
avatar for Kate Dohe

Kate Dohe

Manager, Digital Programs & Initiatives, University of Maryland Libraries
People can talk to me about digital libraries, open access, library publishing, digital preservation, and approaches to collaboration. You can also talk to me about bikes, if you're so inclined.
avatar for Laura Leichum

Laura Leichum

Digital Publishing and Rights Manager, Georgetown University Press
Laura oversees electronic publishing efforts, manages rights and permissions, and pursues co-publications and translations. In general, her job is all about building partnerships and she is interested in exploring the many ways that content creators and publishers such as the GU Press... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Mapping the Free Ebook Supply Chain
Although still a small part of overall output, the number of open access (OA) books from scholarly publishers is growing rapidly. Traditional publishers are adding OA options (e.g., Luminos from University of California Press), libraries and funders are collaborating to make existing books OA (e.g., Knowledge Unlatched, NEH/Mellon Humanities Open Book Program), and high quality dedicated OA publishers are emerging (e.g., Lever Press, Open Book Publishers, Ubiquity Press). While many of these works are digital facsimiles of print, an increasing number are multimodal publications with extended functionality. Public availability of scholarly information promotes equity and inclusion and advances some key shared objectives of librarians. However, these titles also present challenges to an information supply chain that relies on commercial intermediaries: There is little incentive for jobbers, aggregators, or booksellers to promote books which have no price; it can be difficult for a library to defend spending collections money on publications that will end up freely available to the world; and new digital scholarship formats can be challenging to deliver to patrons and preserve. In this session, join a publisher, an aggregator of open content, and an expert in information retrieval in a journey past the many obstacles between production of an OA book, its discovery and use by a reader, and its long-term preservation. As well as learning about the issues in this emerging space, participants will be invited to suggest practical ways of overcoming barriers to universal and open access to knowledge.

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Welzenbach

Rebecca Welzenbach

Director, Strategic Integration and Partnerships at Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library

Speakers
avatar for Rupert Gatti

Rupert Gatti

Director, Open Book Publishers
Rupert Gatti is a Fellow and Director of Studies in Economics at Trinity College, Cambridge University. He is a co-founder and Director of the award winning Open Access book publishers, Open Book Publishers (www.openbookpublishers.com).  Founded as a non-profit by scholars at Cambridge in 2008, Open Book Publishers has now published over 80 high quality, rigorously peer reviewed scholarly monographs - including works by well know authors such as Amartya Sen and Noam Chomsky - and attracted over 1 million readers world... Read More →
avatar for Eric Hellman

Eric Hellman

President, Free Ebook Foundation
avatar for Jill O'Neill

Jill O'Neill

Director of Content, NISO



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Preservation of Digital Collections and Dark Archives
Long-term preservation of digital collections is a clear charter for libraries, but the path forward is often murky and daunting. Solutions vary due to collection composition, collection file structure, the technical expertise of the teams involved, and budget. Further, there are issues of stewardship, ownership and release of data in a usable form from dark archives. CLOCKSS, Portico and the Digital Preservation Network will come together at Charleston in a panel presentation to share insights into what it takes for libraries to tackle the issue of long-term preservation. We will discuss case studies and solutions that you can put to work. Come join us as we explore the dark side.

Speakers
avatar for Craig Van Dyck

Craig Van Dyck

Executive Director, CLOCKSS Archive
Craig Van Dyck is Executive Director of the CLOCKSS Archive, since November 2015. Previously he was with Wiley for 18 years as VP of Content Management; and with Springer New York for 10 years, most recently as Senior VP and COO.Craig served as Chairman of the Association of American... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Paolillo

Michelle Paolillo

Digital Lifecycle Services Lead, Cornell University
Michelle is Cornell University's Library's Lead for Digital Lifecycle Services. She is invested in the practical logistics of digital preservation (harmonizing workflows, preservation storage, interoperability, systems design, etc.). She also serves as Cornell's HathiTrust coordinator... Read More →
avatar for Greg Suprock

Greg Suprock

Head of Solution Architecture, Apex Covantage
Apex CoVantage provides conversion and prepress services to publishers, academic libraries, and national libraries. We specialize in XML workflows, content digitization, and accessibility.
avatar for Jabin White

Jabin White

VP of Content Management, ITHAKA - JSTOR
Jabin White is Vice President of Content Management for ITHAKA, an organization committed to helping the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways. ITHAKA provides several services to the academic... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Quantifying the Impacts of Investment in Humanities Archives
Demonstrating the value of humanities research databases and special collections for researchers on teaching and research outcomes is a known challenge for libraries globally. There is an increasing need for libraries to understand and communicate the research and teaching value of investment in content, as well as the impacts the content can be shown to have on the quality and quantity of research outcomes.

This talk will share the methods, results and implications for libraries and humanities funding bodies of a joint research project recently commissioned by Jisc, the UK higher education, further education and skills sectors' not-for-profit organisation for digital services and solutions, and ProQuest. The presentation will share usage and citation data across a range of disciplines from long term investments in Early English Books Online (EEBO), the House of Commons Parliamentary Papers, and The New York Times.

Conference participants will also be provided with concrete advice on how to undertake similar studies into their own digital resources.

The Oxford Internet Institute (OII) carried out the work using the methodologies OII developed for the Jisc-funded Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources (TIDSR). Quantitative methods of analytics, bibliometrics, and an in-depth survey of researchers were used to build a detailed picture of the use and profile of these resources. This research was complemented by qualitative data gathered through focus groups and individual interviews.

Speakers
avatar for Eric T. Meyer

Eric T. Meyer

Professor of Social Informatics, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
My research looks at the changing nature of knowledge creation in science, medicine, social science, arts, and humanities as technology is embedded in everyday practices.



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Research in the Real World: Accessibility, Nurturing Usage, and Turning Theory into Practice
Academic research—in every field from business and management to medicine and even librarianship—frequently discovers crucial ways to improve efficacy and efficiency. But that only helps if those findings get applied in practice. The research agenda today is increasingly driven by theory at the expense of practical relevance, while employers need the students they recruit to possess a greater blend of skills. The result instead is content published in a form that fails to resonate with practitioners, students, policy makers, and the wider public who want to understand the ROI of the research investment.

In this session, find out how best to get your existing collections used, not just for study, but to inform the real-world decisions of current and former students; how to acquire and market the right resources to get new actionable research into the hands of those who need it; and how to help your faculty get their scholarly publications noticed by the practitioners, consultants, and other influencers who can ensure their discoveries are widely used and understood.

Combining the perspectives of a global publisher leading the way in practitioner-generated content, a university librarian on the front lines of scholarly communication and discovery, and a business school academic with experience in the field, we will create a foundation for extending the reach and impact of novel, new and ground-breaking research into practical application in the real world.

Speakers
avatar for Patti Davis

Patti Davis

Publisher, Emerald Group Publishing
Patti Davis is a Publisher for Emerald Group Publishing, responsible for the journals in the company’s prestigious Operations, Logistics, and Quality Collection. She has more than 15 years of experience both in books and journals publishing, working previously at Rowman & Littlefield... Read More →
avatar for Michael Groth

Michael Groth

Senior Brand Manager, International, Emerald Publishing
Michael Groth is Senior Brand Manager at Emerald Publishing, where he oversees international brand strategy and implementation across regional markets via digital, social, conference, thought leadership and PR channels. Mike has spent over 20 years in marketing for scholarly publishing... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Ismail

Matthew Ismail

Director of Collection Development, Central Michigan University Libraries
TK

Thomas Kent

Professor, College of Charleston



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Seeing that Students Succeed: Rising Expectations and the Library's Role in Teaching and Learning
"Interest in supporting students and their competencies and learning outcomes shows signs of surging." This was one of the most significant findings of Ithaka S+R's latest US Faculty Survey. Other research has found that library directors agree almost unanimously about the importance of their library supporting teaching and learning. In recent years, expectations have increased not only for the library to demonstrate its impact on students but for universities to increase retention, progression, graduation, and later-life outcomes. Ebsco's User Research Group has studied student research practices and the challenges they face, as well as the kinds of librarian-faculty partnerships that are effective in supporting students. This session will share research findings principally from the US, but also from the UK and China, to address the strategic engagements that libraries can make today to contribute directly to student success.

Speakers
avatar for Roger Schonfeld

Roger Schonfeld

Director of Libraries, Scholarly Communications, and Museums, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Previously, Roger was a research associate at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He received degrees... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Shotgun Session: Collection Development - Demand Driven Acquisition and E-Book Threads
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1. We used DDA to help build a new engineering collection; you won't believe what happened next 
(Aaron Lupton)

Engineering students want up to date, highly technical information delivered to their devices immediately, so a highly specialized eBook collection is vital for any engineering library. But, engineering eBooks are expensive so "just in case" collection building is not an ideal solution, particularly when building a brand new collection. The introduction of new engineering programs at York University meant new challenges and opportunities for the Libraries, namely building a new collection for these new programs. We started with general eBook packages as well as engineering publisher packages then turned to Demand Driven Acquisition (DDA), Short-Term Loan,  and Evidence Based Selection to fill in the gaps in our current licensed eBook collections. Our goal was to build a quality engineering collection while avoiding the purchase of large numbers of "just in case" print or eBook titles. 

This session will describe how York executed its new Engineering DDA, STL, and Evidence Based Selection programs; how successful these tools were in building a quality collection, as well as the Return on Investment (ROI) of the eBooks selected. The presenters will offer recommendations on how these tools are most effectively integrated with other collection building tools. Just as important, this session will include a discussion on the role of DDA in the traditional collection building process, taking into account that not all eBooks are available via this method, and how DDA can be used to augment a librarian's deeper integration into the engineering curriculum. 
 
2. Rolling with PDA & DDA: How Academic Libraries can use Patron Driven and Demand Driven Acquisition Techniques to Build Library Collections with a Minimal Management & Budget (Kerry Falloon) 

Patron Driven and Demand Driven Acquisitions has been utilized for some time in academic libraries but some university libraries are still new to the process. With changes in the last couple of years regarding short-term monograph loans becoming cost-ineffective, the popularity of streaming video PDA, and library budgets increasingly being cut, the conundrum of successfully implementing a PDA program and how to evaluate its effectiveness, is a question many still library's face. In the Fall of 2015, the College of Staten Island Library-CUNY, implemented a small DDA monograph pilot program with YBP/ EBSCO e-books to build its collections in academic areas new to the college. The goal was to offer patrons immediate "on demand" selections in areas that might need additional collection building in depth and breath, but this will take some to accomplish by collection development librarians. The results of this DDA pilot project, as well as the implementation by the Fall of 2016, of a PDA streaming video program with Kanopy, will be discussed. Both pilot projects were completed with a total budget of $5,000 committed to each. With budget cuts of over a hundred thousand in the year proceeding the implementation of these projects, this poster will discuss "small budget and manageable" PDA and DDA programs, which was in direct contrast to a larger scale CUNY DDA project, which the College of Staten Island (CSI) benefitted from in 2014. The shortfalls of the PDA/ DDA pilot projects, lessons learned, and future prospects at CSI’s library considered will also be discussed.              

3. What's On Demand?: Analyzing Demand-Driven Acquisition of eBooks (Paolo Gujilde, Jessica Minihan)

What happens to DDA ebooks after their initial use? Will they be used again? Does it represent the library collection? The landscape of acquisition models in which libraries negotiate are changing with the times to accommodate the reality of budgetary concerns and providing a traditionally balanced library collection. Academic libraries like ours, Zach S. Henderson Library (Georgia Southern University), which employs demand-driven acquisition must find an equilibrium between needs and wants. The "needs" of funding and the "wants" of having it all just in case. Henderson Library implemented subject-specific DDA electronic books program in 2011 to support online education programs and to supplement the traditional automatic approval plan. Then, in 2015, the Library fully expanded the DDA program to all subject areas as well as print format. These changes marked the move from the traditional automatic approval plan to DDA plan. 

In this presentation, we will trace the Library's DDA ebook usage statistics and generate trends that reveal effectiveness, or lack thereof, of the DDA program specifically as it pertains to electronic books. Attendees of this session will leave with better understanding of issues of collection development and acquisitions as it relates to DDA.  

4. Post-Acquisition Management and the Issue of Inaccessibility (Beth Caruso) 

Though advocates are calling for publishers to develop born-accessible eBooks to comply with ADA and DAISY standards and the EPUB 3.0 measures now backed by the Society for Disability Studies, the realistic timespan for this achievement to become standard practice is far from ideal. To equitably serve users who are differently able, stronger technology and a mindset toward accessibility must become the standard in electronic collections. Librarians are expected to have a strong working knowledge of the library's collections but receive little training in best practices for assisting patrons who are differently able. We cannot wait for the eBook landscape to change on its own, as responses to inaccessibility have largely been that the technology simply was not applied to the desired text. In the meantime, we must recognize  how to develop usable collections for all and how to respond to those whose access has been limited.This research is the product of both current research and earlier findings of the User Experience Research Team from the Mellon-funded Charlotte Initiative project. Though a quick overview of the team's findings thus far will be provided, this session will focus on the accessible eBook landscape and provide librarians with tools to better assist users working independently in discovery systems as they interact with the library's current acquisitions. Additionally, librarians will acquire techniques for responding to users who cannot use the texts they wish and understand how such a mindset can help us develop stronger collections of use to all. 

5.  Open Access, open access, how does your catalog grow? With selection, access, and usage all in a virtual row (David Schuster, Susan Martin)

Much of the Open Access focus and discussion has been on journals (think Glossa). But, the open access monograph has come fully into its own. University and scholarly publishers are providing high quality books, often in areas that rely on long-form scholarship. However, open access monographs present a challenge to libraries of all sizes. How do they fit into the traditional models of selection, acquisition, cataloging, and tracking usage?  

This session will present the open access monograph workflow from selection to usage assessment used at the Texas Woman's University Libraries.  Attendees will learn how a small university library implemented and normalized the workflow for the selection, processing, and usage assessment of open access monographs.

Moderators
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Consortia Account Manager, Oxford University Press/ Previously at UNC Greensboro
Beth works for Oxford University Press as a Consortia Account Manager. Before coming to OUP she was the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at UNC Greensboro. Beth has served as the Principle Program Director for the Charleston Conference since... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Beth Caruso

Beth Caruso

Technology Services Coordinator, Atkins Library, UNC Charlotte
Beth Caruso is from New Orleans, but currently lives in Charlotte, NC. After she graduated with her MA in English, she taught writing at the college level and was the Associate Director of the UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center. She graduated with her MLIS in May of 2017, and... Read More →
avatar for Prof Kerry Falloon

Prof Kerry Falloon

Acquisitions Librarian, CUNY- College of Staten Island
With over a decade of experience in academic libraries, my prior positions included Acquisitions & Collection Development librarian at Saint Peter's University, Administrator of Technical Services at Ocean County Community College and currently, Assistant Professor & Acquisitions... Read More →
avatar for Paolo P. Gujilde

Paolo P. Gujilde

Assistant Head of Acquisitions, Northwestern University
avatar for Aaron Lupton

Aaron Lupton

Electronic Resources Librarian, York University
I have been the Electronic Resources Librarian at York University in Toronto since 2009. I am involved in negotiating licenses and purchases of all electronic materials in York's collections. I also have an interest in all matters pertaining to assessment, especially collections assessment... Read More →
avatar for Susan Martin

Susan Martin

Chair, Collection Development and Management, Middle Tennessee State University
Susan Martin serves as the Collection Development and Management department chair in the James E. Walker Library at Middle Tennessee State University. Immediately prior to this position, she served as the Head of Acquisitions Services at The University of Chicago Library. Her other... Read More →
JR

Jessica Rigg

Continuing Resources Librarian, Georgia Southern University
avatar for David Schuster

David Schuster

Interim AUL for Technical Services, Systems, SC, Binghamton University
I've been in library automation for over 20 years and am always looking at ways to bring the best resources to users at the least cost. Susan Martin was a great collaborator as we started to look at how we could "manage" open access monographs in relation to collection management... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

The Odd Couple: University Libraries and Book Stores Team Up to Reduce Textbook Costs for Students
Since 2012, The University of Arizona (UA) Libraries have partnered with the UA BookStores to identify and make available eBook versions of required course materials, accessible through the campus course management system and the BookStores' website. These eBooks have multi- or unlimited use licenses and are available at no cost to students. In advance of each semester, these two stakeholder groups work in partnership to acquire, make discoverable, and promote this service to faculty and students in a variety of ways.

With the maturity of our partnership and of this service to faculty and students, the UA Libraries are investigating our current environment and working with the UA BookStores to develop a new model that will improve our workflows, processes, and service to our end users, most notably by inserting the Libraries at an earlier stage in the textbook adoption process.

This presentation will focus on both our current process and how we got to this point as well as on our future strategic plans for developing and implementing a new model in collaboration with campus stakeholders.

Our presentation will be useful to both libraries who are thinking of developing a programmatic and collaborative approach to delivering required course materials on their campuses as well as for those who already have a service in place and are looking for fresh ideas and a forum to discuss next steps. We'll present on both external considerations and internal library acquisition processes so that our audience has a full picture of workflows and collaborations.

Speakers
avatar for Teresa Hazen

Teresa Hazen

Department Head, University of Arizona
NW

Niamh Wallace

Assistant Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Worth a Thousand Words: Using Visualizations to Examine Collections Usage
This presentation will explore how the University of Wisconsin-Madison is using tools like Tableau to facilitate the manipulation of large data sets and to develop visualizations that assist in the description and analysis of collections. In this presentation we will discuss how UW has used visualizations to easily tell the story of collections usage to library and campus audiences and how UW is developing tools to assist librarians with collection management decisions. We will trace our process beginning with the assumptions library staff and campus stakeholders make about the use of collections through the formulation of concrete questions, identifying and mapping data points for answering those questions and the subsequent exploration of data sets. The presentation will describe our iterative process for developing and refining visualizations and provide an overview of data processing techniques and tools used. We will also discuss the reaction we have received from inside and outside the library as we shared the presentation of library data.

Speakers
SM

Steve Meyer

Digital Architect, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Doug Way

Doug Way

Associate University Librarian for Collections and Research Services, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Doug Way is the associate university librarian for collections and research services at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he provides leadership for the library's collection development and management, resource sharing, and scholarly communications programs. Doug has written... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Assessing the Books We Didn't Buy (The Sequel)
Three universities (Santa Clara University, the University of San Francisco, Loyola Marymount University) are leveraging patron-initiated borrowing data to inform collection development. Expanding on a pilot project, we have been looking at five years of borrowing data, along with five years of spending data and five years of circulation data of local collections, to help us define what a "normal" level of borrowing looks like as well as identify gaps in local collections. We are also using the data to strengthen the meta-collection of our consortium (LINK+) through the intentional and coordinated diversification of approval plan profiles. We will discuss both methodology and findings to date: how this data is being gathered, analyzed, and then used on our campuses to inform collection development decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Erika L. Johnson

Erika L. Johnson

Associate Dean for Technical Services, University of San Francisco
As Associate Dean for Technical Services, my areas of responsibility include oversight of the Acquisitions, Cataloging, Digital Collections, Electronic Resources, Periodicals, and Systems departments. Before joining USF in 2014 as Head of Acquisitions & Collection Management, I was... Read More →
avatar for Glenn Johnson-Grau

Glenn Johnson-Grau

Head of Acquisitions & Collection Development, Loyola Marymount University
Glenn Johnson-Grau is Head of Acquisitions & Collection Development at Loyola Marymount University. He frequently reminds himself that all is flux and nothing stays still.



