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Tuesday, November 1
 

9:00am

Acquisitions Bootcamp
Registration Cost: $225 - Register on Main Conference Registration Page

Sponsored by ACSESS - Alliance of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Science Socieities


Offered as part of a joint project with UNC Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science. This seminar will offer an intensive boot camp on acquisitions from three different perspectives: public services, technical services, and the vendor side.  The major emphasis is on the nuts and bolts of the acquisitions process from selecting materials especially e-books and acquisitions workflows to assessing collections and articulating the return on investment to the parent organization (academic/special/public libraries).  Using an interactive hands-on approach, with case studies, small group discussion, and best practices attendees will gain pragmatic knowledge they can apply in their home institutions. This class is ideally suited for librarians new to selection and acquisitions workflows.

Topics:

  • Collection Management Overview

  • Budgeting

  • Assessing User Needs / Selecting Materials

  • Acquisitions Workflows

  • Negotiation Strategies & Legal Issues

  • Assessment of Collections

  • Print Materials / E-Resources

  • Marketing / Outreach


Speakers
avatar for Megan Kilb

Megan Kilb

E-Resources Librarian, UNC-Chapel Hill
Megan Kilb is the E-Resources Librarian in the University Library's E-Resources & Serials Management Department at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received a B.A. in History from Furman University and her M.S.L.S. from SILS at UNC-Chapel Hill. She's worked in e-resources acquisitions in one capacity or another since 2007.
avatar for Rebecca Vargha

Rebecca Vargha

Head, Information and Library Science Library, School of Information and Library Science, UNC Chapel Hill
Rebecca Vargha is Librarian, School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill since 2001. Her responsibilities as head of this library include collection development, staff supervision, liaison with departmental faculty and the central library, reference and research assistance, and facilities management. She is Faculty Advisor for the SLA Student Group at SILS, Chair-Elect of the Museums, ARts and... Read More →




Tuesday November 1, 2016 9:00am - 4:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

Data Visualization from Scratch
Registration Cost: $225 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

The importance of communicating library value is widely accepted and understood- data visualization is a particularly powerful tool for doing just that. Using data visualization offers an opportunity to empower librarians, their users, and their stakeholders. Visualization is a way to create dynamic, engaging, and intuitive interactive resources which can serve as tools for education and outreach.

Leverage data in your library by developing powerful visualizations based on your institution’s collection data. In this hands-on, day-long session, participants will apply visualization to their own usage and holdings data.

Attendees will learn techniques to examine, select and interpret datasets for visualization. The speakers will highlight and emphasize techniques for cleaning and organizing data for visualization.

After receiving orientation and training on visualization tools and applications, including Tableau and NodeXL, participants will have the opportunity to collaborate with the speakers and their peers to create their own visualizations for future use and the opportunity to begin building a collection dashboard for their institution.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Cronk

Lindsay Cronk

Coordinator of Online Resources and Collections, University of Houston
Collections person.



Tuesday November 1, 2016 9:00am - 4:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

Introduction to Data Curation
Registration Cost: $225- Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

Sponsored by Thomson Reuters

Offered as part of a joint project with UNC Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science. Libraries and archives are increasingly responsible for curation of digital data. This includes not only acquiring and managing data but also engagement with data creators and facilitating new forms of research through data use. This workshop will provide participants with an introduction to the primary opportunities, challenges, principles and strategies for addressing data curation within the context of libraries and archives. It will be an interactive event, include a combination of lecture, discussion and practical exercises.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Crabtree

Jonathan Crabtree

Assistant Director for Archives and Information Technology, Odum Institute for Research in Social Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Crabtree is Assistant Director for Cyberinfrastructure at the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at UNC Chapel Hill. The institute’s social science data archive is one of the oldest and most extensive in the country. As assistant director, Crabtree completely revamped the institute’s technology infrastructure and has positioned the institute to assume a leading national role in information archiving. His current efforts include... Read More →
avatar for Christopher (Cal) Lee

Christopher (Cal) Lee

Professor, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Christopher (Cal) Lee is Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He teaches archival administration; records management; digital curation; understanding information technology for managing digital collections; and digital forensics. He is a lead organizer and instructor for the DigCCurr Professional Institute, and he teaches professional workshops on digital forensics methods... Read More →



Tuesday November 1, 2016 9:00am - 4:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

1:00pm

Understanding the Library Market
Registration Cost: $140 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page
Sponsored by MPS Limited

Attention publishers and vendors of library-related materials, we have a workshop just for you! We’ll discuss how to target libraries that will buy your publications, making your marketing budget effective, improving your understanding of the library market, and using library associations to focus your spending. Learn from veterans in the field how libraries buy, who are the library buyers, and how purchasing decisions are made. You can’t afford to miss out on this workshop focused on the library market at the premier international annual library conference focused on book, serial, and electronic resource acquisition. All the major decision makers will be there, and so should you!

Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Basch Associates
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member of publishing and finance committees.
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

President, Gruenberg Consulting
MICHAEL GRUENBERG is president of Gruenberg Consulting LLP, which provides services in the areas of sales force training and assessment, organizational reviews, executive coaching, event planning, market/product evaluation, and negotiation skills. He has more than 30 years of experience as a senior sales executive in the information industry. His new book, “Buying and Selling Information: A Guide for Information Professionals and Salespeople to... Read More →



Tuesday November 1, 2016 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403
 
Wednesday, November 2
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.


The desk will be open the following hours:

  • Wednesday, 11/2, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
  • Thursday, 11/3, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
  • Friday, 11/4, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
  • Saturday, 11/5: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Wednesday November 2, 2016 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

8:00am

Predators, “Pirates” and Privacy: Educating Researchers on New Challenges in Publishing
Registration Cost: $140 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

Offered in collaboration with the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP).

From the journals on Beall’s List to the controversy surrounding articles on sites such as SciHub, scholarly communication faces continuing challenges from a new set of players. Today’s researchers must publish to ensure their promotion and tenure, but the increasingly complex publishing space now leaves them in need of a new and different level of support. Librarians are in an ideal position to educate faculty and researchers about the information industry conversations taking place around predatory publishing practices,  “piracy,” and privacy, and how even seemingly innocuous actions (such as sharing a username and password)  can have negative implications for themselves and their universities.  As publishers look to new data privacy and authentication measures to protect user data and secure content, these trends will certainly affect their customers and ease of use for end-users.

Come learn about the multitude of ways that predatory publishers attempt to manipulate authors through fake journals, fictitious editorial boards, lack of peer review, and spurious article processing charges. Learn from publishers and library services professionals about the challenges of authentication and privacy along with new ways to ensure the integrity of scholarly communications. Starting with panel sessions and then moving to a roundtable discussion format, this practical session will provide you with concrete takeaways that you can use to educate and protect your patrons, along with information on what’s coming in terms of data and content protection.

As a CAE Approved Provider educational program related to the CAE exam content outline, this program may be applied for 4  credits toward your CAE application or renewal professional development requirements.

Moderators
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Publisher and Content Strategy, ProQuest SIPX
I'm passionate about online learning, publisher and library technology, and wearables!

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for David Crotty

David Crotty

Editorial Director, Journals Policy, Oxford University Press
David Crotty is the Editorial Director, Journals Policy for Oxford University Press. He oversees journal policy and contributes to strategy across OUP’s journals program, drives technological innovation, serves as an information officer, and manages a suite of research society-owned journals. David was previously an Executive Editor with Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, creating and editing new science books and journals, and was the Editor... Read More →
avatar for Craig Griffin

Craig Griffin

Solutions Engineer, Silverchair Information Systems
avatar for Regina Reynolds

Regina Reynolds

Director, U.S. ISSN Center; Head, ISSN Section, Library of Congress
Regina Romano Reynolds is director of the U.S. ISSN Center and head of the ISSN Section at the Library of Congress. She was a member of the U.S. RDA Test Coordinating Committee and co-chaired the internal LC group that recommended LC projects based on the report of the Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control. Reynolds is a member of the CONSER BIBFRAME working group, and member of the ISSN Review Group, an international effort... Read More →
TT

Todd Toler

VP Digital Project Management, Wiley
avatar for Ken Varnum

Ken Varnum

Senior Program Manager, University of Michigan Library
I am the Senior Program Manager at the University of Michigan Library. In this role, I am responsible for three programs: the library's discovery interfaces (the "MLibrary" single search tool, ArticlesPlus, Search Tools, etc.), delivery interfaces, and the library's evolving and emerging analytics infrastructure.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 8:00am - 12:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

E-Resources Management
Registration Cost: $125 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

Libraries and librarians are being pressured to work smarter and more efficiently. How does one manage the library’s resources when we are adding new faculty, new courses, increasing numbers of students, users are shifting to e-resources, and we are told cut our materials budget? What are other institutions and publishers doing to help you?