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Best Practices for Building Data Collections
Is your library asked to buy data? The conversation around Research Data Management largely focuses on preserving researchers' data output, but libraries also have an important role to play earlier in the data life cycle to help researchers discover and acquire data of all kinds. Many data sets are available for purchase and the library provides a service to the organization by purchasing and making data available to support research.

In this presentation an E-acquisitions Librarian, a Data Librarian and a Social Sciences Subject Librarian will offer best practices for developing data collections in libraries, considering questions of scope, use, hosting, access, and licensing. Time and money are limited, making it important to make data collection development decisions wisely. There are different types of data that libraries can buy, including geospatial, numeric, qualitative, and social media, to name a few. Each type requires thought and planning to make available to researchers. Licensing commercially available data sets can be particularly challenging and we will share what we have learned over the years as we built our data collections and initiated a patron demand driven data program. We will also discuss the ongoing debate over who should build data collections: the subject specialist or data librarian?

Speakers
avatar for Sara Bahnmaier

Sara Bahnmaier

Acquisitions & Licensing Librarian, University of Michigan
avatar for Mara Blake

Mara Blake

Spatial and Numeric Data Librarian, University of Michigan
As a spatial and numeric data library, I work on building our library collections of geospatial data and providing better discoverability and access to the collection. I also work with researchers using numeric, qualitative, and geospatial data technologies in their research and... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Morse

Catherine Morse

Government Information, Law and Political Science Librarian, University of Michigan


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Change It Up: Growing your Career in a Wildly Different Organization
Take your professional development to the next level, curb burnout, and seize new possibilities with a move to a wildly different organization. Join us for a session on growing your career "up" or "out" by transitioning to a different size or type of organization.

The presenters have worked in academic libraries (large and small, public and private); for library vendors; and in public libraries of varying sizes. Hear their perspectives on the opportunities, surprises, and lessons learned in changing up their work environs.

Objectives:


  • Identify opportunities for professional growth that a change in organizational type, structure, and size can provide. 

  • Determine whether you, too, can spur renewed growth in your professional development/career in a wildly different type library. 

  • Better evaluate the qualifications of applicants with experience in a much different setting.


Speakers
avatar for Betsy Appleton

Betsy Appleton

Electronic and Continuing Resources Librarian, St. Edward's University
Betsy Appleton is interested in electronic resource management, scholarly communication, licensing, and collection development.
avatar for Tina Buck

Tina Buck

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Central Florida
Serials and database access with some ILS/ERM, cataloging, and acquisitions mixed in. Outside work, I like to cook and bake bread.
avatar for Carol Seiler

Carol Seiler

Account Services Manager, EBSCO Information Services



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Developing eBook Purchasing Guidelines
In 2014, Cooperating Libraries in Consortium (CLIC), a consortium of seven libraries in the Twin Cities, tasked its Collection Development Committee with starting concerted efforts to cooperatively acquire ebooks for the consortium. To that end, the group developed a philosophy and a set of purchasing and renewal review guidelines that have so far proven very helpful to fairly and fully evaluate possible purchases and make efficient purchasing decisions. The group conducted considerable research on other consortium models, as well as the myriad purchase model options available from various vendors.

Our proposed presentation would detail our efforts so that other libraries can learn from our research as well as consider using our selection and evaluation model for their own library or consortium. While we would speak to the consortium-specific aspects of ebook acquisition, we would also talk at some length about factors that are relevant for both consortia and individual libraries. Outcomes of this project included detailed checklists for acquiring new ebook packages and evaluating existing ones, which we would describe and make available to other libraries.

The four presenters would cover the goals of our project, as charged from our consortium board, challenges we faced adapting our processes from the print to the electronic realm, the many vendor models that we evaluated, and the criteria we developed to make purchasing decisions. We will also cover how we aligned our consortium members in order to purchase ebooks cooperatively, and offer advice to others on how to handle this process with colleagues at their library or consortium.

Speakers
RG

Rhonda Gilbraith

Associate Director, Bethel University Library
I am Associate Director and Collection Development Librarian at Bethel University, in St. Paul, MN. I began my library career in ILL, moving into Reference, and, eventually, Collection Management. I have served as liaison to a variety of disciplines over the years, and continue in... Read More →
avatar for Manahan, Meg

Manahan, Meg

Associate Director, Collection Management & Services, University of St. Thomas


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Effective Methods for Library Assessment
Assessment is crucial to ensure libraries meet the needs of their patrons and to show ROI on the libraries' collection investments. But what measurements are librarians taking to answer these questions and how are they collecting data? How is the data being presented and to whom? A panel of Assessment Librarians discusses the methods they use and share practical ideas for librarians tasked with measuring usage, cost-per-download, LibGuide views, web behavior, and other stats in their libraries. Learn from your colleagues about new initiatives like custom in-house databases for tracking Journals usage or a study of two years'-worth of reference transactions looking at time of day, the questions asked, and the level of questions asked based on the READ scale. Attendees will come away with actionable ideas on using statistics to show the value of the library.

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Gilmore

Tracy Gilmore

Collections Assessment Librarian, Virginia Tech
Tracy Gilmore is the Collections Assessment Librarian at Virginia Tech University Libraries. She coordinates assessment activities and strategies for developing the library’s digital collections. Her current research interests include discovery service usability, usage, and acc... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Kirk

Rachel Kirk

Professor, Assessment Librarian, Middle Tennessee State University
avatar for Elisabeth Leonard

Elisabeth Leonard

Senior Field Editor, SAGE Publications
AT

Angie Thorpe

Digital User Experience Librarian, Indiana University Kokomo


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Extreme Makeover: How We Decreased our Collection by 40% and Increased it by 50% in 10 Months
How We Decreased our Collection by 40% and Simultaneously Increased it by 50% in 10 Months!
(What?! How is that possible?!)

The Brennan Library at Lasell College had not conducted a systematic weeding in over 20 years. With space in demand, and the increase in online courses, desperate times called for drastic measures. Over a 10-month period the Library withdrew 40% of it's tangible collections. Simultaneously, the staff's focus shifted to promoting e-resources, and adopting the EBSCO EDS discovery layer. Using a weighted collection development allocation formula, the Librarians overhauled the materials budget and designed a departmental liaison program. Factoring in new e-book and streaming video collections, the Library's collection increased by 50% in spite of the massive withdrawals. This session aims to tell an encouraging story of a small academic library with limited funds and staffing that made extreme changes and saved itself from negative perceptions and imposing threats. Attendees will learn about practical ways to crunch numbers and visualize data in order to impress stakeholders. The Brennan Library added seating, zoned areas, and in-demand e-resources for a growing distance-learner population. By changing the collection development policy from "just in case" to "just in time," the Library now provides access to more items than ever before in the college's history. The endeavor involved creative thinking, and attendees may seek advice on how to strategize and make major changes in their own organizations. An access over ownership model gives small libraries the best bang for the buck and a recipe for success, provided that significant changes are communicated in a positive, exciting manner, and the Brennan Library's "makeover" proves it.

Speakers
DH

Del Hornbuckle

Director, Brennan Library, Lasell College
avatar for Lydia Sampson

Lydia Sampson

Assistant Director, Brennan Library, Lasell College
Come see my presentation "Learners Without Borders: How Electronic Resources Bridge Language and Other Divides!" Thursday, November 9, at 2:30.
AT

Amy Thurlow

Regional Manager, EBSCO Industries, Inc.
Amy Thurlow has been with EBSCO Industries Inc for over thirteen years during which she has primarily been in a sales role working directly with clients within the library to negotiate pricing, contracts, and terms for databases and software. She is familiar with working with individuals... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Improving Student Success: Arkansas State's Partnership with Credo and Regional High Schools
Are new students coming to your university ready to succeed or are they being overwhelmed by the college experience? Do faculty complain that they spend more time, with increasing frustration, providing basic research instruction to new students? Is your institution being challenged to increase 1st and 2nd year retention rates? In this "Out of the Box" session, two librarians from Arkansas State University (A-State) and Credo's Chief Content Officer will discuss their innovative collaboration in which A-State and Credo are working together to bring information literacy resources and instruction to local high schools in support of college readiness.

This session will cover a number of issues, including how the library engaged and garnered administration support, the challenge in establishing meaningful partnerships with local high schools, and developing and tracking the right metrics to validate progress. Topics of discussion will include ways in which the library can do more to enhance its strategic importance relative to administration goals; an overview of the established goals and how success will be tracked in areas including college preparedness, retention, graduation rates, GPA, and recruiting; and why this matters to the A-State Library. Participants of the session who have in place, or are trying to develop, similar programs will be encouraged to share their experiences and everyone is welcomed to provide feedback on the established goals.
Participants will gain new ideas on how to deepen faculty, administration, and community engagement while preparing students for college success, even before they arrive on a college campus.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Bailey

Jeff Bailey

Library Director, Arkansas State University
A native of Dayton, Ohio, Jeff Bailey was appointed Director of the Dean B. Ellis Library of Arkansas State University in 2012 after leading the library for three years in an interim capacity. In his academic library career, Jeff has held positions in both public and technical services... Read More →
avatar for April Sheppard

April Sheppard

Assistant Library Director, Arkansas State University
Anything and everything! From library outreach and research to heavy metal and horror movies!
avatar for Ian Singer

Ian Singer

General Manager, Credo Reference



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Making Visible Changing Scholarship in the Humanities
Scholars in the digital humanities produce work that breaks the constraints of the printed page--the monograph's traditional form--and University Presses and University Libraries are adapting their practices to meet the changing publication needs of these scholars and their research. Encouraged by the Mellon Foundation, in particular, Presses and Libraries are experimenting with various ways to meet the needs of these scholars. Anthony Watkinson, Honorary Lecturer in the Department of Information Studies at University College London will set the scene. Rebecca Welzenbach, Director of Strategic Integration and Partnerships at Michigan Publishing, will describe efforts underway at Michigan Publishing to ensure that new forms of digital scholarship are discoverable, durable, and recognizable as high-quality scholarship alongside more traditional products, focusing on initiatives including Lever Press, the Mellon-funded Fulcrum publishing platform, and the Mellon-funded Mapping the Free eBook Supply Chain research project. Susan Doerr, Assistant Director and Digital Publishing and Operations Director at the University of Minnesota Press, will turn our perspective inside a university press with a discussion of Minnesota's efforts, in collaboration with CUNY's Graduate Center Digital Scholarship Lab, to makes visible the process of a book's creation though Manifold, a Mellon-funded iterative publishing platform that seeks to transform monographs from static print forms into web-based dynamic digital publications. Our intention is to reach out to publishers and librarians in the context of considerable international interest, for example in UNESCO, in recognising the validity of non-traditional scholarly outputs. It is an area where these speakers and their institutions are at the cutting edge.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Doerr

Susan Doerr

Associate Director, University of Minnesota Press
Susan Doerr, the Associate Director at the University of Minnesota Press, is a twenty-two year publishing veteran with experience in literary, corporate, and scholarly publishing and distribution. Susan manages the Manifold Scholarship (www.manifoldapp.org) partnership with the CUNY... Read More →
avatar for Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
avatar for Rebecca Welzenbach

Rebecca Welzenbach

Director, Strategic Integration and Partnerships at Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Moving Beyond COUNTER: Assessing User Engagement with Streaming Video
Representatives from Alexander Street Press, Films on Demand, and Kanopy will discuss how their platforms capture and assess faculty and student engagement with streaming video in the classroom and beyond. Can librarians help in capturing engagement data? This librarian-moderated panel will offer an opportunity for attendees to discuss how streaming video platforms can provide enhanced assessment of users' interaction with video content in future releases.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah McCleskey

Sarah McCleskey

Head of Resource & Collection Services, Hofstra University
My units get things to people in ways that are efficient. Whether it's circulation, document delivery, resource sharing, DVDs, streaming licensing ... we deliver content to users using well-honed workflows and secret library magic. We maintain the integrity of our print collection... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Eastman-Mullins

Andrea Eastman-Mullins

VP Product Management, ProQuest / Alexander Street
avatar for Tom Humphrey

Tom Humphrey

Director of Sales & Strategy, Kanopy
avatar for Doug Mingle

Doug Mingle

Director of Online Sales, College, Infobase



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Project Management Office to the Rescue: Aligning Workforce and Resources with Library Vision and Delivering Results
Many libraries today are inundated with increasing number of tasks, projects, and initiatives through which they hope to achieve their mission and strategic vision only to find themselves losing focus and drowning in the volume of work. Hesburgh Libraries at the University of Notre Dame struggled with absorbing an exponentially growing number of projects and aligning them with institutional strategic initiatives and goals. The increasing number of projects and the relatively stable size of the workforce significantly impacted the institution's ability to complete projects in a timely fashion and within the budgetary allocation.

In October 2015, the Project Management Office (PMO) was formed. Four dedicated employees were reassigned from their previous responsibilities to manage PMO portfolios and help the Libraries lead and complete projects, as well as assist with prioritization of continuously incoming project requests. PMO's objectives include coordination of projects in the areas of IT, Technical Services and fostering of selected library strategic initiatives. Since PMO's formation, the Libraries have seen meaningful transformation in stewardship of resources and increase in accountability for delivering results.

This presentation will describe the idea behind PMO formation; our internal process for vetting and prioritizing project requests; approaches and tools we use to organize, manage, and document approved projects; and our goals for the future as PMO continues to mature and develop.

Speakers
avatar for Anastasia (Nastia)  Guimaraes

Anastasia (Nastia) Guimaraes

Project Management Librarian, University of Notre Dame
A former unit head in Technical Services, since October, 2015, Nastia has been working as a Project Management Librarian in a newly formed Project Management Office at Hesburgh Libraries, University of Notre Dame. Prior to moving into her new role, Nastia spent over a decade supervising... Read More →
avatar for Zheng (John) Wang

Zheng (John) Wang

Associate University Librarian, Digital Access, Resources, and Information Technology; Interim Director, Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship, University of Notre Dame
Zheng (John) Wang is Associate University Librarian for Digital Access, Resources, and Information Technology at the University of Notre Dame. He provides leadership and guidance and manages vision and strategies in the development and optimization of library systems and applications... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Rolling On or Getting Rolled Over? Introducing New Functional Specializations in Academic Libraries
In 2000, Wilder identified the most significant shift in the hiring practices of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) as "the growth of the job category 'functional specialist' (p. 4), defined by ARL as 'media specialists or...experts in management fields such as personnel, fiscal matters, systems, preservation, etc." (ibid.) This trend continues today. According to Sierra's (2012) review of jobs posted by ARL member libraries in 2011, two thirds of functional specialist positions were newly created or redefined.

Functional specialist librarians confront unique challenges. These positions are often "one-person shops" in which the function in question is performed by a very small staff, limiting in-house training and mentoring opportunities. Furthermore, the work of individual functional specialist positions differs significantly from specialization to specialization. While a newly-minted Cataloging Librarian would likely have the opportunity to be trained and guided by another professional librarian in their home library, a Digital Humanities specialist's work and training, for example, differs significantly from that of an Assessment Librarian. How, then, do individual functional specializations develop as sub-professions of academic librarianship?
This presentation will discuss and compare findings from large-scale surveys of librarians in two areas of specialization: Electronic Resources Management and Assessment. Attendees will learn about similarities and differences in the practices and concerns of librarians in the two groups, and how members of each group acquired the skills and knowledge required of their specializations. Attendees will be asked to share their own experiences as functional specialists to inform each other and future research efforts.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Fleming-May

Rachel Fleming-May

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences, The University of Tennessee
Rachel Fleming-May is an Associate Professor in the University of Tennessee’s School of Information Sciences. Her research and teaching interests include assessment, academic librarianship, and the intersection of creative writing and information
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Strategist, Content & Schol Comm Initiatives, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Strategist with the Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives team at LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources coorindator at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.
RM

Regina Mays

Head (Interim), Assessment Programs and Collection Strategy, University of Tennessee Libraries


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Rolling Out the Shared Print Collection: Technology, Policy, Logistics, History
Shared collections promise access to more diverse and comprehensive holdings at a more sustainable cost as well as better documentation and preservation support for the volumes in the collection. Achieving the goals of shared collections requires new approaches to the discovery, storage, bibliographic documentation, and delivery of library materials. Panelists are key voices in projects that seek to realize the potential for a more nationally unified structure for collections and the resource-sharing, preservation, and digitization services related to them. They will describe:



  • new technologies and operations management strategies that enable libraries to transform their user services and reduce the costs of collection management;

  • recent studies on the potential costs of establishing a national repository system for print materials;

  • the roles and requirements of service and archival monograph collections; and

  • how the experience of the Center for Research Libraries and the Print Archive Network (PAN) can guide the development of a nationally integrated collection.



This session brings together an impressive range of experience—from major research libraries (ReCAP) and regional partnerships (WEST), to the nation-wide HathiTrust print monograph program and the collectively built and maintained collections led by the Center for Research Libraries, to global operations and innovative business practices (Iron Mountain). Informed by the work of OCLC Research and 10 years of Print Archive Network forums, these projects seek to radically transform our collective ability to provide access to truly comprehensive research collections.

Moderators
JN

Jacob Nadal

Executive Director of the Research Collections and Preservation Consortium, Princeton University

Speakers
ES

Emily Stambaugh

UC Shared Print Manager, California Digital Library
avatar for Jeremy Suratt

Jeremy Suratt

Director Project Management Library Services, Iron Mountain
I am working Librarians and Archivists to understand their need and willingness to use Iron Mountain services to manage their collections.
MW

Marie Waltz

Head of Access Initiatives and Special Projects, Center for Research Libraries
I am newly appointed to the Head of Access Initiatives at the Center for Research Libraies. I want to learn as much as possible at this meeting about the tools and services used in other libraries. I am also involved in several of the Center for Research Libraries (CRL) print archive... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Shotgun Session: End Users/Use Statistics and Technology/Trends Threads

These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks. 

1. Usage Analysis of Print Serials: Are They Worth the Investment? (Rob Kairis)

Although part of a larger 8-campus university library system and a member of OhioLINK, a large consortium of academic libraries in Ohio, the Stark Campus Library of Kent State University maintains a modest collection of print serial subscriptions. The library has analyzed usage of both current and bound issues for many years. Cost per use analysis for each subscription suggests the overall collection is not worth the investment. The presentation will include a description of how usage of the collection is collected and measured. Participants are encouraged to share their experiences as more and more content becomes available electronically. Staffing issues (the library's Serials Librarian retired last year and was not replaced) along with political challenges will also be introduced; The Stark Campus contracts for library services with a collocated community college and manages its print serials collection. Due to the need for more classroom space on campus, print serials have been impacted more than any other library collection, making the storage of print serials an on-going problem. Alternate methods to maintaining a print serials collection, such as an online-only collection or sole reliance on on-demand document delivery, will be discussed. Based on conclusions drawn from this analysis, a comprehensive new model for continuing to subscribe to print serials will be introduced. 

2. Faculty Are Doin' It for Themselves: Librarians Show Them How (CJ Ivory)

The battle over textbook affordability continues to be waged on college campuses across the nation and in state legislatures.  Florida has even passed legislation requiring colleges and universities to reduce the costs of textbooks. University of Central Florida College of Business preemptively introduced the new Integrated Business program. This new program has nine core classes that uses a flipped classroom approach. One of the mandates of the program is to develop a curriculum with minimal additional costs to the students. The solution was to design courses without using traditional textbooks as the basis for the curriculum. I saw this as an opportunity to market library resources and promote our new role as course content curators. I worked with faculty to integrate library resources as they developed new courses. After two semesters of instruction, I surveyed the faculty to learn how satisfied they were with the available resources and how I can improve my services as content curator for their courses. During this presentation, I will share the results of the survey and provide tips on how to help faculty build courses that are rigorous as well as affordable using library resources. I will also discuss how this new role has affected my choices as a subject selector.  

3. The 5 C's Related to Rolling Out an Effective Scientific Authoring & Publishing Platform: Collaboration, Creativity, Customization, Centralization, & Compliance (Shelly Miller)

Today’s global collaborative scientific research developments offer libraries the opportunity to create a scientific authoring and publishing platform that reflects the nature and needs of the campus community. To effectively support authorship best practices and facilitate knowledge sharing, this presentation aims to inspire collaboration and offer insight regarding the challenges and opportunities encountered by libraries as they work to roll out new technologies and solutions that support, accelerate and improve the quality of research publications while minimizing the management footprint.

The Caltech Library has responded to such challenges and opportunities with an ‘Author Carpentry’ initiative that provides customized, centralized access to authoring tools and services, high quality training and user support for their researchers, students, faculty and staff. Overleaf has collaborated with The Caltech Library to develop a customized LaTeX scientific authoring portal that supports the entire campus community and is an essential component of the Caltech Author Carpentry program. This presentation will highlight the main components of an effective roll-out and current use of the innovative Overleaf-Caltech scientific authoring portal, including: easy sign-up, teaching tools, enhanced thesis templates with Caltech-approved information, featured journal templates and real-time administrative dashboard for the library to monitor data and analytics.

4. Scholars Trust Cooperative Journal Retention Update (Lars Meyer)

The Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL) launched its shared print journal program in 2010 with 15 libraries participating.  In January 2013, the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) signed an agreement to combine their print journal archives with ASERL under a single retention and access agreement called "Scholars Trust." The Florida Academic Repository (FLARE), a statewide shared collection, is also now participating in the program.  A total of 38 libraries are contributing content to Scholars Trust for a combined collection of circa 20,000 unique ISSNs representing over 300,000 volumes.  The participating libraries and consortia are collaborating to maintain legacy print collections into the future, allowing for the possibility of deduplicating local collections.  I will provide an overview of governance and participation; benefits to libraries, including a priority reciprocal ILL program; libraries' use of the Journal Retention and Needs Listing (JRNL) database and Local Holdings Records to share information, especially for identifying gaps; and how Scholars Trust relates to similar print preservation efforts in North America, such as the CIC Shared Print Repository and the Western Regional Storage Trust.  I will conclude with some thoughts about why libraries should consider participating in consortial print preservation efforts. 

Moderators
avatar for David Myers

David Myers

Representative - N.A Sales, Bentham Science Publishers
David Myers, President and CEO of DMedia Associates, Inc., is an Information Industry expert, with over 27 years experience specializing in Strategy, Sales, Licensing and Business Development. Throughout his career, he has drafted, negotiated and closed over 500 domestic and international... Read More →

Speakers
CI

CJ Ivory

Business Librarian, University of Central Florida
avatar for Rob Kairis

Rob Kairis

Library Director, Kent State University, Stark Campus
My interests include: Cooperative Collection Development, Library Approval Plans, Plagiarism, Academic Honesty, Information Literacy.
LM

Lars Meyer

Director, Access & Resource Services, Emory University
avatar for Shelly Miller

Shelly Miller

Sales & Academic Outreach Manager, Overleaf
Collaborative scientific research, authoring and publishing



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Stay Calm and Cover Your ASSessment: Creating a Culture of Assessment on a Shoestring
One of the academic initiatives of our time is student success; therefore, a library mission that contributes to the academic success of students is a necessity. While academic libraries routinely engage in assessment for a variety of reasons such as improving processes, responding to customer needs, and reporting accreditation requirements, many academic libraries are being required to prove the value of the library to the institution by contributing to the academic success of its students.
Assessment is no longer a choice for libraries, it has become an expectation. Although most libraries are already doing some assessment, there is little effort to build a culture of assessment where staff understand and fully engage in the process. In many organizations, assessment is often initiated and driven by library administration. Despite good intentions, many initiatives ultimately fail due to lack of staff buy-in.
How can assessment become a library-wide initiative in which everyone participates with shared, common goals? What strategies can be used to promote a culture of assessment?
By the end of this session attendees will be able to formulate ideas of how to develop a library-wide culture of assessment and create a toolkit that supports the development of essential skill sets required to support this initiative. Poll Everywhere, Q & A, and discussion will engage attendees.

Speakers
avatar for Audrey Powers

Audrey Powers

Associate Librarian, University of South Florida
I am an Associate Librarian at the University of South Florida. Currently, I work with students and faculty in The College of The Arts, but in my former life I was a Science librarian. These very different roles have provided me with the unique opportunity to work with researchers... Read More →
avatar for Susan Silver

Susan Silver

Associate Librarian, Social Sciences Librarian, University of South Florida
I am the social sciences librarian at the University of South Florida Tampa Library. I teaches information literacy skills to undergraduate and graduate students and develop and maintain collections for several areas within the social sciences. My research focuses primarily on the... Read More →
avatar for Matt Torrence

Matt Torrence

Associate Librarian, STEM Librarian, University of South Florida
I currently serve as the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics) Librarian at the University of South Florida, Tampa Library. Along with the rest of the library professionals and subject specialists, I provide information expertise to students and faculty, with a special... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Technological, Organizational, and Cultural Transformation of Technical Services and Collection Development
West Virginia University Libraries migrated to a new ILS and reorganized technical services during FY 2015-16. These technological and organizational changes transformed technical service operations, especially ordering receiving workflows, which led to cultural changes throughout technical services and in collection development activities.

In addition to the myriad incremental changes that normal tech service operations face, WVU experienced the technological and organizational transformation that arose out of moving to a next gen ILS in a networked community system, resulting in the merging of copy cataloging activities with acquisitions. This had a significant impact on print ordering and receiving operations. Additionally, loading of MARC records for electronic resources was replaced by simply maintaining the new knowledge base, which is fully integrated with the new discovery system.

Following on the heels of these changes, cultural changes have filtered throughout the unit and collaborations with subject liaisons. The new organizational structure, reporting lines and duties in a new system have led to more participation, collaboration, and accountability within technical services. External to the unit, collection development has shifted to allocations by college and subject, allowing librarians to have larger input to resources in their areas.

The objectives of this session are to increase attendees' understanding of: 


  1. the difference between incremental and transformational change 

  2. the various drivers for transformational change, and 

  3. how to prepare for, continue through, and move past large changes that affect technology, organization, and culture. 


Audience will participate in polls in order to compare with other organizations.

Speakers
JW

Janetta Waterhouse

Director, Knowledge Access & Resource Management, West Virginia Unversity


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

The Future of Discovery - Hyperknowledge
The volume of data and different formats (text, video, images) today is overwhelming, and traditional search, while brilliant for 'known item searching', does not perform well around 'conceptual search'
In this presentation we will explain how next generation technology can help deal with fragmented information in multiple formats and to help make sense of this for researchers, and more importantly, how it can help people find connections that they didn't even know to look for
The audience will be invited to review some real case studies across different areas of how the new technology (hyperknowledge) has helped drive research forward in various domains and also how it's driving up standards in teaching environments
The audience will learn about the potential of this groundbreaking new technology which changes how research is conducted, and how research communities and individuals can engage and work together.

Speakers
RG

Ruggero Gramatica

CEO, Yewno Inc
MA

Michael A. Keller

Vice Provost and University Librarian, Stanford University
Vice Provost, University Librarian, Publisher Stanford University


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

The Librarian's Survival Guide to the 'Big Deal': Tools for Unbundling
In 2016, the Canadian loonie fell to 77% of the U.S. dollar, creating unexpected financial challenges for collections management. Examining usage statistics was the clear first place to start when evaluating resources for cancellation - but would data-driven decisions based purely on cost per use be adequate?

In this joint presentation by Western University and EBSCO Information Services, we will look beyond cost per use, and focus on how Western built on the "big deal" analysis work initiated by the University de Montreal, adding a journal overlap analysis and home-grown method of performing citation analysis using Web of Science and Scopus to determine where university researchers and their collaborators are publishing. Early results from selected publisher packages show that Western is able to save nearly half the "big deal" sticker price with minimal impact to researchers and students.

We will also discuss our collaborative work with other Canadian universities through the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) and the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN). EBSCO Information Services will demonstrate how they helped inform this process by providing title cost and usage data.

The interactive session will involve the audience through discussions about their own collection assessment challenges and triumphs. Attendees will leave with new ideas, questions to consider, and practical tools to help experiment with unbundling their own "big deals."

This session was co-authored by Alie Visser, Research & Instructional Services Librarian, Western University, who was unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Cassady

Samuel Cassady

Head, Collections and Content Strategies, Western University
DL

Doug Lynch

VP Sales, Subscription Services/YBP, EBSCO Information Services
avatar for Leanne Olson

Leanne Olson

Metadata Management Librarian, Western University
Leanne Olson is currently a Metadata Management Librarian at Western University, and will become Western's new the Digitization and Digital Preservation Librarian in May 2018. She has worked at Western Libraries since 2008 and regularly seeks out opportunities to teach, despite her... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

The Road Ahead? Patron-Driven Acquisition Might Become...
Library patrons make use of many forms of content: journals, ebooks, videos, audio tracks, archival documents, musical scores, etc. Each of these content types is amenable to PDA and the technology certainly exists to deliver each of these content types in PDA. So what stands in the way? We consider the prospects for a future-state of PDA that is multimedia, universal in its publisher/provider inclusion and delivered in an "e-commerce," if you will, environment where the content providers and the library can engage in negotiated agreement on item subscription charges and the trigger to purchase, rather than these being set by the aggregator.

In this panel we will explore three trends propelling us toward this future state and three trends hindering this future state, and will solicit feedback from participants as to other trends we may have missed.

Propelling:
1. Continually tightening library budgets
2. Gradual emergence of affordable, patron-driven models like ReadCube
3. Decreasing demonstrable value of "commodity collections," especially in print and especially in research libraries, moving us towards digitization of rare and unique collections for consumption on demand

Hindering:
1. The emergence of a standard for a platform
2. Flexible terms on triggers and prices
3. Strong cultur of "institutional ownership" and collection building in libraries

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Assoc. Dean for Collections & Schol Comm, University of Utah
avatar for David Parker

David Parker

VP, Editorial & Licensing, Alexander Street a ProQuest Company
David Parker is VP Editorial and Licensing for Alexander Street – the leading provider of video, multi-media databases and unique, curated content to the global university library market. Prior to his role with Alexander Street, David founded Business Expert Press and served as... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

We're on a Roll: Transforming E-Book Acquisitions in a Shifting Budget Landscape
In response to the challenging budget landscape in 2015/16, the University of British Columbia Library took a new approach to e-book acquisitions. The Associate University Librarian, Collections, established a working group with a mandate to develop and implement a strategy for library-wide e-book purchasing. Members of the group were drawn from both campuses and represented public and technical services and a broad spectrum of disciplines.

In this presentation, we will briefly review the factors that led to the formation of the working group, then discuss the steps taken in the analysis, selection, and purchase of e-books. The committee's two-pronged approach - the purchase of large ebook packages and participation in evidence-based acquisitions programs with Cambridge, Wiley, Taylor & Francis, and CRC Press - will be explored in depth.

We will highlight the benefits of cross-unit collaboration, the vendor and publisher relations, and the effective use of limited funds. We will discuss the many challenges around discovery and access, evaluation and decision-making, and transitioning the program into the current fiscal year.

We expect that our presentation will contribute to the broader picture of how large academic libraries can address rising costs, limited budgets, and the variety of publisher e-book offers.

Speakers
avatar for Sheldon Armstrong

Sheldon Armstrong

Interim AUL Collections, University of British Columbia
I am currently the Interim AUL Collection at the UBC Library located on the Vancouver campus. I have many years of experience in licensing, budgeting and publisher negotiations - but am most interested in where we should be heading in the long term. I am eagerly waiting our industry's... Read More →
avatar for Arielle Lomness

Arielle Lomness

Collections Librarian, University of British Columbia - Okanagan Campus
Arielle Lomness is the Collections Librarian at UBC Library’s Okanagan campus, in addition to serving as a subject librarian. She is currently responsible for coordinating the Library’s collections activities, including the acquisitions of new content, the maintenance of the existing... Read More →
avatar for Sally Taylor

Sally Taylor

Science Librarian, University of British Columbia
Sally Taylor is a science librarian on the UBC Vancouver campus, supporting researchers in the biological sciences, fisheries, forestry and the environmental sciences. She has been peripherally involved in RDM activities since 2014 and has been seconded as Research Data Services Librarian... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Why We Blog - Reshaping Research, Captivating Tales from Academic Bloggers
Hear firsthand from ACI Scholarly Blog Index authors, leading academics in their field, on why they blog and the value and importance blogging plays in their academic role and scholarly communication. Blogging and microblogging enable new forms of interaction between authors and their readers. The next generation of college students are Internet savvy, but not all are information literate. How do faculty and librarians bridge students' information gaps and teach them information skills, beyond tweeting and texting, to think critically and be successful? Scholarly blogs are part of the solution and an aid to reshaping approaches to research. Panelists share background stories and insights on academic blogging.

Moderators
avatar for Pat Sabosik

Pat Sabosik

General Manager, ACI Scholarly Blog Index, ACI Information Group
Blogs, blogs, blogs! As the General Manager of the ACI Scholarly Blog Index I talk with faculty bloggers and librarians every day about the increasing importance of scholarly blogs in the chain of scholarly communication and as a discovery service for new research, scholarship, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Chief Strategist for Research Collaboration, Libraries, North Carolina State University
avatar for Thomas Nadelhoffer

Thomas Nadelhoffer

Associate Professor of Philosophy, College of Charleston
WW

W. William Woolsey

Associate Professor of Economics, The Citadel



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Friday, November 4
 

11:35am EDT

A Model for Patron Driven Acquisition of Print Music Scores: From Conception to Reality
This presentation will explore the process of developing a unique Patron Driven Acquisition Program for PRINT music scores and monographs from concept to reality at an American Association of Research Libraries institution. Areas to be discussed include collection development considerations, information technology infrastructure needs, acquisitions workflows, and plan evaluation. The presentation will examine how partnering with a vendor to implement an innovative collection development plan can support the needs of the library users and the goals of library collection development officers and increase access to music scores and monographs in a fiscally responsible way. Presentation attendees can expect to learn about the opportunities and challenges that the library and vendor faced in implementing the plan, outcomes and evaluation, and steps for the future.

Speakers
avatar for Alan  Asher

Alan Asher

Music Librarian, University of Florida



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

A Running Start: A Crowd-Sourced Database of Due Diligence to Invoke Section 108
Starting in the late 1970s academic libraries built collections of VHS titles with an emphasis on supporting classroom teaching. On average academic libraries have more than 3000 VHS tapes.

Eclipsed by robust and rapid adoption of DVDs, the VHS era is now over. But a crisis is welling for libraries. Of the hundreds of thousands of VHS recordings commercially released, a substantial number never were released on DVD or in streaming format. To compound matters, industry experts estimate that various forces converge against VHS (age of tapes, irreparable and irreplaceable equipment, retirement of VHS technicians) ultimately making the format inaccessible by 2027.

Under Section 108 of US Copyright law libraries have an available remedy to this problem. The law allows duplication of content that is lost, damaged, stolen, deteriorating, or in an obsolete format. A library, however, cannot simply begin digitizing all their VHS tapes. Section 108 requires that, prior to duplication, a reasonable search be conducted to determine that an unused copy of the title is not available at a fair price, and evidence of that search should be kept.

This session presents a cooperative database, established to capture the search efforts for current distribution of VHS video titles, and to identify titles eligible for duplication under Section 108.

The crowd-sourced database is available now for others to jump start their own preservation efforts but others are invited to contribute. The metadata available through the database can serve as a foundation for coordinated digitization efforts.

Speakers
avatar for deg farrelly

deg farrelly

Media Librarian, Arizona State University Libraries
With 40 years experience as a media librarian deg farrelly provides a unique perspective on video in academic libraries. He is the author of “Streaming Video” in the book Rethinking Collection Development and Management, (published by ABC-Clio) and co-investigator in the 2013... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

A Tale of Two Serials Cancellations
Beginning in 2016, both WWU and GWU found that they needed to make significant and similar reductions in continuations costs over the next five years. In response, this past year, both institutions took independent, significant steps toward these ends, developing systematic, sustainable procedures for addressing these reductions. The approaches taken by the two institutions will be compared and contrasted in this presentation, particularly with respect to the following questions, which both libraries encountered:
• What defines a ‘successful’ cancellation process in 2016?
• What are the most effective approaches to cancelling serials?
• When do cancellations do 'least harm' to students and faculty? After cancellations, how is access to content affected to the smallest degree possible?
• Did the cancellation process have the appearance of fairness to stakeholders? How does a library foster university buy-in?
• What do successful negotiations with publishers look like?