Upgrade your experience by learning some approaches from a panel of three publishers and four librarians, and by sharing your experiences at this interactive session. We will focus on set up, access, technology, delivery, and organizational constraints. What works and what doesn’t work?

Moderators
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Basch Associates
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member of publishing and finance committees.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Bulock

Chris Bulock

Electronic Resources Librarian, California State University Northridge
Chris has been an Electronic Resources Librarian since 2009, and just moved back to Los Angeles after working at Southern Illinois State University Edwardsville for 5 years. He has written and presented on perpetual access, Open Access, and usage analysis.
TG

Tejs Grevstad

Co-Founder, ConsortiaManager
avatar for Chuck Hamaker

Chuck Hamaker

Professor, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Charles Hammer

Charles Hammer

Director of Digital Planning & Strategy, Wiley
Charles Hammer manages a team of product managers in Wiley’s Research business who focus on improving Wiley products to meet the needs of academic and corporate librarians.
avatar for Virginia Martin

Virginia Martin

Electronic Resources Acquisitions Coordinator, Duke University Libraries
Virginia Martin is Electronic Resources Acquisitions Coordinator at Duke University Libraries. Previously, she held positions as Electronic Resources Access & Discovery Librarian and Head of Electronic & Continuing Resources Acquisitions at Joyner Library, East Carolina University.
avatar for Kasia Stasik

Kasia Stasik

Regional Sales Manager, HARRASSOWITZ
Kasia serves as Regional Sales Manager for HARRASSOWITZ covering Western Part of North America. She has been working with the company for nine years. Prior to joining HARRASSOWITZ between 1994 and 2007 she worked in various academic and research libraries overseeing areas of serials, e-resources, standing orders and approval plans. She enjoys hands on approach to customer service and bountiful learning possibilities her job affords her.
avatar for Dan Tonkery

Dan Tonkery

CEO, Content Strategy



Wednesday November 2, 2016 9:00am - 12:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

9:00am

Exclusively Serials: The Art, the Business and Best Practices
Registration Cost: $125 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

This program will focus on the world of serials – magazines and journals, print and electronic, individual titles and packages. This program will offer content for the novice to the expert serials professional as well as publishers and vendors.

The first half of the session will feature a panel of acquisition and collection development librarians who will share their insights on the library facing aspects of collection development and collection management from selection to renewals, format changes and to ultimately in some cases, non-renewal.

The second half of the session will address the external facing business aspects of serials purchasing. Topics will include how serials vendors are compensated, service charge is calculated and points to consider when issuing a bid, RFI or RFP. Service agreements and contracts and suggestions for a successful library vendor relationship will be addressed.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Bosch

Stephen Bosch

Budget and Licensing, University of Arizona
Stephen Bosch has been involved with various aspects of acquisitions, collection development and library administrative services during his 35 year tenure at the University of Arizona. He has held positions as Acquisitions Librarian and Coordinator for Collection Development, Information Access Librarian, Financial and Administrative Services Librarian as well as his current position. Nationally, he has been chair of many ALA committees, and has... Read More →
avatar for Justin Clarke

Justin Clarke

Regional Sale Manager, HARRASSOWITZ
Justin Clarke is the Product Manager and Regional Sales Manager East at HARRASSOWITZ Booksellers and Subscription Agents, where he has worked for the past 11 years.  Prior to joining HARRASSOWITZ, Justin worked in Technical Services at Swarthmore College Library and was the SFX administrator for the TriCollege Consortium.  He also worked in Collection Development at Temple University where he set up his first approval plan with... Read More →
avatar for Tina Feick

Tina Feick

Director Sales and Marketing, North America, HARRASSOWITZ
Tina held serials librarian positions at the Free Library of Philadelphia and Princeton University. After 10 years, she joined Blackwell's Periodicals Division (Oxford, UK) as the first "Serials Specialist". She is presently Director of Sales and Marketing, North America for Harrassowitz. As a founding member and former President of NASIG, Tina received the first NASIG Champion Award. From ALCTS, Tina was awarded the Ulrich's Serials Librarian... Read More →
avatar for Kittie Henderson