Members of the team will discuss:
• criteria for possible retention or cancellation
• different assessment methods utilized
• communication with subject liaisons and disciplinary teams
• outreach to and response from faculty
The panel will also address lessons learned from their efforts, as well as future plans in a continuing flat budget scenario.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Bezanson

Deborah Bezanson

Senior Research Librarian, George Washington University
DK

David Killian

Collection Development and Reference Librarian, George Washington University
RK

Robin Kinder

Reference and Collection Development Librarian, George Washington University
MO

Mike Olson

Director of Scholarly Resources & Collection Services, Western Washington University Libraries


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Big Data 2.0: Critical Roles for Libraries and Librarians
Big Data is a live issue in e-commerce and market intelligence, e-government and politics, national security, and smart healthcare; a key feature of digital scholarship and open science; and an emergent concern for education and the cultural heritage sectors. Big Data 2.0 raises the stakes: the convergence of e-science with business intelligence, crowdsourcing, data analytics, social media, and Web2.0 technologies allows broader and deeper applications, involving cooperative processing of structured and unstructured data. Hype around the "data talent gap" highlights a shortage of candidates for data science jobs with the requisite computational and analytical skills, but informed observers point to an equally critical need for competence in digital curation to ensure proper stewardship of data, best done by institutions with preservation know-how. Libraries already provide data literacy education, research data services, data mining support, and open linked data, but should now engage with the Big Data initiatives launched in the US and globally as collaborative, interdisciplinary, cross-sector endeavors predicated on large-scale community participation. The session will explain how data-intensive research is moving to new levels of technical and organizational complexity, promising advances in human knowledge for the benefit of society, but raising critical issues for institutions and individuals relevant to information professionals. It will describe salient characteristics of Big Data megaprojects and explore opportunities for library involvement. Participants will be invited to share experiences of Big Data and consider potential responses to the challenges presented. They will gain fuller understanding of large-scale big data projects and their implications for libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Sheila Corrall

Sheila Corrall

Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Information Culture & Data Stewardship
Sheila Corrall worked in UK public, special, and national libraries in acquisitions, cataloging, reference and information services, before moving into higher education, where she served as university librarian at two institutions and as CIO at a large research university. In 2004... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Book Usage is Rollin' Down: Multifaceted Assessment of Monograph Collection Performance to Optimize Purchase Decisions
Georgia State University's print circulation has declined over 50% since 2010. Collection development librarians made several small-scale adjustments to address this trend, yet the drop off in use continued unabated. We had to totally rethink the book budget. In order to make changes strategically and responsibly, we needed answers to a variety of questions: Who is using the books? Are there disciplines that do not need firm order allocations, or even monographs? Does format matter? Does it matter how the titles are acquired (approval vs. firm order vs. DDA)?

This session will discuss the multifaceted data-driven analysis we developed in order to provide a detailed and holistic picture of monograph collection performance and buying patterns. For example, we analyzed use of the monograph collection broken down by spending categories, format, and LC class, but also compared usage of the entire collection to the performance of the recently acquired titles. A more qualitative component of the project involved recording the decisions underlying the subject librarians' FY16 purchases. We will share how we developed our analysis, what our data has revealed, surprises within the project, and the action items generated by our activities. We hope to generate a discussion among audience members about how others have approached and addressed the problem of declining print circulation.

Speakers
TC

Tricia Clayton

Collection Assessment & Discovery Librarian, Georgia State University
Tricia Clayton is the Collection Assessment Librarian at Georgia State University located in downtown Atlanta. As a member of the Collection Development department, her primary responsibilities include collection assessment, wrangling and interpreting usage statistics, and overseeing... Read More →
avatar for Skye Hardesty

Skye Hardesty

Head, Collection Development & Discovery, Georgia State University



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Collection Development Environmental Scan: A Strategy for Informed Decision Making
The researchers conducted an environmental scan of thirteen of Washington State University Libraries' peer institutions. The set of chosen libraries were similar to WSU in size and scope (e.g., a similar land-grant mission, or a veterinary school without a law school or a medical school). The libraries surveyed were drawn from members of the Association of American Universities (AAU), the Washington State Legislative Peer Set, and WSU's Global Challenge State Peers.

Surveys and follow-up interviews covered a broad range of collection development issues including details about administration, policies and procedures, the place of Interlibrary Loans in collection development, Big Deals, open access, textbooks, and open educational resources. Questions regarding collection funding sources, fees, and storage facilities were also covered.

This session will report on the surveys and interviews collected and show how they can inform collection managers' decision-making and collections strategy during a period of rapid change and tight budget times by providing details about how other academic libraries are handling assessments, Big Deal conversations, and journal cancellations.

Speakers
JC

Joel Cummings

Head of Collection Development, Washington State University Libraries
Joel Cummings has worked at Washington State University since 1999, first as an electronic resources librarian, then collection manager for the sciences and now Head of Collection Development. Previous positions include reference and instruction librarian at University College of... Read More →
LC

Lara Cummings

Agriculture and Instruction Librarian, Washington State University Libraries
CZ

Christy Zlatos

Liaison Librarian, Washington State University Libraries


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Current Collection Development Strategies for Video
Collecting video content today poses challenges for the academic library. Diverse missions lead to very different collection development needs across academic libraries. Large research institutions may desire to collect for perpetuity, while smaller collections are often more curriculum-focused. Video collection strategies vary based on mission, budget, technological infrastructure, and other factors. Acquiring video content is complicated by the variety of formats and licensing options the academic librarian must take into consideration. In this panel, academic librarians who collect video content will discuss collecting to support research now and in the future, collecting to support curricular needs, and collaboration between institutions for cooperative collection decisions. We will discuss our strategies for maximizing budgets and address the philosophy of access versus ownership. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and provide additional ideas for ways that librarians can enhance and improve video acquisition.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah McCleskey

Sarah McCleskey

Head of Resource & Collection Services, Hofstra University
My units get things to people in ways that are efficient. Whether it's circulation, document delivery, resource sharing, DVDs, streaming licensing ... we deliver content to users using well-honed workflows and secret library magic. We maintain the integrity of our print collection... Read More →
avatar for Winifred Metz

Winifred Metz

Head, Media Center, University Libraries, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
As Head of the Media Center, my work is focused on both the analysis and production of Media and I lead a team of 5 professionals specializing in media design, digital literacy, media production, public service, access & description, use metrics & analytics, and resource management... Read More →
avatar for Danette  Pachtner

Danette Pachtner

Librarian for Film, Video & Digital Media, Duke University Libraries
Danette is the subject librarian for Film, Video & Digital Media and Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University's Lilly Library. A San Francisco native, she received her undergraduate degree at Wesleyan University and her MLIS at UCLA.


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Digital Research Practices: The Real User Experience: A Collaborative Library/Publisher Initiative
The last decade has seen rapid growth in the amount of information available online. For the academic community, this explosion of content has significantly changed the way students and researchers alike find and use information. Having access to digital information - and understanding how best to use that information - is particularly crucial to postgraduate students starting new research projects.

In order to better understand how students use information in their research, Loughborough University and Taylor & Francis Group undertook a joint project to capture the PhD research student's User Experience (UX). Over the course of 12 months, 10 research students from Loughborough University kept diaries and attended focus groups where their views, experiences, and approaches to using information were captured. Their experience with scholarly communication was a significant focus of these activities, along with evaluating different publisher platforms and reflecting on how Open Access and social media channels could be used to meet their research needs.

During this session, Graham Walton, Assistant Director for Academic and User Services at Loughborough University Library, and Stacy Stanislaw, Library Communications Manager at Taylor & Francis Group, will provide an overview of this collaborative project, discussing the idea that academic libraries and publishers can help improve the researcher experience in discovering and navigating online content. The session will also look at the process behind and results of this project, along with lessons learned and insights gathered into the real User eXperience. Finally, the presentation will include time for questions and feedback from the audience on the project.

Speakers
avatar for Stacy Stanislaw

Stacy Stanislaw

Library Communications Manager, The Americas, Taylor & Francis Group
I am the Library Communications Manager at Taylor & Francis Group and am responsible for managing the library marketing and communications activities for North and South America. I first joined Taylor & Francis in 2008 as the manager of the library and information science journals... Read More →
avatar for Graham Walton

Graham Walton

Honorary Research Fellow, Loughborough University
I have worked in libraries since 1971 and enjoyed every (well, nearly) every minute. Research and/or evaluation and/or impact assessment has always been an interest. A continual driver over the past 30 years has been to capture people's changing information seeking behaviours and... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

From DDA to EBA: A Five-year Story from a Consortium Shared E-Book Collection Program
Maintaining an e-book program at a consortium level is complex. Considerations include ensuring a broad range of useful content is available, stable costs, and minimizing barriers to access for patrons.

This session will look at Orbis Cascade Alliance's experience and evolution across the last five years in testing and assessing different e-book models. The presenters will provide their perspective on how the Alliance is influenced by and influences the e-book ecosystem at large. They will share lessons and reflect upon their successfully run Demand Driven Acquisition approach, and share why they decided to pilot an Evidenced Based Acquisition approach with Wiley.

Attendees can expect to learn how this consortium continues to evolve their approaches with the ever-changing e-book collection acquisition world.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina DeShazo

Kristina DeShazo

Director of Collection Management, Oregon Health & Science University
I recently moved into my new role as Collection Development & Assessment Librarian at OHSU. I oversee the collection using review, analysis, and assessment to ensure that the library provides resources to meet the needs of the OHSU community.
avatar for Kathi Fountain

Kathi Fountain

Consortia Account Manager, Oxford University Press
avatar for Jim Huenniger

Jim Huenniger

Senior Account Manager, Wiley
I have the pleasure to work with SCELC and all member libraries. I oversee the licensing of Wiley Online Library products including Journals and Journal archives, Major Reference Works, Books, Current Protocols, The Cochrane Library and more.



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

From the Concept to Results: A Case Study on the Collection Development for the ODC - Opening Day Collection at Qatar National Library
"A library collection should fit the mission for which it is created. The number of books it holds does not determine its worth." (E. J. Loveland, 2000)

If so, how do we create a National Library and how do we build its collection from scratch? Since 2012, when the plans for the new national library were announced, Qatar National Library (QNL) envisioned as carrying out its mission to: "spread knowledge, nurture imagination, cultivate creativity, and preserve the nation's heritage for future generations."

This presentation will focus on the 3 years' experience of selection, acquisition, and processing of library materials, in a perspective of achieving the Opening Day Collection. We would like to share a preliminary outcome of building a library collection in Arabic, English, and other languages in record time; facing challenges in negotiations (long-term vendors and single sources), logistics (building a library collection without a building), and business culture (visions, working style in a Middle East Business culture/context). We will discuss our various acquisition methods (i.e., blanket and firm orders, donations, gifts and exchanges, Spot purchases from Book Fairs, personal contacts, etc.), highlighting both the challenges and the rewards. General statistics and timelines will be provided to elucidate the intended target and achievements to date. The systems used to support this mission are also highlighted with details enough but not to compromise aspects necessary for future significant milestone reports of QNL. It is expected that the QNL acquisitions program will more than meet its intended targets for the ODC.

Attendees should come away with an understanding of the issues and processes related to the acquisitions of international materials. In addition, we hope to generate a discussion with the audience about alternative experiences and processes in creating a library collection from the scratch.

Speakers
avatar for Katarzyna Dudek

Katarzyna Dudek

Acquisitions Librarian, Qatar National Library
Katarzyna is the Acquisitions Librarian at Qatar National Library located in the Education City, Doha, Qatar. As a member of the Technical Services and Acquisition department, her primary responsibilities include collection assessment, ordering and processing all types of library... Read More →
avatar for Henry Owino

Henry Owino

Information Resources Manager, University of New England



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Moving Altmetrics Mainstream: How to Bring Recommended Practice into Reality
The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has published final recommendations regarding alternative metrics that have been developed over the past two years. Publishing these recommendations is only the beginning of the process. To be truly successful, these recommendations need to be adopted into practice. During this talk, Todd will discuss those definitions, the recommendations, and the new altmetrics data quality code of conduct. These publications serve as a point to push forward adoption and next steps to further advance acceptance of new forms of metrics and assessment of new forms of communicating information. Finally, consideration will be given in areas of work that the community still has before us, and audience input will be solicited to create further discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, NISO
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Executive Director, NISO - National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Executive Director at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Rolling in the Deep: Negotiating to Have It All
We *all* negotiate! Negotiating is happening all around you. You do it every day. This panel of negotiation experts come from libraries of all different sizes and places. Each will reflect on how learning and understanding negotiation skills from the online course "Negotiation Skills for Librarians" taught by Sarah Durrant has made us each a better librarian. Each expert will give real-life examples of applying learned negotiating skills to their day-to-day work, including publisher and vendor negotiations. Topics will illustrate strategies from the course, such as publisher profiling, understanding the four cornerstones of negotiation, putting principles of negotiation into practice, and looking at ways to evaluate success. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions. Attendees will leave with a much better understanding of what it takes to negotiate in all aspects of work life, and how to remain resilient through it all.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Alayan

Kristina Alayan

Head of Reference & Adjunct Professor of Law, Georgetown Law Library
JC

Jennifer Carroll

Collection Management Librarian, University of New Hampshire
avatar for Aaron Lupton

Aaron Lupton

Electronic Resources Librarian, York University
I have been the Electronic Resources Librarian at York University in Toronto since 2009. I am involved in negotiating licenses and purchases of all electronic materials in York's collections. I also have an interest in all matters pertaining to assessment, especially collections assessment... Read More →
avatar for Ronda Rowe

Ronda Rowe

UT System Licensing and Communications Librarian, University of Texas at Austin
Ronda Rowe is the UT System Licensing and Communications Librarian for the University of Texas Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. In this position, she is responsible for developing and implementing effective and efficient license negotiations and processing for the... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Shotgun Sessions: Collection Development Analysis & Assessment and Discovery of Collections Threads
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1. Retention Modeling for the Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust (EAST) (Anna Perrici)

How do you get 40 diverse libraries to agree on a model for shared print retention in 8 weeks? This lively overview will demonstrate the process of forming and refining such a model for retention of monographs, using collection analysis and visualization software. The Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust (EAST) is a partnership of 48 academic libraries, 40 of which are committing to retain titles on behalf of all EAST members for a minimum of 15 years.  EAST seeks to maintain access to the scholarly record through sustained cooperation between partner libraries.  

Hear how the project team worked with partner libraries, the vendor for collection analysis software (Sustainable Collection Services), working group members and EAST governance to refine and adopt a model for retaining over 6 million scholarly monographs. The key elements of the final model will be covered as well major lessons learned.

When this proposal was written the collection analysis project had just transitioned to the retention allocation and commitment phase.  More details and specifics on lessons learned will be available by the time this shotgun sessions occurs.

2. The Past is Prologue:   What 50 Years of History can tell us about the Future of Collection Development (David Sharp) 

This shotgun session will handpick a collection of eighteen of the most informative, peculiar, and self-evident insights that I learned during my sabbatical leave.  I reviewed five decades worth of collection development history, data and practice at Carleton University Library (Ottawa, Canada).  In the process,  I discovered things about both the distant and recent past that might help prepare us for some of the challenges of the future.     

Topics of discussion will include inflation, exchange rates, staffing, the perception and reality of tough economic times, why you should care about furniture budget, austerity versus fiscal stimulus, the unabated growth of e-resources, transparency and assessment, user-centered collection development models, audits, and more.  

The presentation will combine easy-to-interpret visuals with clear talking points to covey its information.  It will be of interest to library staff, who can generalize from Carleton's history and can import the lessons to be had to their own institutions; and of interest to vendors and publishers, who can take in a six minute "long view" of a university library and the challenges it has and will continue to face.
 
3. Validation Sample Study for Shared Print Collection - Is It There? (Gwen Verkuilen-Chevalier)

The Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust Shared Print project conducted a Validation Study in the spring of 2016 to determine an "availability metric" and average condition of circulating print materials in the 40 retention partner libraries.  This talk will cover the methodology and results of this validation study, how it played into the retention model being used by EAST, and touch on how Google App Scripts was used to create a front end to Google Sheets for a live data collection tool and administrative dashboard. 

4. Know Your Collections! : Rebuilding a Discovery Service and an Open URL Resolver (Judith Nagata) 

Building and maintaining a library collection is only valuable if the students, faculty, and staff can find and use those resources. Therefore, maintenance of discovery services is an integral part of the daily workflow of acquisitions, collection maintenance, and assessment. Access to collections is lost when either collection or discovery services management falters.  This session will demonstrate how a medium-sized academic library with limited library staff rebuilt both their discovery service and their open url resolver. Discussion will include the importance of both selecting appropriate search and retrieval metadata as well as including the correct collections (at a title level) for full text access. It also will provide information on the decision making process that made the project manageable and possible to complete in seven months. 

5. Everything I want to say about Open Access in 6 minutes 40 seconds (John Dove) 

In June of last year I jumped head-long into the world of Open Access. I've watched from the sidelines these past several decades. I come from a family with three generations of academics across STEM, Social Sciences and Humanities. I have real passion for seeing the results of scholarship be freely available to all of society without limitations. In 6 minutes and 40 seconds I'm going to share with you what I've learned about the current state of Open Access and what I think the path forward is to accomplishing some of the benefits of open access in my lifetime.

Moderators
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director, Global Sales, AIP Publishing

Speakers
avatar for John G Dove

John G Dove

Consultant, Paloma & Associates
I'm best known for the role I had in building Credo Reference into a well-respected online reference tool for libraries that is deeply linked into the resources of its host library--thereby serving one of the important features of an online encyclopedia. Since leaving Credo at... Read More →
avatar for Judith Nagata

Judith Nagata

Electronic Resources Librarian, Coastal Carolina University
I am managing all of the electronic resources (ebooks, ejournals, databases, streaming media) for Coastal Carolina University. I also manage the access points via discovery services, the library website and the catalog. I am interested in learning more about ways to manage collections... Read More →
avatar for Anna Perricci

Anna Perricci

Project Manager, Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust / Boston Library Consortium
avatar for David Sharp

David Sharp

Head, Acquisitions, Carleton University Library
GV

Gwen Verkuilen-Chevalier

Head of Collection Development and User Services, Saint Anselm College



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Social Scholarship?: Academic Communications in the Digital Age
Scholars and scientists today are urged to build online identities, to promote their work on social media, and to track its impact via altmetrics. So too is academic writing seen as a social location, or a place for interaction on work at its different stages (as in "versioning," or the public composition of an article or book). Indeed, new projects for the design of innovative digital publishing formats, including those sponsored by the Mellon Foundation, are promoting such a social, collaborative, or participatory approach to complement the introduction of multi-media into scholarly monographs. But not all scholars and scientists, however much they welcome open access publishing and opportunities for networking, are enthusiastic about social scholarship. Some favor the durability of traditional academic habits and others note the limits of interest, particularly in science, for online conversation about research across many platforms. And there is anxiety too about the role of social media in faculty evaluation. This session will offer first an account of competing positions on social scholarship, aimed at helping participants see different views of our digital situation and future. Participants will then be invited to consider the extent to which scholarship can be fruitfully social, and the meanings of social scholarship for academic libraries, in these and other activities: designing and managing institutional repositories, guiding the faculty in the uses of bibliographic management software and altmetrics, evaluating emerging e-publishing initiatives featuring their social dimensions, and exploring prospects for library publishing itself.


Speakers
SW

Steve Weiland

Professor of Higher Education, Michigan State University


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

The Sky's the Limit: Scholarly Communication, Digital Initiatives, Institutional Repositories, and Subject Librarians
The University of Central Florida's institutional repository, STARS (Showcase of Text, Archives, Research & Scholarship), has presented new opportunities for collaboration amongst the Libraries' Office of Scholarly Communication, Digital Initiatives, Research Services, and Subject Librarians. Building on efforts to proactively promote scholarly communication initiatives to the university community, these four units have used the institutional repository as a foundation for collaboration, outreach, marketing and educational efforts. This presentation will give an overview of STARS and highlight the role the IR has in increasing the collaborative efforts of these four units.

A four person panel representing four different perspectives will discuss strategies designed to generate IR interest and content from the university community. Successful ventures and lessons learned will provide insight into creating a productive inter-departmental framework that is geared towards supporting student and faculty IR projects. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and share ideas from their own IR perspectives. After participating in this program, attendees will be able to develop winning IR collaboration strategies for their own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Lee Dotson

Lee Dotson

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Central Florida
Lee Dotson is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries. She has been the manager of STARS, UCF’s digital institutional repository, since it went live in the summer of 2015 and has had the opportunity to work with digital projects and repositories... Read More →
avatar for Richard H. Harrison II

Richard H. Harrison II

Associate University Librarian, University of Central Florida
Richard Harrison has been an Associate University Librarian in the Research and Information Services department of the UCF Libraries since April 2001. During the 2003-2004 academic year, he served as a Senior Faculty Fellow in the UCF Provost’s office, working with the then Vice... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Norris

Sarah Norris

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Central Florida
Sarah Norris is Scholarly Communication Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries. In this role, she leads the Libraries’ Scholarly Communication and open access efforts, with an emphasis on scholarly publishing and copyright. She has presented at local, state, national... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head of Research & Information Services, University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). Barbara was an Invited... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am EDT

Tower of Babel: New Realities in Foreign Language Acquisitions
Sourcing information and material from overseas can be a daunting and complex task, with real challenges posed by diverse and fragmented publishing markets and distribution realities as well as the need for foreign language skills. This panel session explores how specialist vendors' expertise and understanding of specific markets can assist librarians in their search for relevant material. Three vendors operating in three very distinct geographic areas will share their experience{s} and discuss how the unique {and fascinating} nature of their activity provides valuable support for successful collection development and continuity, from a common mission to varying services developed with a precise focus on their particular reality. Questions and comments from participants will be very welcome.

Moderators
avatar for Lynn Wiley

Lynn Wiley

Head of Acquisitions, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Speakers
avatar for Michele Casalini

Michele Casalini

CEO, Casalini Libri
Michele Casalini is CEO of the family-run company Casalini Libri, which supplies bibliographical data, books and journals to libraries, and offers e-content through the Torrossa platform, thanks to its dedicated Digital Division. Following studies in Modern Languages and Literature... Read More →
DR

Dirk Raes

Managing Director, Erasmus Boekhandel
ZS

Zina Somova

Director of Operations, EastView Information Services
Databases, books and serials in print and e-formats from countries of the former Soviet Union (Russia, Ukraine, etc.), Eastern Europe, East Asia (China, Korea, etc. and Middle East. Foreign language materials in all formats.



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

Wrangling Services Contracts in Libraries
When librarians speak of negotiating contracts, they usually are referring to licensed electronic resources, negotiating terms as advised in the Center for Research Libraries' LibLicense Model and other best practices. Comparatively overlooked in librarians' conversations about licensing are memberships and service agreements. The objective of this session is to tackle an essential but often overlooked element of collections management: wrangling contracted services, be they consortial memberships, hosting agreements, outsourced work, proxy solutions, or any of the myriad other services that libraries may contract out to support collections and discovery. Service agreements pose a dramatically different set of concerns and priorities from the usual concerns, such as perpetual access and ILL rights, which dominate library literature about licensing. Few of us would think to reduce liability by striking "membership" and writing "participation agreement" in its place. Even fewer would think to steer clear of allusions to "consortium," as the term has legal meaning distinct from its use in library parlance. Attendees will engage with the presenter and with one another not only through Q&A but also through extemporaneous workshopping of key questions about best practices. Attendees will leave this session with a clearer understanding of how to maximize value on investment and limit jeopardy on contracted services delivered to their organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Rodriguez

Michael Rodriguez

Collections Strategist, University of Connecticut
:bicycle emoji:



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am EDT

You Set the Scene: Three Faculty-centered Approaches to Digital Publishing from Mellon's 2014-2015 Scholarly Communications Initiative
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's 2014-2015 Scholarly Communications Initiative funded more than 13 projects of various sizes and orientations as part of an effort to strengthen the scholarly monograph publishing ecosystem in a time of increasing disruption. It has not always been obvious to onlookers if or how the projects funded by this experiment will ultimately connect, but a recent report from Simon Fraser University ("Reassembling Scholarly Communications: An Evaluation of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Monograph Initiative," May 2016) helps to clarify points of thematic alignment, overlap, and divergence among them. While many of the funded projects are explicitly based in university presses (with the goal of either enhancing existing monograph programs or developing digital capacity where little or none exists), three projects (those at Brown, the University of Connecticut, and the University of Illinois) are instead focused on developing digital publication capacity for faculty outside of the traditional press framework. The "You Set the Scene" session brings together members from each of these three projects to investigate unique and complementary dimensions of their work. The audience will learn about developing project outcomes and encouraged to participate in discussion related to large-scale shifts in structural and cultural approaches to faculty-led digital scholarship production and publication.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Senior Lecturer, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment... Read More →
LG

Liz Glass

Digital Scholarship Editor, Brown University Library, Brown University
SS

Sara Sikes

Associate Director, Greenhouse Studios at UConn


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Boom and Bust: Short-Term Loans Five Years Later
The University of Kansas (KU) Libraries began a demand-driven acquisition program for e-books in late 2011, which included short-term loans (STLs). At that time, STLs cost 5-10% of a book's list price, with libraries paying no more than 130% when actually purchasing an e-book. The literature from the early years praises the new purchasing model as cost effective, often saving libraries thousands of dollars annually. However, in 2014, the cost of STLs began to increase, with a handful of publishers charging as high as 30-35% per loan. In FY14, the KU Libraries saw a sudden 122% increase in the cost of their STL expenditures and a 277% increase in the overall cost of their e-book purchases. Alarmed by this sudden increase, KU librarians began looking for solutions to save money, including lowering the number of loans from three to two before triggering a purchase. Unfortunately, STL costs at KU continued to rise the following year by 32%. STLs were no longer working as a cost-saving measure, and publisher pricing for STLs has continued to rise, some to as much as 40-50% of the cost of a book.

In this session, KU librarians will discuss the analysis of trends and practices they reviewed and changes made over the past five years in order to reclaim e-DDA as a cost effective model. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss challenges and share different approaches to sustaining costs regarding e-DDA models at their local institutions.

This session was co-authored by Lea Currie, Head of Content Development, University of Kansas Libraries, who was unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Sherri Brown

Sherri Brown

Literatures & Humanities Librarian, University of Kansas



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Building eBook Collections for the Long Term: A Charlotte Initiative Update

By March 2017, the Mellon funded “Principles for Permanent Acquisition of eBooks for Academic Libraries” will produce recommendations for the licensing and acquisition of eBooks.  The goal is to support the ability of academic libraries to build eBook collections for the long term.

At the heart of the project are three core principles proposed for eBook licenses:

  1. Unlimited simultaneous users
  2. No Digital Rights Management (DRM)
  3. Irrevocable perpetual access and archival rights

The UNC Charlotte based Project Team and Working Group of  librarians, consortia, and non-profit publishers collaborates to guide the project.  Please join us for brief updates on research in progress (course use, user experience, licensing terms, ILL, platforms and preservation models, and publisher practices.  Come with your questions and discuss how you can help the project succeed. 


Speakers
avatar for Alison Bradley

Alison Bradley

Director, Strategic Initiatives, PALCI
avatar for Steve Cohn

Steve Cohn

Director, Duke University Press
avatar for Chuck Hamaker

Chuck Hamaker

Professor Emeritus, UNC Charlotte
avatar for October Ivins

October Ivins

Principal and Consultant, Ivins eContent Solutions
October was an academic librarian for 20 years at UNC and LSU, and was an executive at two Boston area publishing services dot coms.  She is an independent consultant to publishers and other content providers, associations, libraries, and consortia.  Projects typically include market... Read More →
avatar for Christine Peterson

Christine Peterson

Engagement & Emerging Technologies Coordinator, Amigos Library Services
As part of a team at Amigos Library Services, I manage the SImplyE implementation project. Talk to me if you are interested in either hosting SimplyE for yourselves or having us host the app for your patrons.
ES

Elizabeth Siler

Collection Development Librarian, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Collection Development Librarian at UNC Charlotte. I manage the acquisition and decision making process for both our print and electronic materials as well as managing the budget. I am especially interested in textbook affordability and open access publishing as... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Cerebral Hemispheres of Scholarly Communication
A panel discussion about Scholarly Presses and information/data sharing with Library Administration and universities. Information and data sharing between libraries and Scholarly publishers present an array of unanswered questions. Among them are: How can publishers, libraries, and universities better support each other in a way that is sustainable in an era of budget cuts, staff changes, and diminished returns? What can libraries and universities learn from editorial boards and sales departments and what information is useful to achieve greater understanding of faculty needs? What types of sensitivities evolve around approaching faculty on both ends of the spectrum and what data and narrative is needed to better address those crucial issues?

This session will start to answer some of these questions, presenting case studies that look at how we might work together for mutual benefit.

Speakers
avatar for Galadriel Chilton

Galadriel Chilton

Director of Collections Initiatives, Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation
Galadriel is the Director of Collections Initiatives for the Ivy Plus Libraries, a cooperative of 13 academic libraries. The Ivy Plus Libraries are Brown, Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Duke, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, MIT, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, and... Read More →
avatar for Emily Farrell

Emily Farrell

Sales Manager, Northeast, De Gruyter
avatar for Jesse Koennecke

Jesse Koennecke

Director, Acquisitions & E-Resource Licensing, Cornell University
Ask me about Battledecks@ER&L!
avatar for Boaz Nadav-Manes

Boaz Nadav-Manes

Associate University Librarian for Access Services and Collection Management, Brown University
Boaz Nadav-Manes is the Associate University Librarian for Access Services and Collection Management at Brown University Library. In this role, he oversees the allocation and expenditure of the Libraries' collections budget, and the ongoing management of services and staff that advance... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Collection Dashboards for Selectors
While collections dashboards are often used as an external communications tool, they have additional applications for improving internal processes and assisting subject selectors. The result of a collaboration between a subject selector, data librarian, and collection development librarian, this presentation focuses on the identification of data sources, the process of parsing collection data by subject area, and practical visualizations to support evidence-based decision making in subject collection development. Of particular interest to attendees may be visualization techniques for linking multiple data sources, from acquisitions data to holdings data, publisher provided usage data and library collected user experience data. Using Tableau, the presenters have developed dashboard frameworks to support collections decision making.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Cronk

Lindsay Cronk

Coordinator of Online Resources and Collections, University of Houston
Collections person.
WG

Wenli Gao

Communication, Sociology, and Anthropology Librarian, University of Houston



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Content as a Community Asset: What Happens When It Loses Its Traditional Container?
Publishers who are exploring new approaches to packaging their content in ways that don't fit into the definition of article or book or monograph will answer the following questions:

  • What happens to the value of content when it is no longer bound within a defined container, e.g. journal or book or monograph, and instead becomes one part of a targeted collection based on user interests and behaviors? 
  • And how does it impact publishers and librarians? 
  • Are users better served by targeted content in all ways?
  • And how about OA - what are the impacts of applying OA to an "unbound" piece of content?
  • What are the groupings of content and connections between content that become possible without the constraints of an arbitrary container? 
  • Are there ways that the community can be brought together around content online?

A librarian will provide perspective on how removing content from traditional containers affects their buying decisions as well as their user communities. And a platform technology provider will share insight into usage trends captured via the platform that can be leveraged to help publishers in experimenting with packaging content in this way.

Speakers
TB

Tom Beyer

Director of Platform Services, PubFactory
avatar for Ove Kahler

Ove Kahler

Director Operations, BRILL
WQ

Wendy Queen

Director, Project MUSE
avatar for Ronda Rowe

Ronda Rowe

UT System Licensing and Communications Librarian, University of Texas at Austin
Ronda Rowe is the UT System Licensing and Communications Librarian for the University of Texas Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. In this position, she is responsible for developing and implementing effective and efficient license negotiations and processing for the... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Elements of Superior Scholarly Publishing Support: Going Well Beyond the Platform
With Open Access platforms abounding today everyone has access to the 'physical' means to publish scholarly books or journals; however, scholarly publishing is a much more complicated, complex process than providing technical tools and web access. The traditional scholarly presses have developed deep resources and skills that service scholar-authors throughout the process of publication, distribution, communication and the awards cycles. This program looks deeper into the process of publication - and the best practices of the best presses - to better understand this critical aspect of publication in these changing times.

Speakers
NH

Nancy Herther

Sociology/Anthropology Librarian, University of Minnesota
avatar for Elisabeth Leonard

Elisabeth Leonard

Senior Field Editor, SAGE Publications
avatar for Lisa Nachtigall

Lisa Nachtigall

Sales Strategy and Operations, Consultant
I spent the last 8 years at Wiley with responsibility for the academic sales strategy and operations for digital books. My primary focus is on library channels. In addition to the development of sales and pricing models for Wiley Online Library, I also set Wiley’s strategies for... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

It's 2031: Do You Know Where Your Scholarly Monographs Are?
This panel discussion will focus on the work the Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust [EAST] project is engaged in to protect print scholarly resources for the future. EAST is a collaboration of 48 academic and research libraries, primarily in the Northeast, that has developed a retention program to protect over 6 million scholarly monographs at least through 2031. The panel includes representatives from the EAST project team, the vendor with whom EAST worked on the collection analysis, and participating libraries. The audience will be asked to participate through polling and feedback on each of the major topics discussed, which include:

  • The EAST collection analysis - how 40 libraries, over only a 9-month period, came to agree on a model for retention and what the implications are for other regional and national shared print initiatives
  • Validation Sample Study - the process of sampling 240,000 items in 40 libraries to develop an "availability metric" and how this work can inform future retention modeling as well as ongoing research
  • Developing policies for shared print - the challenges of developing consensus across the diverse EAST membership on policies and operating procedures
  • Building a sustainable model for shared print - how EAST is working to expand to other libraries in region and evolve a business model for ongoing sustainability
  • What EAST could mean for access to scholarly content in the future - what are the implications for traditional "ILL" of large-scale projects such as EAST and how might EAST change collection development across the region.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Barnes

Matt Barnes

Director, Sustainable Collection Services, OCLC
Matt has been working in the academic library community since 2002 and has held senior-level positions at Blackwell Book Services, ebrary, and ProQuest. He is particularly interested in transforming data into insights that help libraries advance their mission.
avatar for Lorraine Huddy

Lorraine Huddy

Librarian for Collaborative Projects, CTW Library Consortium
avatar for Matthew Sheehy

Matthew Sheehy

University Librarian, Brandeis University
Matthew Sheehy is the university librarian, overseeing all of the operations of the Brandeis University Library. His goal is to provide services and collections that augment learning and research activities, as well as enhance the experience of the Brandeis Community. Prior to joining... Read More →
avatar for Susan Stearns

Susan Stearns

Executive Director, Boston Library Consortium & Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust
Susan Stearns is the Executive Director of the Boston Library Consortium (BLC) and Project Director for the Eastern Academic Scholars’ Trust (EAST) shared print initiative. She coordinates the activities of the EAST Project Team, works closely with the Executive Committee and is... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Library Consortia and Article Processing Charges: An International Survey
In the rapidly changing scholarly communications landscape, article processing charges (APCs) have emerged as a complex issue for libraries. This presentation presents the results of a survey of international library consortia (ICOLC) and explores the role of library consortia in relation to article processing charges. What are the issues to think about? What are some of the larger implications of library engagement with this new business model? What are the challenges for the future?

Speakers
avatar for Tony Horava

Tony Horava

Associate University Librarian, Content and Access, University of Ottawa
The Big Deal has been a major challenge at our university, as we dealt with budget cuts, exchange rate issues, annual increases to the costs of scholarly resources, and the demand for new resources in many fields. The Big Deal is a complex iceberg floating in the middle of all this... Read More →
avatar for Monica Ward

Monica Ward

Senior Licensing Officer, Canadian Research Knowledge Network



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Moneyball 2.0: Where are we today?
Based on the success of last years' session at Charleston, librarians will hear from our panel where are today using the idea of playing Moneyball in librarianship.

In the current information landscape, it is important for libraries and publishers to develop collaborative relationships to better understand user needs from a variety of perspectives. By working together to building collective knowledge around discovery, access and usage trends this information impacts and institutions' collection development. In this session, we'll review where Columbia, Rutgers and Syracuse are today in using data to make decisions.

One year later hear from our librarians who played Moneyball in librarianship and what a difference it has made in how they use data to make decisions and the impact it has had.

Speakers
avatar for Tommy Doyle

Tommy Doyle

Senior Vice President and General Manager of RELX’s Science & Technology Research Reference Business, Elsevier
Tommy Doyle is the Senior Vice President and General Manager of RELX’s Science & Technology Research Reference Business (formerly known as the Science & Technology Books Group). He is responsible for delivering overall performance and ensures the business is positioned for future... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Goertzen

Melissa Goertzen

Collection Development Analysis & Support Librarian, Columbia University Libraries
I am the Collection Development Analysis & Support Librarian at Columbia University. Much of my work involves monitoring budgets, examining business models, and analyzing workflows. In 2016, I completed a two year assessment project that examined how e-books are used for research... Read More →
GS

Gracemary Smulewitz

Head, Collection Services, Rutgers University
Gracemary Smulewitz is the Head of Collection Services and Resource Sharing at Rutgers University Libraries. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in Romance Languages from the University of Tennessee and a Master of Library Science from Rutgers University. Ms. Smulewitz has worked with... Read More →
avatar for Scott Warren

Scott Warren

Associate Dean for Research Excellence, Syracuse University Libraries
Scott is the Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship at the Syracuse University Libraries. He provides strategic guidance for collection management, scholarly communication, and subject liaison librarian services. The department he leads plays a pivotal role in enhancing research... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Not Your Father's Faculty Bibliography: Making University Scholarly Output Shine
Academics have long sought to promote scholarly output. Some university departments publish partial bibliographies of faculty scholarship, maintained by department staff, and hosted on department webpages. Many libraries enter scholarship into their institutional repository (IR), or encourage faculty to enter metadata and upload manuscripts as they publish. The results tend to be incomplete and the content is siloed in the IR. With access to data sources, metadata skills, and discovery services, librarians can streamline the creation of a centralized bibliography and increase the discovery of faculty scholarship.