Kittie Henderson

Vice President and Chief Librarian, EBSCO Information Services
Kittie Henderson is Vice President and Chief Librarian of the Subscription Division of EBSCO Information Services.  Since she joined EBSCO in 1992, Kittie has worked with librarians and EBSCO staff to expand services to all types of libraries.  Kittie has been one of the co-authors of the annual Library Journal Serials Pricing article since 2010 and holds an MLS from the University of Alabama.
avatar for Jesse Holden

Jesse Holden

Account Services Manager, EBSCO Information Services
Jesse is the former Head of Acquisitions at the University of Southern California. He is an instructor for the online ALCTS course "Fundamentals of Electronic Resource Acquisitons." The second edition of his book, "Acquisitions: Core Competencies and Practices" was published in September by ALA-Neal Schuman.
GS

Gracemary Smulewitz

Head, Distributed Technical Services, Rutgers University Libraries


Wednesday November 2, 2016 9:00am - 12:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am

Legal Issues in Libraries
Registration Cost: $225 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

Librarians are faced with legal issues every day but, without knowing what to look for, it can be easy to miss or misunderstand them.  Conventional wisdom that offers easy answers can be tempting but may provide a false sense of security.  Even worse, by trying to follow rules we don’t really understand, we may unnecessarily impede the library’s ability to do good work.  Through a series of discussions and group activities, this day-long session will prepare librarians to make informed, thoughtful decisions in key legal areas that are becoming ever more crucial in institutional settings, including:

  1. Information Ownership and Mission.  Who owns instruction-centered materials (syllabi, online courses, student notes, etc.)?  What is the statutory baseline behind licenses?  How do institutional policies come into play?  What about intellectual property beyond (c) – patent, trademark, and tech transfer?  How should we think about what we have vs. what we own – repositories, research data, and meeting funder mandates?

  2. Security, Equal Treatment, and Liability in Libraries.   What are emerging legal standards for safety and freedom from harassment?  What is our employment liability?

  3. Privacy and Disclosure:  How can we come to a better understanding of FERPA, HIPAA, and other regulations?  What’s happening in the areas of confidentiality and data security?  What can libraries do to protect user privacy for library materials? How can libraries help users understand privacy rights and risks?

  4. Accessibility, Lawsuits, and VPATs.  Given ADA, OSHA, and disability requirements, how can we make physical spaces accessible?  How should we think about accessibility for websites and other online services?

  5. Horizon Issues and Uncharted Waters. What is on the horizon with makerspaces, data visualization, digital humanities, and other innovations?  How do you navigate and keep up with new guidelines, best practices, documents, and cases?  What are effective strategies for risk management?

The session will conclude with a summary of issues that will need further follow-up with professionals, and discussion of how that follow-up may be better achieved. 

Moderators
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor to CRL, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian for Collections & International Programs at Yale University; prior to that she worked in the commercial sector, and also for 5 years as Senior Program Officer for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Macklin

Lisa Macklin

Director, Scholarly Communications Office, Emory University
Lisa A. Macklin is the director of the Scholarly Communications Office for Emory University Libraries. As both a librarian and a lawyer, Lisa focuses on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues, working with faculty and students on the application of copyright law to teaching, research, and scholarship. Her interests include transformations in scholarship and publishing, including new models of scholarship in digital form and... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 9:00am - 4:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:30am

General History Walking Tour
Reservations Required; $20 per person

This tour gives a general overview of Charleston’s history from the colonial era onward – through the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, to the city’s rediscovery and revitalization of the past 40 years. Participants will gain insight into Charleston’s early wealth and culture, viewing the city’s impressive public buildings and private mansions. Visitors will learn of architectural influences and other factors that resulted in modifications to original structures, with explanation of the single house, the double house and dependencies. (2 hour tour, coveres about a mile in distance)

Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides for the tours. All tours are $20 per person and payment may be made in cash or check at tour time.  Reservations for all tours may be made at broadstreettours.com.  Tours must have a minimum of 6 people to go.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 9:30am - 11:30am
Washington Park 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:30am

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by The New York Times

Join us for a refreshment break to celebrate the opening of the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the entire Showcase at the Francis Marion Hotel, and will be provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

10:30am

Charleston Vendor Showcase
Don't miss Charleston's only day of exhibits. Browse the latest products and services, talk with reps, see demos, and snag cool freebies. We can't wait to see you there! Booths will be throughout the Mezzanine Level in the Carolina Ballroom, pre-function areas outside the ballroom, the Calhoun Room, the Pinckney Room, and on the second floor in the Gold Ballroom.