The University of Central Florida (UCF) took an unusual approach to showcase scholarship - attempting to produce a comprehensive, retrospective, faculty bibliography and highlight faculty-authored content in their EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS). Now, in UCF's EDS, a mascot icon appears next to any article by a UCF author, even if the record is from a commercial index service.

The project involved new workflows and processes for collecting citations from Web of Science, and normalizing data; loading the metadata into the IR; and using MySQL and javascript to place a UCF icon in discovery results. In addition, the faculty bibliography metadata is harvested from the IR into EDS, ensuring that every item in the bibliography will be discoverable in UCF's EDS.

The presentation will detail choices and steps involved in creating the dataset; workflows to ingest and represent items in the IR and discovery systems; considerations for ongoing maintenance and future developments; and challenges of assessing the outcome of highlighting faculty works in EDS.

Speakers
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries
avatar for Ryan Otto

Ryan Otto

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Kansas State University
Native Floridian living in the Flint Hills of Kansas. Ryan Otto is a Scholarly Communication Librarian and Assistant Professor at Kansas State University Libraries' Center for the Advancement of Digital Scholarship. Ryan helps support the research lifecycle and land-grant mission... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Of Pigs and Pythons: Ingesting and Digesting a Major Media Collection
In 2015, the Michigan State University Libraries acquired the Rovi Media Collection, consisting of more than 800,000 CDs, DVDs and video games. Accepting this transformative collection entailed a commitment to make it accessible to residents of the State of Michigan through our statewide network as well as to the larger scholarly community. This commitment coheres with MSU's land grant mission, but the sheer size of the collection, and the diversity of the materials within it, has challenged us in a number of ways.

While most libraries have curated small multimedia collections over many years, Rovi has instantly increased our holdings over 26 times (from 30,000 to over 800,000). This raises technical and logistical challenges, particularly for metadata and description, circulation, and physical processing of materials that are starkly different from the majority of our collections. In addition, assumptions about use patterns, accessibility and workflows have all been challenged. As our goal is to make this collection more widely available, we grapple with the reality of suddenly having a collection so large and so popular that we risk our ability to provide services to our primary user community, our university, in order to meet the demand of the public and the greater research community.

This conversation will seek to explore how large scale collection changes can or should transform fundamental roles and core functions of academic libraries. What sacrifices should we make to provide unique, non-traditional library materials in a traditional academic space?

Speakers
avatar for Terri Miller

Terri Miller

Assistant Director for Public Services, Michigan State University Libraries
avatar for Jessica Sender

Jessica Sender

Nursing Librarian and Coordinator of Technology Labs, Michigan State University Libraries


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Open Access: Tackling the Issues of Organization within Libraries
Open Access has come a long way, yet it did not change academic publishing fundamentally. The big publishers hold 50% of the OA market by now, and OA publishing is becoming a volume game just as subscription-based publishing is. 

Why are large publishers successful in adapting to new business models and finally embrace them with high economic success? The presentation argues that smaller publishers can learn a lot from their large counterparts.

A clear understanding of processes within their target groups as well as customer-focused, efficient workflows as well as a deep integration with the ecosystem of researchers and librarians oftentimes makes the difference in getting selected as a partner for research institutions.The new business reality of startups gives smaller publishers the opportunity to interact with their customers through a lot of models by cooperating. The question about "build or buy" needs an extension - "cooperate." No doubt, this expanding mechanism offers new opportunities, and it needs an adapted skill set for all players involved. The presentation will lay out the field, giving a number of empirical examples.

Speakers
avatar for Sven Fund

Sven Fund

Managing Director, Knowledge Unlatched
I am passionate about making Open Access work for both publishers and librarians.
avatar for Catherine Morse

Catherine Morse

Government Information, Law and Political Science Librarian, University of Michigan


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Overcoming Data Source Limitations When Analyzing an E-book Collection By Subject
In order to understand the needs of schools and departments they serve and assess relevance of their collections academic libraries conduct various evaluation projects. Columbia University Health Sciences Library is committed to performing regular reviews of the departments at the Medical Center. Part of those reviews includes analyzing e-book coverage and use.

COUNTER reports are the best tools libraries have to track e-resource usage, but lack of detail may cause problems when performing detailed, subject-based analysis of e-book collections. While COUNTER reports include standardized usage data, they lack all but the most basic of bibliographic information.

So, how to optimize library analysis of these reports on a subject-specific basis?

In this session the audience will learn the methodology used by HSL in two review projects. In a first project, HSL used advanced filtering in Excel to limit the Counter Report to titles relevant to a subject area under review, and then hand reviewed the list. In a second project, HSL developed a program to look up COUNTER-provided ISBNs via Z39.50, which provided additional bibliographic information for analysis.

The methodology used should be reproducible and applicable to any subject area in Sciences or Humanities

Speakers
MK

Michael Koehn

Director for Library Operations, Augustus C. Long Health Sciences Library, Columbia University


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Rolling in the Deep Analytics: Big Data Comes to Scholarly Communication
What is big data? What can we learn by mining the deep connections embedded within scholarly information? How can big data tools provide intelligent analysis in a manner that materially impacts researchers, librarians, and publishers? What type of infrastructure development is required? This session will delve into these questions and explore what a number of innovative organizations are doing today to make sense of global research at a firehose scale. Specific topics to be covered include the extraction of entities and connections from across the corpus of scholarly articles; the development of meaningful "at scale" analysis; how vast quantities of information can be distilled into services useful for a range of stakeholders; and what libraries can do to support big data projects originating on campus.

Speakers
avatar for Greg Tannanbaum

Greg Tannanbaum

Strategic Partnerships, Meta
Greg Tananbaum serves as a consultant to publishers, libraries, universities, and information providers as owner of ScholarNext (www.scholarnext.com). ScholarNext clients include Facebook, Microsoft, SPARC, Meta, and Annual Reviews.  He has been President of The Berkeley Electronic Press, as well as Director of Product Marketing for EndNote. Greg writes a regular column in Against the Grain covering emerging developments in the f... Read More →
avatar for Anita de Waard

Anita de Waard

Vice President, Research Collaborations, Elsevier
ZX

Zhiwu Xie

Associate Professor and Technology Development Librarian, Virginia Tech



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Rolling the Dice and Playing with Numbers: Statistical Realities and Responses
Librarians invest time gathering numbers about collections for various entities, such as accrediting groups, organizations, and their user communities. Gathering collections-related statistics regarding the numbers of things our libraries subscribe to or purchase, as well as the items our users use, often requires a significant investment in time. Definitions can be difficult to apply and some questions do not seem to reflect our current reality or demonstrate value.

Panelists will share perspectives on the challenges of annually gathering and recording collections-related statistics, understanding definitions, and complying with standards in which differences in interpretation can lead to radically different values reported. Presenters will share their practices, as well as suggestions for improving the process and focusing on what is meaningful and manageable. Attendees will be invited to share practices, and will come away with an understanding of the complexity of the process and suggestions from all present.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Cooper

Natasha Cooper

Collection Development and Analysis Librarian and Subject Librarian for Information Studies, Syracuse University Libraries
Tasha Cooper is collection development and analysis librarian for arts and humanities, as well as some social sciences and professional programs, and subject librarian for information studies at Syracuse University Libraries, in Syracuse, NY.
avatar for Kimberly Nolan

Kimberly Nolan

Resources Manager, SUNY Upstate Medical University
I provide leadership, planning and management of the Upstate Health Sciences Library collection. I also manage the resources budget; and oversees Document Delivery.
avatar for Michael Poulin

Michael Poulin

Head of Collection Management, Colgate University Libraries
Michael Poulin is the Head of Collection Management at Colgate University Libraries. He has served as Digital Resources Librarian and also as a Systems Librarian.
avatar for Nancy Turner

Nancy Turner

Associate Director for Organizational Research & Strategy Alignment, Temple University


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

Rolling the Dice or Calculating a Bet? How to Decide Which OA Project(s) to Support
Presenters at Charleston sessions have had much to say about open access (OA) publishing. Many examples of and advice about campus OA resolutions are available, the arguments in favor of OA are well rehearsed, and many projects vie for library and institutional dollars in an environment where APCs are astronomical and allocations for OA support compete with allocations for materials purchases. Increasingly, libraries are being asked to move beyond advocacy to funding OA initiatives. In this interactive session, we will address how librarians gain institutional and budgetary traction for and choose among OA publishing ventures. Session participants will gain insight into how panelists are managing OA selection and funding at their libraries, and will be encouraged to share their own views and experiences. Attendees can expect to learn more about how libraries make decisions to fund OA projects, how these decisions affect existing budget allocations, and how we handle the messaging to our stakeholders. The session is part of a research project that seeks to develop a typology of open access projects and a decision-making template for choosing among them. It is linked to a Lively Lunch during which participants will have the opportunity to workshop ideas for a library collections future in which most publications are open.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Gallagher

Erin Gallagher

Director of Collection Services, Reed College
Erin Gallagher is the Director of Collection Services at Reed College in lovely Portland, Oregon. Before that, she worked as the E-Resources & Serials Librarian at Rollins College in beautiful Orlando, Florida. Erin started her library career on the vendor side as a collection development... Read More →
avatar for Diane Graves

Diane Graves

Asst. VP for Academic Affairs & University Librarian/Professor, Trinity University (emerita)
I have been an advocate for Open Access since the early 2000’s. My institution, Trinity University (TX, USA) was the first private liberal arts college in the US to pass an Open Access policy (Oct., 2009). I served on the SPARC steering committee for three years, and have spoken... Read More →
avatar for Robert Kieft

Robert Kieft

Consultant, SCELC
Robert Kieft has worked at the libraries of Occidental College, Haverford College, and Stanford University. Retired from Occidental in the summer of 2015, he continues to work with SCELC and the Partnership for Shared Book Collections as a consultant on shared collections services... Read More →
MM

Maureen Morris

Research and Learning Services Librarian, Cornell University


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Shotgun Session: Management and Out of the Box Thinking/Entreprenuership Threads
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 Power Point presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1. Technical Services:  Off-Campus and Lovin' It! (Gail Julian)

Three years ago a major reorganization at Clemson University Libraries resulted in the merger of acquisitions, cataloging, government documents, and collection management into one Unit with five teams.  But this meant that team members were not necessarily sitting in close proximity to each other.  In fact, team members were spread out across the third floor, many in different offices.  At the same time, space issues were being discussed in the main library.  There was not enough seating for students with many sitting on the floor and in every nook and cranny.  Non-library services had or were interested in moving into Library space to take advantage of the wealth of students studying there.  The need for space and the belief that we were a backroom operation that didn't work directly with faculty and students led to the decision to move the Technical Services & Collection Management Unit off-campus to the Clemson Research Park where high-density storage, records management, and our digitization lab were already housed.  This session will describe the feelings of both public service and technical service staff and faculty about the move, the planning and logistics of the move, the challenges and advantages of being off-site, and what the future holds.  The aim of this session is to offer information and advice to any organization that is contemplating such a move.    

2. A R(eally) F(un) P(rocess) - Surviving an RFP (Annette Day)

University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Libraries has recently undertaken an RFP process to replace its current installation of Innovative’s Millennium ILS. This shotgun session will provide an overview of the process with the aim of sharing best practices and lessons learned. It is hoped that the information shared in this session will benefit other libraries as they plan and move forward with similar RFP projects.  

3. Catching their attention. Using non-formal information sources  to captivate and motivate undergraduates during library sessions. (Jacqueline Nash)

Students at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica are required to complete a course on research and writing for academic purposes. Students are scheduled to visit the library for a hands-on session in the library's computer laboratory. Some are eager to learn but others arrive late or seem distracted.How can the librarian as presenter engage these students? How can we motivate them to acquire the research skills required in academia? Sometimes we fail to motivate because we are not adapting our approach to incorporate aspects of users' life experiences. We must first capture their immediate attention and then encourage their academic curiosity. How can we stimulate them to become information detectives? We should not teach without stimulating their interest. What are the non-academic sources of information that have impacted the lives of Caribbean students prior to arrival at university? It wasn’t the journals or scholarly books. In the foreground it would have been high-school text-books, but in the background it was other, less-formal, sources of information. These include radio, television, music, newspapers, and websites and social media. Examples of these non-formal information sources will be presented using images. e.g. photographs. By using these non-formal sources as examples The audience may be asked for a show-of hand, in response. e.g. who has visited the English-speaking Caribbean? They may be asked to identify a Caribbean journal, or Nobel Prize winner. The audience can expect to gain information and insight of another, non-American society and culture. 

4. Library Workflow Exchange: Because Your Library Already Answered the Question We Have (Robert Heaton)

As libraries and library departments reorganize around new systems, products, and staffing models, we often wonder how other libraries are handling the same processes. We can search the literature, but libraries do much more behind the scenes than that small cross-section of what is appropriate for publication, and relevant documentation of workflows is not consistently discoverable among other types of research. Library Workflow Exchange was created as an innovative and centralized repository of curated links to policies, processes, tutorials, and toolkits that document best practices or simply outline how things are done at other institutions. Since the project began in 2015, it has quickly grown to over 160 posts and has received 14,000 page views. In this session you will be introduced to the site and see how it can contribute to the workflow decisions you are making at your institution. Get straight to the work-process information that you need by searching Library Workflow Exchange and join us in building a community-driven resource by contributing the documentation that you have created. 

5. The Noble Science of Naming Conventions (Michael Rodriguez)

Collections managers acquire a huge volume and variety of records over the years: email chains, title lists, usage data, policies and procedures, vendor communiques, price quotes, meeting minutes, documentation, and more. After a few years and staff changes, these records may come to resemble an "explosion in a shingle factory," as a critic once termed Pablo Picasso's first Cubist painting. How can collections managers and colleagues prevent chaos by standardizing and sustaining records management practices? Specifically, how can they implement helpful and consistent naming conventions? With the goal of motivating librarians to audit and clean up their data, this presentation will give humorous examples of good, bad, and ugly nomenclature and share tips on optimizing naming conventions in library departments' electronic and paper archives. Attendees will leave able and motivated to master the noble science of nomenclature, ensuring the discoverability of their internal data. 

Moderators
avatar for Glenda Alvin

Glenda Alvin

Associate Professor, Assistant Director for Collection Management and Administration Head, Acquisitions and Serials, Library, Tennessee State University

Speakers
avatar for Annette Day

Annette Day

Div Director, Collections/Acquisitions/Discovery, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries
avatar for Robert Heaton

Robert Heaton

Collection Management Librarian, Utah State University
Looking for answers: How will we keep paying for all this stuff? How are we going to archive all this digital stuff? How can we align author incentives, the publishing marketplace, and the future of the scholarly record? When will libraries benefit from well-designed free software... Read More →
GJ

Gail Julian

Head of Technical Services & Collection Management, Clemson University Libraries
avatar for Jacqueline Howell Nash

Jacqueline Howell Nash

Graduate students` librarian, University of the West Indies (Mona)
I have been a librarian for only 7 years and enjoy working one-on-one with graduate students of varying ages. Previously I worked as a Social Worker and then as an Administrator, first in central government and then in higher education. At my university the professional librarians... Read More →
avatar for Michael Rodriguez

Michael Rodriguez

Collections Strategist, University of Connecticut
:bicycle emoji:



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

Strengthening Regional Collections One Request at a Time: Using Resource Sharing Technology to Facilitate Coordinated Collection Development
Academic library users in NYS benefit from the connection between resource sharing and collection development, where interlibrary loan is important and shared collections are valued. A need existed to connect the dots between library collection development and resource sharing cooperatives, where the strength of resource sharing groups is the strength of the combined, diversified collections of its members. The session will provide an overview of the need, illustrate the proposed solution, outline the implementation and plans for the future. The first phase of the project was to create a tool to develop collections reactively, by matching patron loan requests with a corresponding library's collection strengths, as indicated by a match with the library's collection building tool, and then provide libraries with communication and reports about requests within their desired collection areas. This tool makes use of IDS Logic, a service that helps automate workflows and provides data analysis tools for libraries using ILLiad resource sharing software.

Objective: We will demonstrate the use of technology to assist in true coordinated collection development, including the software need, the development of a patron-focused consortial collection analysis tool, and how the program works.

The audience will discuss
  • Solutions to barriers 
  • Strategies for scaling to libraries with varying needs
  • Strategies for deployment at libraries with more independent departments

Attendees will learn how two librarians from different departments partnered with an established resource sharing cooperative to automate the communication of targeted suggestions for purchase at partner libraries, an innovative solution to spark interest in cooperative collection development where previously there was resistance.

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Pritting

Shannon Pritting

Director of Library and Learning Resources, SUNY Polytechnic Institute
Shannon is currently the Library Director at the newly formed SUNY Polytechnic Institute, with sites in Albany and Utica NY. He has held positions in a variety of library areas including Reference, Instruction, Instructional Design, Resource Sharing, and Access Services. He has also... Read More →
avatar for Kate Ross

Kate Ross

Head of Technical Services, St. John Fisher College, Lavery Library
Kate Ross is the Head of Technical Services/Acquisitions Librarian at St. John Fisher College's Lavery Library in Rochester, NY. Since Kate was responsible for Interlibrary Loan in previous positions, she seeks out opportunities to work with Kourtney and other Interlibrary Loan practitioners... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EDT

The Nuts & Bolts of Supporting Change and Transformation for Research Librarians
Libraries have a rich tradition of providing services and support to researchers. In recent years changing technology, evolving research methods and requirements, and the transforming landscape of scholarly communication have revealed a need for libraries to actively engage scholars and participate in the entire research lifecycle. As liaison and subject librarian roles shift to a more holistic and engagement-focused model, it is important that libraries provide them with the tools and resources to develop new skills.

In this session we will focus on three ways in which the NCSU Libraries created and supported relevant training and opportunities for research librarians to gain the expertise necessary to embrace new roles and deeper collaboration across the research enterprise. Examples include: the Data and Visualization Institute for Librarians, the Visualization Discussion series, and the Research Data Committee.