2016 Vendor Showcase Guide Book

List of Vendors by Booth Number

Floor Map

Participating companies:


  • 1science

  • AAAS / Science

  • Accessible Archives Inc.

  • ACI Information Group, LLC

  • ACLS Humanities E-Book

  • ACM (Association for Computing Machinery)

  • ACS Publications

  • ACSESS, Alliance of Crop Soil, and Environmental Science Societies

  • Action! Library Media Service

  • Adam Matthew Digital

  • AIP Publishing

  • Alexander Street, a ProQuest Company

  • Allen Press, Inc.

  • Ambrose Video Publishing

  • American Economic Association

  • American Psychological Association (APA)

  • American Society for Microbiology

  • Annual Reviews

  • Apex CoVantage

  • Artstor

  • ASTM International

  • Basch Subscriptions, Inc.

  • Begell House, Inc. Publishers

  • Bentham Science Publishers

  • Berrett-Koehler Publishers

  • Better World Books

  • Bevara Technologies

  • BioOne / Publishers Communication Group

  • Bioscientifica Ltd

  • Bloomsbury Publishing

  • BMJ

  • Boopsie

  • Brepols Publishers

  • Brill

  • Bureau Van Dijk

  • Business Expert Press and Momentum Press

  • Cairn.info

  • Cambridge University Press

  • Casalini Libri S.p.A.

  • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

  • Columbia University Press

  • Copyright Clearance Center

  • CRC Press

  • Credo Reference Inc.

  • Data-Planet by Conquest Systems, Inc.

  • De Gruyter

  • Digital Science

  • DLSG at Image Access

  • Docuseek, LLC.

  • Duke University Press

  • E-ImageData Corp.

  • East View Information Services

  • EBSCO Information Services

  • EcoAmericas

  • Edward Elgar Publishing Inc.

  • Elsevier

  • Emerald Group Publishing

  • Euromonitor International

  • Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company

  • Film Platform

  • Gale, A Cengage Company

  • GeoScienceWorld

  • GIDEON Informatics Inc.

  • Harrassowitz

  • HTC Global Services Inc.

  • IGI Global

  • Infobase Learning

  • Ingenta

  • Innovative

  • Intelecom Learning

  • InteLex Corporation

  • International Monetary Fund

  • IOP Publishing

  • JoVE - Journal of Visualized Experiments

  • JSTOR

  • Kanopy

  • LM Information Delivery

  • LYRASIS

  • Mango Languages

  • Mark Allen Group

  • Matthews Medical & Scientific Books, Inc.

  • McGraw-Hill Education

  • Mergent, Inc.

  • Meteo Inc. / Geological Society of London

  • Midwest Library Service

  • Modern Language Association (MLA)

  • Morgan Claypool Publishers

  • OCLC

  • Oxford University Press

  • Paratext

  • Penn State University Press

  • PolicyMap LLC

  • Project MUSE

  • ProQuest

  • Publisher Solutions International Ltd

  • RAND State Statistics

  • Readex (Newsbank Inc.)

  • RedLink

  • ReferenceUSA (contract came in as Infogroup)

  • RefME

  • Reprints Desk

  • Rittenhouse Book Distributors

  • Rockefeller University Press

  • Routledge Books

  • Royal Society / ICE Publishing

  • S&P Global Market Intelligence

  • Sabinet

  • SAE International

  • SAGE Publishing

  • SirsiDynix

  • Society of Exploration Geophysicists

  • SPIE Digital Library

  • Springer Nature

  • STAT!Ref

  • Swank Digital Campus

  • Taylor & Francis Group

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education

  • The Institution of Engineering and Technology

  • The JAMA Network  (Am Medical Assoc (AMA)

  • The MediaPreserve

  • The MIT Press

  • The New York Times

  • Thieme Medical Publishers

  • Thomson Reuters

  • TIND Technologies

  • University of Chicago Press

  • University of Virginia Press

  • Wiley

  • Wolters Kluwer

  • World Scientific Publishing Company

  • WT Cox Information Services

  • YBP Library Services (now owned by EBSCO)

  • Yewno, Inc.


 

Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 6:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:00am

Vendor Showcase Prize Drawings
Enter for a Chance to Win!

To thank you for visiting our exhibitors at the Charleston Vendor Showcase, we're hosting a prize drawing every hour from 11:00 am - 4:00 pm in various locations throughout the exhibits. Drop your business card in the entry box - look for the balloons! Winners will be called out over the loudspeakers at the times and locations listed below. You must be present to win!

  • 11:00 AM - Prefunction Area A (Outside the Carolina Ballroom, around the corner from the elevators) 
  • 12:00 PM - Calhoun Room
  • 1:00 PM - Prefunction Area B (Outside the opposite end of the Carolina Ballroom, around the corner from the Calhoun Room)
  • 2:00 PM - Gold Ballroom (2nd Floor)
  • 3:00 PM - Carolina Ballroom
  • 4:00 PM - Pinckney Room
Map of the Vendor Showcase

Wednesday November 2, 2016 11:00am - 4:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:00pm

Vendor Showcase Lunch
Lunch is provided for all preconference attendees and Conference registrants on the showcase floor. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the exhibits in the Francis Marion Hotel.

Wednesday November 2, 2016 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

1:00pm

Alternative Careers for Librarians
Registration Cost: $125 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

The library profession is changing quickly. Alternative Jobs for Librarians is a workshop aimed at mid-career librarians who would like to renew their careers within librarianship, but also those who would like to seek new challenges in other domains. The speakers will be people with relevant experience whose example and guidance can help the participants to accomplish their career goals.

This workshop is meant to benefit those librarians interested in career changes and will include a panel of librarians, vendors, and publishers whose perspectives and experiences will supply practical advice on career changes.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Heinze

Jill Heinze

Director, User Experience, University of Virginia
Jill is the Director of User Experience at UVA Library where she manages a team of web developers and user researchers to nurture positive user relationships in both physical and virtual environments. She began her library career as the Undergraduate Services Coordinator at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). While there, she became an invited speaker and writer on the topic of library marketing, earning recognition as a Library Journal Mover... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Ismail

Matthew Ismail

Director of Collection Development, Central Michigan University
Matthew is currently Director of Collection Development at Central Michigan University. He worked at the American University in Sharjah, in the United Arab Emirates, from 1999 to 2006 and at the American University in Cairo, in Cairo, Egypt, from 2006 to 2011. Matthew is on the Editorial Board of Charleston Insights in Library, Archival, and Information Sciences, and is working with Katina Strauch and Tom Gilson on another publishing project... Read More →
avatar for Elisabeth Leonard

Elisabeth Leonard

Senior Field Editor, SAGE Publications


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

1:00pm

Exploring New Roles of Academic Libraries in a Changing Knowledge Landscape
Registration Cost: $125 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

This workshop explores the future roles of academic libraries, and what new library technologies might be needed to support them. The workshop is based on the insights gathered through the Collaboration between Index Data, EBSCO, and the Kuali-OLE libraries to build a new Open Source Library Service Platform (LSP). The project is very much conceived as an engine of change in the industry, and a means of facilitating conversations and collaboration around new kinds of library services.

During the workshop, several key members of the Collaboration will present an overview of key findings to date, and engage participants in a structured exchange of ideas around central themes which have been identified so far. This includes (but is not limited to) supporting knowledge productivity, ensuring an integrated delivery experience, engaging in shared efforts across libraries and not the least exploring new business models.

This workshop is not designed to be a sales pitch for any open source software or for the specific platform, but an earnest desire to engage in conversation around these themes and topics. This is a great chance to participate in a strategic and open minded conversation that can help shape the future of academic libraries.

The strategic workshop will be highly interactive. Participation will therefore be limited to 30 people.

Speakers
SH

Sebastian Hammer

President, Index Data
avatar for Michael Winkler

Michael Winkler

Managing Director OLE (Open Library Environment), OLE


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm

Negotiating with Vendors
Registration Cost: $125 - Register on the Main Conference Registration Page

The introduction of digital content created a new link in the information chain: the license. Almost every librarian responsible for arranging electronic access to information has had to review or negotiate not just prices but contractual terms, adding hours — sometimes frustrating hours at that — to the process of buying materials. But few have legal training, and most non-sales people haven’t spent a lot of time thinking about what underpins successful negotiations.