Attendees will be invited to share their perspectives and experiences around the evolving role of research librarians and the training and resources necessary for gaining new skills. Participants will learn about some of the skills necessary for increased engagement, take away ideas for creating peer to peer learning opportunities, and gain insights about the challenges and opportunities related to supporting and developing new skills.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Tebbe

Heidi Tebbe

Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science, NC State University Libraries
Heidi Tebbe is the Collections & Research Librarian for Engineering and Data Science at North Carolina State University. She manages collections for subjects including engineering, computer science, physics, astronomy, and data science.
avatar for Mira Waller

Mira Waller

Department Head, Research Engagement, Libraries, North Carolina State University



Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EDT

What Do You have Invested in Your Collection?: Identifying Your Digital Assets
Libraries are increasingly concerned with demonstrating the return on investment for collection budgets. But little thought is given to defining the investment itself. The investment can identified simply as the expenditures in given areas or types of material. But are their more fundamental ways of thinking about this investment? There are and we need to give them consideration both in calculating and publicizing our returns on investment and in meeting the requirements of the auditors who monitor and certify our business practices.

In 2013, our auditors came to the realization that their practices still assumed collections consisting solely of tangible objects - print journals, books, indexes, microforms, and so forth - and needed to address the digital collection that contained a varied mixture of owned and leased titles. Library staff in charge of business operations, acquisitions, and collection development responded by developing practices and procedures to identifying assets and non-assets and allow the auditors both to understand how identifications were made and to verify the identifications are correct.

Participants in this session will hear how we developed new practices and procedures in response to our auditors' demands. We will describe our identification of contracts language that translates into such identifications and allows auditors to verify our judgments. The participants will also learn how our increased awareness of such distinction has lead us to see our collections in ways divorced from the assumptions of the print environment.

Speakers
NB

Nancy Beals

Coordinator of Acquisitions and Electronic Resources, Wayne State University Library System
RB

Rachel Beatty

Director of Business Affairs, Wayne State University Library System
PB

Paul Beavers

Coordinator for Collection Development and Assessment, Wayne State University Library System
AM

Adeeb Mozip

Manager of Financial Affairs, Wayne State University Library System


Friday November 4, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm EDT
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

A Tale of Two Campuses: Open Educational Resources in Florida and California Academic Institutions
Open Educational Resources (OER) provide a high-quality and low-cost alternative to traditional textbooks. The University of Central Florida (UCF) and the University of San Diego (USD) have been engaged in a multitude of efforts related to textbook affordability. This presentation will discuss the textbook affordability climate at the national, state (Florida and California), and local (UCF and USD).

The University of Central Florida constituents will highlight an unique partnership with three different units across campus. Macro and micro ventures and lessons learned will be shared ranging from student perceptions of open education resources to influencing the next university bookstore contract, in addition to specific case studies with faculty teaching online and face-to-face courses.

Librarians at the University of San Diego will introduce the Copley Library OER initiative and an evaluation of the first year pilot experience. The speakers will also discuss plans to improve the program including collaborating with past participants, connecting with university stakeholders, and requesting more financial support.

Attendees will come away with numerous approaches to reduce textbook/course material cost to students. They will also be able to identify and collaborate with strategic partners as they consider textbook affordability efforts at their institutions.

Speakers
JH

Julia Hess

Collection Services and Metadata Librarian, University of San Diego
Julia Hess has served as the Collection Services and Metadata Librarian at Copley Library since July 2013. Her day-to-day work revolves around coordinating the ordering and cataloging of books and media to make sure faculty and students get the resources they need as quickly as possible... Read More →
AN

Alejandra Nann

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, University of San Diego
avatar for Sarah Norris

Sarah Norris

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Central Florida
Sarah Norris is Scholarly Communication Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries. In this role, she leads the Libraries’ Scholarly Communication and open access efforts, with an emphasis on scholarly publishing and copyright. She has presented at local, state, national... Read More →
JR

John Raible

Instructional Designer, UCF Center for Distributed Learning



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Access All Around: A NISO Update on Open Access Discovery and Access-Related Projects
In this session, members of the NISO Discovery to Delivery Topic Committee will discuss NISO projects, recommendations and standards dealing with hot topics around discovery and access of electronic content. Presentations will include updates on open access discovery, specifically the recommended practice Access and License Indicators (ALI) and discussion of a new project proposal regarding discoverability of open access material. In addition, we will discuss two new projects. The first involves automatic transfer of packages and institutional entitlements from information providers to knowledge bases for the identification of institutional access rights using the KBART recommended practice. The second work item refers to link origin tracking that allows information providers, particularly publishers to track originating access to their content. We will include examples of how this NISO work will help the different industry stakeholders in their everyday work. We hope for a lively discussion and feedback from the audience.

The mission of the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) is to foster the development and maintenance of standards that facilitate the creation, persistent management, and effective interchange of information so that it can be trusted for use in research and learning. NISO brings together publishers, libraries, and software developers to collaborate on mutually accepted standards — solutions that enhance operations today and form a foundation for the future.

Speakers
avatar for Pascal Calarco

Pascal Calarco

University Librarian, University of Windsor
I'm interested in approaches to doing library assessment at scale, digital scholarship in smaller libraries, newspaper digitization programmes, open access mandates and growing senior leaders in academic libraries.
avatar for John G Dove

John G Dove

Consultant, Paloma & Associates
I'm best known for the role I had in building Credo Reference into a well-respected online reference tool for libraries that is deeply linked into the resources of its host library--thereby serving one of the important features of an online encyclopedia. Since leaving Credo at... Read More →
avatar for Christine Stohn

Christine Stohn

Director Product Management, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
Christine Stohn is director of product management for discovery and delivery at Ex Libris. Christine has over 25 years of experience in the library and information industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. In her current role Christine... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Applying Entrepreneurship in a Changing Higher Education Landscape: Case Studies Involving Streaming Video
Higher education continues to change very rapidly with traditional modes for course delivery extended to include a variety of online, flipped, and distance education formats. Faculty need to find alternative ways to engage a new generation of students, millennial learners with their own learning styles, who expect and respect video. What does this change mean for course delivery and student performance, how are libraries supporting this changing environment to meet the needs of students and faculty, and how are content providers contributing? 

Into this space, entrepreneurship in many forms is meeting the changing environment head-on. This session presents librarian and faculty perspectives on how entrepreneurial thinking is driving student success both inside and outside of the classroom using streaming video as a case study, co-led by Dr. Sean Wise (Ryerson University, Toronto) and creator of The Naked Entrepreneur video series, himself an expert in the field of entrepreneurship. Dr. Sean Wise will demonstrate how he uses video to engage his student cohort, the merits of different contexts for using video and their effective outcomes, and will present evidence for how his novel approach has ramped up the motivations and performance of his students. Representing the library perspective, Michael Arthur (University of Alabama) will discuss the strategies used by The University of Alabama to select and acquire more video, and what factors are used to determine whether to purchase or lease content. He will also highlight the libraries efforts to promote streaming video and to educate librarians and faculty on the various purchasing and delivery models and how these impact usability. He will offer session attendees forward-thinking strategies for setting and accomplishing goals related to the integration of streaming video into the classroom. Michael will discuss the future of streaming video and what libraries are doing to make that happen.   Finally, Michael Carmichael (SAGE Publishing) will follow these two speakers by sharing insights from market research which shows how publishers might respond to the way in which video is being used in Higher Education globally.

Speakers
avatar for Michael A. Arthur

Michael A. Arthur

Head, Resource Acquisition & Discovery, The University of Alabama
Michael A. Arthur is Head, Resource Acquisition & Discovery at the University of Alabama. Mr. Arthur is active in ALA serving as a member of the ALCTS Budget & Finance Committee. This will be his 17th Charleston Conference. He has presented many times at the conference and also... Read More →
avatar for Michael Carmichael

Michael Carmichael

Head of Visual Media, SAGE Publishing
Michael Carmichael is the Head of Visual Media at SAGE Publishing. He has over 20 years of commissioning and editorial experience developing print and digital products for the higher education and academic market. Michael joined SAGE in 1998 where he first spent many years developing... Read More →
avatar for Sean Wise

Sean Wise

Assistant Professor, Entrepreneurship and Strategy, Ryerson University
Dr. Sean Wise specializes in helping emerging and high growth potential organizations jump on the trajectory and turn a profit. His intense, entertaining and direct approach has earned him a loyal following of disciples who swear by his lessons and best practices for business success.With... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Changing How Monographs Are Acquired in Response to Evolving Needs
In April of 2014, the University of Alberta Libraries (UAL) made a major shift in how we acquire monographs, moving from a distributed, subject selector-focused, slip-based model, to an approval only, e-preferred and PDA-led model. This change was implemented in response to the expanding and evolving roles of liaison librarians and the need for enhanced workflow efficiencies. With two years of data related to this transition and the impact of the new model, we will present an assessment of the impact of the new model. The objective of this presentation will be to provide insight to other librarians considering a shift to a more automated and centralized monograph acquisitions approach. We will discuss the reasons for rethinking how UAL approaches monograph acquisitions, the challenges of making such a significant change, and the impact of such change on our budget, collection composition, and staff roles, as well as anticipated future changes. We plan to engage the audience with conversation about their own experience in streamlining workflows, and other possible models that may work in different contexts. Attendees can expect to gain insight about making a major organizational shift, implementing change, and assessing the impact of a new model.

This session is co-authored by Trish Chatterley, Public Services Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries, who was unable to attend the conference. 

Speakers
avatar for Denise Koufogiannakis

Denise Koufogiannakis

Associate University Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Critical Collection Analysis: Using DH Tools to Contextualize Historical Collecting Patterns within a Political Framework
With the growth of digital humanities and a wide range of free and open source analysis tools at our fingertips, librarians have a unique opportunity to use these new tools to critically analyze library collections. Moving beyond usage and budgets, strategies such as text analysis, temporal pattern finding and data visualization offer insights into the structure and content of our collections, which in turn supports evidenced-based decision-making for future acquisitions. At the Claremont Colleges Library, librarians across divisions have been encouraged to learn tools and approaches to Digital Humanities, and apply these principles to our own work and relationships with researchers.

Using free digital scholarship tools such as TimelineJS and Voyant Tool, this team of librarians compared historical patterns of print book acquisitions to domestic and transnational acts of terrorism during a 20 year period from 1995 to 2015. The work offered insights into the subject categories of books purchased during this period in the context of significant political events. We also studied the relationships between words commonly found in the titles of terrorism-related texts, such as "terrorism and government" or "terrorism and religion" to uncover any potential biases in collecting.

This presentation will cover: methods for gathering historic acquisitions data; strategies for using Digital Humanities tools to both analyze and communicate findings; an overview of our findings on terrorism and collection development at Claremont; and potential future applications for the use of Digital Humanities tools to support collection assessment and development.

Speakers
avatar for Lydia Bello

Lydia Bello

STEM Team Librarian, Claremont Colleges Library
NC

Nina Clements

Social Sciences Team Librarian, Claremont Colleges Library
MD

Madelynn Dickerson

Information Resources Coordinator, Claremont Colleges Library
avatar for Margaret Hogarth

Margaret Hogarth

Resource & Acquisition Team Leader, Claremont Colleges Library
Margaret Hogarth is the Information Resources Acquisitions Team Leader at the Claremont Colleges Library, where she works with electronic resources, acquisitions and STEM-related services. She has an MLIS from California State University, San Jose and a Masters in Environmental Studies... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

DDA Management with Predictive Modeling
Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) programs have become an integral part of academic libraries' collecting strategies. While DDA programs provide an effective way to build a just in time collection, it can be difficult to anticipate how many titles will be triggered for purchase and what the financial impact will be. This presentation will describe a project to build a predictive model to flag DDA titles that are likely to be triggered for purchase within the first year of being added to the catalog. By implementing a predictive model, collections and acquisitions departments can better plan the yearly DDA budget. In addition, titles with a high probability of being triggered for purchase can be purchased if they become ineligible for DDA. We will discuss how we combined text analytics and structured data as inputs to the model using a combination of SAS and Python. In addition to the benefits of implementing a predictive model, we will also discuss the drawbacks and limitations involved.

Speakers
avatar for John Vickery

John Vickery

Analytics Coordinator and Collection Manager for Social Sciences, NCSU Libraries - North Carolina State University
I've been with the NCSU Libraries since 2005 and programming in SAS since 2009. I also work in Python. I'm interested in applying analytical methods to library data for better organization in matters such as collections and service optimization.



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

E-Resources Management as an Incubator: A Framework for Consortial Governance
The University System of Maryland & Affiliated Institutions (USMAI) Library Consortium was established in the early 1980s with resource sharing as its founding principle. Electronic resources were incorporated into this mission in the late 1990s and were managed primarily in a buyer's club arrangement until the last three years when the USMAI began to intentionally increase shared collection development activities and develop a new management structure. The number of centrally-funded e-resources shared by all libraries in the consortium has increased, licensing terms and inventory is under investigation, and data assessment policies and practices are under review. E-Resources management within and throughout the consortium has evolved from being the primary responsibility of a single librarian to the work of a committee with assistance from a third party consortial procurement agent and potentially a consortial licensing and data collection and assessment contractor. The USMAI is holistically developing a new foundation for the management of e-resources for an era of shared collection development by incorporating all of these elements and built upon a framework of shared governance - all without procurement authority at the consortial level or a specified budget for new e-resources. This has led to the generation of new management approaches to consortial ERM not previously discussed in the literature through an incubator approach. The establishment of shared governance will be presented from two viewpoints: Subgroup/committee members' perspectives on USMAI history, procurement realities, budgeting, framework development, and where we are today, and consortial administration's perspectives on the future of ERM for the USMAI.

Speakers
avatar for Lenore England

Lenore England

Asst. Director for Electronic Resources Management, UMUC
Lenore England is Assistant Director for Electronic Resources Management (ERM) at the University of Maryland University College. She has co-chaired several University of System of Maryland and Affiliated Institutions (USMAI) ERM task groups and committees and does fundraising for... Read More →
RL

Randall Lowe

Collection Development, Acquisitions & Serials Librarian, Frostburg State University
Randy Lowe has served in various positions in the Lewis J. Ort Library at Frostburg State University since 1997 and is currently Collection Development, Acquisitions & Serials Librarian. He has been responsible for the acquisition, licensing, data collection, and assessment of electronic... Read More →
CT

Charles Thomas

Executive Director, USMAI Library Consortium



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

First-Time Digital Collection Building: How to Manage Time, Resources, and Expectations
The goal of this panel is to bring together a group of librarians -- panelists and audience members -- who have created (or are looking towards creating) the first digital collections at their institution. Our three panelists have all been working on such projects over the last year. In addition to sharing the goals and priorities that motivated their institutions to start supporting digital collections, panelists will share their strategies, workflows, resource allocation decisions, successes, and lessons learned as a way of helping the larger community realize best practices for starting up support of digital collections. Attendees will be invited to give feedback on the strategies described by our panelists and to ask questions which could inform their own work.

Moderators
avatar for Erin McCall

Erin McCall

Professional Services Manager, ITHAKA/Artstor

Speakers
avatar for Maryska Connolly-Brown (she/her)

Maryska Connolly-Brown (she/her)

Technical Services Librarian, Hampden-Sydney College
Maryśka Connolly-Brown joined the Bortz Library faculty at Hampden-Sydney College in the summer of 2015 as the Technical Services Librarian. Her background includes teaching at the K-12 level, managing electronic resources, cataloging, archives, library systems, and serving as an... Read More →
DC

Dave Chatham

Library Director, Presbyterian College
avatar for David Wiseman

David Wiseman

Manager of Library Information Systems, Roanoke College
Dave Wiseman has been the Systems Librarian at Roanoke College since 2002. He has worked as a reference librarian in public libraries, a trainer for an ILS vendor, and a systems librarian. He developed the Campus Sustainability (recycling and green energy) program at Roanoke College... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Libraries and Publishers Working Together to Ensure Access and Limit Misuse
Libraries provide seamless access to electronic content for library users through EZproxy and identity management protocols. Securing access to this content while protecting patron privacy and limiting unnecessary interruptions to access has become increasingly important as bad actors continue to look for new ways to tap into libraries' subscriptions and gain unauthorized access to content. Libraries, publishers and OCLC all share a stake in developing best practices to ensure library patrons have access to quality content, when and where they need it.

This session will provide all stakeholders an opportunity to voice their points of view on this issue as part of a broader dialogue on how we can work together to increase security, drive users to the library for their information needs and reduce interruptions to e-content access while still protecting patron privacy.

The audience will be invited after the presentations to share additional points of view and considerations, offer details about what they have done to address this issue and ask the panel questions. Attendees can expect to learn about how all stakeholders are working to make e-content accessible and secure and best practices to implement at their own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Butler

Paul Butler

Library Technologies Support Analyst, Ball State University
Paul Butler has been a Library Technologies Support Analyst for the Ball State University Libraries since 2013. He has a MLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a B.S. in Anthropology from Ball State University. As a Library Technologies Support Analyst he manages... Read More →
avatar for Laura McNamara

Laura McNamara

Electronic Resources Librarian, Thomas Jefferson University
AW

Aaron Wood

Senior Director, Product Management, American Psychological Association
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Senior Manager, Discovery Partners, IEEE
Julie Zhu cultivates and manages effective working relationships with Discovery Service, Link Resolver, Proxy Service and Search Engine providers to maximize IEEE content findability, visibility and accessibility in multiple discovery channels. She serves in NISO’s Information Discovery... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Libraries, Censorship and 'Naked Lunch'
A presentation by Chicago attorney Bill Hannay exploring the role that libraries have played -- and continue to play -- in resisting ... and enforcing ... censorship. The discussion will include video excerpts of songs from the speaker's recently-produced musical comedy, "Naked Lunch: The Musical," which focuses on the obscenity trial of William Burroughs' novel in Boston in 1965.


Speakers
avatar for Leala Grindstaff

Leala Grindstaff

Theater Student, College of Charleston
avatar for William M. Hannay

William M. Hannay

Partner, Schiff Hardin LLP
Bill Hannay regularly counsels corporations and individuals with respect to federal and state antitrust law, intellectual property law, and other trade regulation laws. He is an Adjunct Professor, teaching courses at IIT/Chicago-Kent law school in antitrust and international business... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Mapping Change: An Examination of Curricular Shifts and Collection Impact
Whether adding a new course or ending a program, curricular changes represent a formal notification from the University to the library that it must support. At American University, all curriculum changes require, as part of the approval process, a library review. While these reviews are shared with collection managers, there has never been a systematic review of the effect the changes have had on purchasing and use. One of the most prohibitive factors in undertaking such as review is that curricular changes are often difficult to map to collections because they reflect interdisciplinary adjustments or courses that push the boundary of what one might associate with a subject, such as cooking with chemistry. With the tighter budgets, there is more of a need to track the use of materials and to ensure the library is properly responding to changes in the curriculum. Furthermore, many libraries are moving towards more automation of their acquisitions or relying more on patron driven plans. The need to assess how approval plans or other acquisition models are able to adjust to curricular change is largely unknown. In this paper, we will demonstrate a method of how to use Library of Congress Collection Policy Statements to index curricular changes and how to map those LOC subject terms to our Integrated Library System and electronic resource holdings. Once mapped, we will show how the curricular changes data can be compared to with any library collection data. Our analysis would be beneficial to collection managers and collection development librarians who want to retrospectively review curricular changes to determine if the change had any effect on library collections. We will show sample data reports from AU Library's holdings to demonstrate how this method can be used to analyze purchasing and usage data over time.