Negotiating with Vendors brings together librarians and vendors to help you prepare for these discussions. You’ll come away with a better understanding of what is involved in negotiating, why licenses matter, and how to use them to safeguard your rights and ensure that both party’s obligations are made clear. Some of the dizzying legalese will come into focus, and armed with fresh insights you’ll be able to approach license discussions with less anxiety and doubt.

Moderators
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Basch Associates
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member of publishing and finance committees.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

AIP Publishing
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

President, Gruenberg Consulting
MICHAEL GRUENBERG is president of Gruenberg Consulting LLP, which provides services in the areas of sales force training and assessment, organizational reviews, executive coaching, event planning, market/product evaluation, and negotiation skills. He has more than 30 years of experience as a senior sales executive in the information industry. His new book, “Buying and Selling Information: A Guide for Information Professionals and Salespeople to... Read More →
avatar for Chuck Hamaker

Chuck Hamaker

Professor, UNC Charlotte
avatar for Marjorie M. K.Hlava

Marjorie M. K.Hlava

President and Chairperson, Access Innovations, Inc.
Marjorie M.K. Hlava is President, Chairman, and founder of Access Innovations, Inc. Very well known in the international information arena, she is the founding Chair of the new SLA Taxonomy Division established in August 2009. She is past president of NFAIS (2002-2003), the organization of those who create, organize, and distribute information. Ms. Hlava is past president of the American Society for Information Science and Technology - 1993... Read More →
avatar for John Lavender

John Lavender

Consultant, Lavender Consulting/Maverick Publishing Specialists
Lavender-Consulting is run by John Lavender, a publisher with almost 40 years' experience in academic and scientific publishing. John has worked with books, databases and journals, and in editorial, sales, marketing, electronic content and delivery, business development and in negotiating. John is also a Senior Associate with Maverick Publishing Specialists who provide strategic consulting and operational outsource services for the publishing... Read More →
WS

Ward Shaw

Independent Investor
Ward Shaw is a private investor and frequent contributor within the scholarly information community. Previously, he founded and owned the CARL Corporation and UnCover Inc., and served as Chairman and CEO of those companies. He was Executive Director of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Associate Director of Libraries at the University of Denver, and at Colby College. He holds degrees from Hamilton College, Simmons College, and an... Read More →
avatar for Bruce Strauch

Bruce Strauch

Professor of Business Law, The Citadel
Bruce Strauch, J.D. is a Professor of Business Law and Director of the Citadel Mentors Program. He holds degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill and Oxford, is extensively published in the field of copyright and trademark, is the author of nine novels and the publisher of a trade journal of the scholarly publishing industry. His wife Katina is the founder of the Charleston Conference and Assistant Dean for Technical Services and Collection Development at... Read More →
avatar for Dan Tonkery

Dan Tonkery

CEO, Content Strategy



Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:00pm

City Market Area Culinary Tour
Registration Required; Cost: $60

This 2 1/2 hour tour explores Charleston’s Old and Historic District, offering the best of Charleston’s history and food! Showcasing some of Charleston’s traditional favorites, as well as recent innovations, this tour highlights the cuisine of our favorite locally owned and operated restaurants in the Holy City! It is a journey that is informative, delicious and fun!

The Charleston Culinary Tour visits 3-4 different restaurants and combines elements of a historical tour with a culinaryadventure! The food on your tour will provide a broad range of samples which will provide insight into Lowcountry cuisine.

TOUR INCLUDES
:

  • All food and non-alcoholic beverage tastings

  • Enough food to make a meal for most


PLEASE REMEMBER:

  • Tours are held rain or shine

  • These are walking tours, and historic Charleston has a number of very uneven cobblestone streets and sidewalks. Please wear comfortable shoes and clothing

  • Each tour is unique as destinations rotate according to restaurant availability.





Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA

2:30pm

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by the Charleston Information Group, LLC

Join us for a refreshment break during the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be scattered throughout the Showcase and provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:00pm

Upper King Street Area Culinary Tour
Registration Required; Cost: $60

This 2 1/2 hour tour explores Charleston’s Old and Historic District, offering the best of Charleston’s history and food! Showcasing some of Charleston’s traditional favorites, as well as recent innovations, this tour highlights the cuisine of our favorite locally owned and operated restaurants in the Holy City! It is a journey that is informative, delicious and fun!