Speakers
MM

Michael Matos

Collection Development Analyst, The Library of Congress
JO

Jenise Overmier

Research & Instruction Librarian, Marymount University


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Nobody Knows and Nobody is Responsible: Issues in eBooks Workflow and Access
Hunter Library at Western Carolina University is a mid-sized academic institution managing ten large eBook packages and about 80,000 individual eBook titles. Managing eBooks involves working with multiple vendors and staff from different areas of technical services. This presentation will examine issues in eBook workflows; in particular we will share the results of a project to document our eBook workflows and utilize an existing technology, Microsoft SharePoint, to better manage our eBook workflow and share information and communication among necessary staff. The idea for this project came with the almost simultaneous hiring of the Electronic Resources Librarian and the Metadata Librarian, who took over the responsibility for loading eBook MARC records into the catalog. We found the existing workflow related to downloading MARC records from vendor's sites confusing because of the involvement of multiple units within the Technical Services department. We also noticed that there were questions from both users and library faculty about eBook user limits and download rights. These questions were not easily answered by looking at the catalog record nor could we find the information readily.

How might we share unique access information with users and public services staff? How might technical services staff better communicate with each other regarding their individual roles and responsibilities in this process? How do we maintain necessary information for technical services staff? This project is meant to not only deal with our eBook workflow but to help eliminate knowledge silos we see in our Technical Services department.

Speakers
avatar for Tina Adams

Tina Adams

Electronic Resources Librarian, Western Carolina University
I am currently the Electronic Resources Librarian at Western Carolina University. Previously I have worked as a Reference & Instruction Librarian at Norther Arizona University and a Distance Education Librarian at George Mason University.
PB

Paromita Biswas

Metadata Librarian, Hunter Library, Western Carolina University



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Rolling with the Wheels of Commerce: The Challenges of Business and Industry-based Resources
Collections librarians receive requests for specialized resources that may require use of passwords or other mediated access, local hosting, or special software. Sometimes (although not always) these resources are used in a business or industry setting, and their subscription and licensing process does not follow typical academic library acquisitions patterns. Librarians may also receive requests for raw data from a subscribed resource. How do librarians respond? How do vendors make decisions about which products to bring to the academic library market? At this session two librarians will share perspectives on these challenges and ways they accommodate these requests, and a vendor representative will provide insight into the product development decision-making process, including how providers decide which products will have licenses or access models typically used by academic libraries, and which will be offered via other models. Librarians wanting to find ways to respond to these kinds of user requests will have the opportunity to learn from the presenters and also to share their practices during Q&A. Vendor representative attendees are also welcome to share how companies make decisions about their offerings to various markets as well as to specialized user requests for access to their data. Collectively, we will consider how to “roll with the times” and be responsive to user needs.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Cooper

Natasha Cooper

Collection Development and Analysis Librarian and Subject Librarian for Information Studies, Syracuse University Libraries
Tasha Cooper is collection development and analysis librarian for arts and humanities, as well as some social sciences and professional programs, and subject librarian for information studies at Syracuse University Libraries, in Syracuse, NY.
avatar for Peter McCracken

Peter McCracken

Electronic Resources Librarian, Cornell University
I'm the Electronic Resources Librarian at Cornell University, and have been here since June 2016. Starting in 2019, I run a (very small) group called "E-Resources and Acquisitions Strategy", in which we'll try to make things better in our corner of the library, and then tell the world... Read More →
avatar for Darby Orcutt

Darby Orcutt

Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University Libraries
I am a librarian, teacher, researcher, and leader deeply interested and involved in interdisciplinary and computational research, the future of higher ed, and cultural aspects of digital transformation.Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University LibrariesFaculty... Read More →
avatar for Ellen Rotenberg

Ellen Rotenberg

Director, Product Management, Platform Services and Capabilities, Clarivate Analytics (Formerly the IP&Science business of Thomson Reuters)


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Shotgun Session: Digital Scholarship, Professional Development, and Scholarly Communication Threads
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1. Subject Selectors and Web Archiving at Cornell University Library (Suzanne Cohen)

This session will present the results of an exploration of Cornell University Library selectors' roles and perspectives on curating web resources.  While Cornell University Library has been preserving web content in a variety of collecting areas, including Cornell memory, subject-based content and special collections, since 2011, much of the curating has been led by archivists.  Cornell has over 50 subject selector librarians, divided into 4 disciplinary teams, and this infrastructure was used to engage selectors on the topic of web archiving over the past year.   Attendees will learn about the selector discussions, recommendations made to the Collection Development Executive Group and a pilot program to encourage selector involvement in web archiving. 
 
2. Evolving the Team, Expanding Skills for the Future: SMU Libraries' Skills Development for the Library Specialist. (Hwee Ming Lim)

SMU Libraries, like most libraries, is continuously evolving as the needs and expectations of library stakeholders (from users to administrators) change. To keep pace with the changes there is an emergent need to improve the skills and knowledge base of library para-professionals (Library Specialists) in order for them to continue to contribute productively to the strategic goals of the organization, especially as related to the Libraries' Continuous Assessment and Improvement Initiatiave.

The SMU Libraries' Future Skills program is a case study on how the Library Specialists and Team Leads worked together to build a talent management program that would foster stronger team dynamics, improve levels of efficiency and service sustainability in times of disruption and continuous change through functional cross-training, job redesign, and the creation of interdepartmental work arrangements. 

3. Towards Measuring Cost per Use of OA APCs Using Article Level Metrics (Crystal Hampson, Elizabeth Stregger) 

When libraries fund open access article processing charges (OA APCs), they often do so from their collections budget. With APCs at times costing $1,000, $2,000 or more per article, librarians sometimes express concern about the amount. Such statements imply a comparison of value for money between OA APCs and the traditional subscription model. Libraries commonly refer to cost per use, using COUNTER statistics, to measure value for money when evaluating traditional journal publishing purchases. These statistics measure institutional use for a given period, typically a year, and libraries calculate that use against the institution’s annual subscription cost. However, OA APCs pay for global, perpetual use, not annual, institutional use. How might libraries measure cost per use for OA APC payments? This session examines the possibility and limitations of one proposed method to measure cost per use of OA APCs using article level metrics and illustrates results with examples. Librarians, publishers and others are invited to comment, critique, and contribute ideas and experiences from their own institutions. Attendees will take away ideas for integrating article level metrics into collection management decisions and for demonstrating return on investment for OA APCs. 

4. Humanities Collaborations and Research Practices: Investigating New Modes of Collaborative Humanities Scholarship (Harriett Green, Angela Courtney) 

This lightning presentation will present preliminary findings from "Humanities Collaborations and Research Practices: Exploring Scholarship in the Global Midwest," (HCRP), a collaborative project led by librarians at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Indiana University that examines how collaborative and experimental research practices in the humanities affects scholarly practices, scholarly communication, and research outcomes.
The HCRP study examines a series of multi-institutional humanities research projects funded by the Humanities Without Walls (HWW) Global Midwest initiative, a Mellon Foundation-funded consortium of Midwest university humanities centers. We conducted 27 semi-structured interviews with scholars from diverse humanities disciplines who were HWW Global Midwest awardees. The interviews explore how scholars share data, build self-generated research environment infrastructures for supporting data sharing and communications, and frame their collaborations in the context of broader goals. The interview transcriptions were coded in ATLAS.ti and we are currently applying qualitative content analysis. In our preliminary analysis, the prominent themes emerging are:

  • Adaptive Research Practices: Scholars noted challenges in project management and organizing workflows between researchers with differing methodologies and disciplinary philosophies.
  • Diverse Modes of Scholarly Publication: Scholars employed diverse, frequently digital modes of dissemination and publication;  
  • Networks of Scholarship: The scholars frequently cited the networks of scholarship that they built through these collaborative projects, and how the research connected scholars to multiple academic and public communities.

Our presentation will offer new perspectives on scholarly communications and data curation in the humanities, as it will share valuable insights into how information professionals can engage with collaborative, experimental, and multi-modal research.

5. Building Collaborative Library/Faculty Digital Projects (Tim Bucknall)

A year ago, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro's Libraries began offering Digital Partners grants. UNCG faculty can apply for these grants through a competitive annual application process. The successful applicants receive up to $22,500 worth of Library IT resources and expertise to create their digital projects. Once built, the Libraries then commit to maintaining the digital scholarship and making it broadly available for the long term. This presentation will discuss the Digital Partners grant process, and the lessons learned during its first year of operation. 

Moderators
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Lead Librarian for Acquisitions/Budget Officer, Appalachian State University
Rachel Fleming is Lead Librarian for Acquisitions at Appalachian State University, where she manages the acquisition of all material types. She has previously served as Serials Librarian at Western Carolina University and Collection Development librarian at Central College in Pella... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bucknall

Tim Bucknall

Assistant Dean of Libraries, UNC Greensboro
Tim is founder and convener of the Carolina Consortium, and an inventor of Journal Finder, the first Open URL link resolver. He was recently named the 2014 ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year.
avatar for Suzanne Cohen

Suzanne Cohen

Collection Development Coordinator - Hospitality, Labor, and Management Library, Cornell University
avatar for Angela Courtney

Angela Courtney

Head, Arts and Humanities Department, Indiana University
avatar for Harriett Green

Harriett Green

Associate University Librarian, Washington University in St. Louis
I am the Associate University Librarian for Digital Scholarship and Technology Services at Washington University in St. Louis.
avatar for Crystal Hampson

Crystal Hampson

Assistant Librarian, University of Saskatchewan
Crystal Hampson is Acquisitions Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan, where she has worked since 2011. Prior to arriving at the University of Saskatchewan, Crystal worked in public libraries, in technical services and managerial positions, and for a library consortium. Her... Read More →
avatar for Hwee Ming Lim

Hwee Ming Lim

Librarian, Singapore Management University



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Stretching Your Dollars: Saving on Online Content
Quality databases can be expensive and only the most fortunate of libraries have unlimited, or even plentiful, financial resources. Knowing how to stretch increasingly tight library funds has become one of the more important aspects of a librarian's duties.

This interactive session will emphasize tools and strategies attendees can use to save valuable funds on databases and subscriptions. Creibaum and Bailey will lead discussions on topics including consortial and volume discounts, the advantages of taking a trial, the importance of keeping notes and checking invoices, and the fine art of negotiation. We will also have open dialogues about some of the rewards to be gained from working with vendors, including free product time and even access to free products.

Attendees will learn more about what they can do to reduce or limit their library's online content expenditures and will leave with concrete ideas about creative steps to take toward saving institutional acquisitions resources.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Bailey

Jeff Bailey

Library Director, Arkansas State University
A native of Dayton, Ohio, Jeff Bailey was appointed Director of the Dean B. Ellis Library of Arkansas State University in 2012 after leading the library for three years in an interim capacity. In his academic library career, Jeff has held positions in both public and technical services... Read More →
avatar for Linda Creibaum

Linda Creibaum

Acquisitions and Serials Librarian, Arkansas State University
Linda Creibaum is Acquisitions and Serials Librarian at Arkansas State University, where for the last 15 years she has been fascinated at the change in library resource formats and the nature of the “problems” she solves in her work day. Linda has worked in a variety of library... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Using User Research to Improve Site Redesigns

Creating a good user experience for our end users (students, researchers, etc.) is important to librarians, publishers, and other vendors in academic publishing; we want the content and products we provide to be used and useful. Site redesigns are a great opportunity to better address user needs because of all the information we have about how people are actually using a site, what people find confusing, and what goals aren't being accomplished.

This session will discuss user research in site redesigns and include case studies of using user research to better meet user needs. These will include the Indiana University Libraries' homepage redesign and the SAGE Research Methods redesign. Speakers will share:
 

  • The research undertaken and key findings, including a range of techniques for user research and applying user centered design principles 
  • The top challenges the teams were hoping to solve with the redesigns
  • The new design and how it responded to the challenges
  • After launch - What seems to have worked and not worked 


Attendees will leave the session with several examples of user research and ways to make their next redesign project more user-centered. Presenters will also share key outcomes from their research that are applicable across different sites and products.



Speakers
JC

Jennifer Cady

Resource Development Coordinator, University of La Verne
avatar for Courtney McDonald

Courtney McDonald

Learner Experience & Engagement Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder
AW

Adam White

Senior Product Manager, SAGE Publications



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Valuing Consortial Resources: A Framework for Assessment
Grounded assessment begins with establishing the goals of an institution and its users, but there is an added layer of complexity in determining value at the consortial level, where different institutions will naturally perceive the value of a particular resource differently. The shared resources of a consortium are also often diverse in both format and acquisition method. How should the relative value between e-books and streaming media be compared? Between leased and demand driven acquisitions? Between open access models and collaboratively owned models?

To answer these questions VIVA, the academic library consortium of Virginia, formed the Value Metric Task Force, charged with designing a framework for the coherent and holistic evaluation of shared resources. To ensure the development of metrics that were reflective of overarching consortial values, the task force, composed of representative members from each major type of VIVA institution, was asked to determine the highest collection priorities for the consortium and then translate these into quantifiable variables.

This session details the work of this group and the resulting flexible framework that employs weighted variables such as program levels, usage statistics, cost-per-use, and member feedback into straightforward, effective, value metrics. This framework enables a consistent approach to the evaluation of consortial resources, and empowers members to articulate the value of shared resources for Virginia students.

Speakers
BB

Beth Blanton-Kent

Collections Librarian, University of Virginia Library
avatar for Julie Kane

Julie Kane

Associate Professor and Head of Collection Services, Washington and Lee University
avatar for Madeline Kelly

Madeline Kelly

Head, Collection Development, George Mason University Libraries
Madeline Kelly is the Head of Collection Development at the George Mason University Libraries. She has experience in circulation, preservation, and collection development, and is most interested in finding practical ways to assess the quality and value of library collections. Before... Read More →
avatar for Genya O'Gara

Genya O'Gara

VIVA Deputy Director, George Mason University/VIVA
Genya O’Gara is the Associate Director of VIVA, the academic library consortium of Virginia, which represents 72 higher education institutions within the Commonwealth. She received her MSLS from UNC-Chapel Hill, and her BA from the Evergreen State College.
avatar for Anne Osterman

Anne Osterman

VIVA Director, George Mason University/VIVA
Anne Osterman is a librarian with over ten years of experience in academic libraries. She has worked in a variety of roles, including research data services, reference and instruction, acquisitions, and the licensing of electronic resources. She is currently Director of the Virtual... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Walled Gardens and Digital Playgrounds: Who's Playing in the World of Text and Data Mining?
The past several years has seen a flurry of scholarly communication regarding text and data mining (TDM) efforts, from case studies of library and vendor partnerships to statements of principle regarding model terms in library licenses. While much has been prognosticated about this seeming boom in activity, little data has been collected about the actual impact at the campus level over this period. This presentation will discuss results of a planned survey of academic libraries, building upon a survey conducted by Miller in 2015 and reported in her Master's thesis. The survey will explore the frequency of TDM requests from researchers, the ability of libraries to successfully accommodate these requests, and the impact these requests have upon service capacity. It will also explore how vendors are evolving their licensing models as the demand grows, and to what extent libraries are able to successfully negotiate model terms regarding TDM into vendor licenses. We hope the resulting data will provide a clearer picture of the current state of affairs, and help spur evidence-based solutions to allow this growing segment of library services to flourish.

Speakers
avatar for Marty Brennan

Marty Brennan

Schol. Comm. Education Librarian, FORCE11 Exec Board, FSCI Co-DIrector, UCLA
As a member of the FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI) Steering Committee, and co-chair of the FSCI Program Committee, I am very excited and proud to be a part of FSCI 2020 Online. I am also on the FORCE11 Executive Board, and the UCLA Library's principal liaison in our... Read More →
JC

Jennifer Chan

Scholarly Communication Librarian, UCLA Library
Jennifer is the Scholarly Communication Librarian at UCLA. She liaises with campus partners on the development of targeted outreach and programming that promote scholarly communication and open access, and develops open education strategies to further the campus mission of research... Read More →
RP

Roxanne Peck

Scholarly Communication and Licensing Librarian, UCLA


Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm EDT

Wind of Change: Scholarly Communications in the New Knowledge Economy
The ease of creating scientific research and the globalization of scholarly communications are creating a new knowledge economy. This new world economy influences technology trends and software development.  Stakeholders across the spectrum of research are engaging in an exchange of ideas and working out solutions, such as Open Science, reproducible research, data sharing/management, and research integrity.  Will these efforts amongst librarians, researchers, publishers, and other information providers solve the core problem of knowledge management? Can these stakeholders work together in the midst of digital overabundance and an ever expanding research ecosystem to help researchers create innovative research faster? 

Speakers
avatar for Gregg Gordon

Gregg Gordon

Managing Director, SSRN
avatar for Greg Tannanbaum

Greg Tannanbaum

Strategic Partnerships, Meta
Greg Tananbaum serves as a consultant to publishers, libraries, universities, and information providers as owner of ScholarNext (www.scholarnext.com). ScholarNext clients include Facebook, Microsoft, SPARC, Meta, and Annual Reviews.  He has been President of The Berkeley Electronic Press, as well as Director of Product Marketing for EndNote. Greg writes a regular column in Against the Grain covering emerging developments in the f... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm EDT

Wrangle Your Data like a Pro with the Data Processing Power of Python
Management, delivery, and marketing of library resources and collections necessitate interaction with a plethora of data from many sources and in many forms. Accessing and transforming data into meaningful information or different formats used in library automation can be time consuming, but a basic working knowledge of a programming language can improve efficiency in many facets of librarianship. It can be intimidating to get started with programming, but this is a session for beginners.

From processing Excel data to creating XML, from editing MARC records before upload to summarizing usage data in reports, Geoff and Jeremy have harnessed the Python programming language and third party Application Program Interfaces (APIs) to accomplish both behind the scenes and end user facing projects.

Creating programmatic solutions to problems requires an understanding of potential. This session has two main purposes: firstly, attendees will be introduced to the data sources, flows, and transformations used to accomplish existing projects at Mercer University and The College of Charleston. Foundational programming techniques will be explained and resources for learning Python will be shared; and secondly, attendees will be better able to communicate with library systems departments about data transformation needs and might just start the journey to becoming programmers themselves.

Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Brown

Jeremy Brown

Assistant Dean for Technical Services & Systems, Mercer University Library
GT

Geoff Timms

Librarian for Marine Resources, College of Charleston
Professional interests are information literacy of graduate students and the creation of web applications to enhance user experience of libraries and improve internal process efficiency. As Librarian for Marine Resources, I feel obliged to fish regularly.



Friday November 4, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm EDT
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401