The Charleston Culinary Tour visits 3-4 different restaurants and combines elements of a historical tour with a culinaryadventure! The food on your tour will provide a broad range of samples which will provide insight into Lowcountry cuisine.

TOUR INCLUDES:

  • All food and non-alcoholic beverage tastings

  • Enough food to make a meal for most



PLEASE REMEMBER
:

  • Tours are held rain or shine

  • These are walking tours, and historic Charleston has a number of very uneven cobblestone streets and sidewalks. Please wear comfortable shoes and clothing

  • Each tour is unique as destinations rotate according to restaurant availability.





Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:00pm - 5:30pm
TBA

4:00pm

Vendor Showcase Reception
Visit the Showcase before it closes and enjoy wine, cheese, and fruit at the reception. The bars will be located inside the Carolina Ballroom and Gold Ballroom, but tables with food will be placed in various locations on the Showcase floor.

Wednesday November 2, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

4:00pm

Lady Lore Walking Tour
Reservations Required; $20 per person

Meet Septima Poinsette Clark, Cleclia Peronneau McGowan, Eliza Lucas Pinckney, Susan Pringle Frost, Theodosia Burr Alston, Elizabeth O’Neill Verner, Alicia Rhett, Anne Bonny, Mary Boykin Chestnut, Rebecca Brewton Motte, Amarinthia Snowden Yates, and the Pollitzer sisters. This group of courageous innovative women includes civil rights activists, social reformers, preservationists, suffragettes, a historical diarist, an artist, a planter, an actress, a pirate and a mystery. In changing their world of feminine stereotypes, they opened doors and provided important opportunities for women that followed. (2 hour tour, covering about a mile)

Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides for the tours. All tours are $20 per person and payment may be made in cash or check at tour time.  Reservations for all tours may be made at broadstreettours.com.  Tours must have a minimum of 6 people to go.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Washington Park 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC 29401

5:00pm

Juried Product Development Forums
Advanced Registration Required: Invitations will be emailed to all librarian attendees. If you do not receive your invitation, please contact Caroline Goldsmith (caroline@charlestonlibraryconference.com).

The Forums are focus groups designed for publishers and vendors to gather market input from librarians on the development of a particular product or service, and for librarians to discuss market issues with publishers and vendors invited to participate in a forum.The Forum sessions for librarians are intended for library staff and will be closed to other publishers and vendors. Invitations will be sent to registered library workers by email, and there will be a staffed sign-up table at the Conference for attendees to register on-site. In addition, publishers & vendors may invite their customers to sign up for this event. Distributors, consultants or individuals from other companies will be admitted if the participating publisher or vendor has added their name to the list of attendees for their session.Publishers and vendors have a unique opportunity for feedback from librarians regarding the design, features, feasibility or pricing of a particular product or service that addresses internal debates and shortens the sales cycle.

Wednesday November 2, 2016 5:00pm - 6:15pm
TBA

5:30pm

Mixology Tour
Registration Required; Cost $30

Think of this tour as a mobile cocktail party in beautiful Charleston!  This 1 1/2 hour tour introduces you to some of Charleston’s best Mixologists! Each Mixology Tour stops at three watering holes where guests will meet the magicians behind the bars that are mixing Charleston’s most exciting, innovative and delicious drinks. After discussing the art and craft of mixing cocktails and gaining insight into how Charleston’s mixologists are embracing traditional techniques and are taking ingredients from farm to tumbler, tour participants will have an opportunity to sample a specialty craft cocktail at each of the three stops! While walking between stops, your guide will provide insight into Charleston’s cocktail culture, both past and present.

TOUR INCLUDES:

  • One specialty craft cocktail at each of the tour’s three stops.

  • An opportunity to meet and interact with mixologists.

  • A narrated tour by a licensed tour guide between stops.



PLEASE REMEMBER:

  • Tours are held rain or shine

  • These are walking tours, and historic Charleston has a number of very uneven cobblestone streets and sidewalks. Please wear comfortable shoes and clothing.



Wednesday November 2, 2016 5:30pm - 6:30pm
TBA

7:30pm

Ghostly Stroll Walking Tour
Reservations Required; $20 per person

Charleston is believed to be a most haunted place. The city has experienced numerous natural and manmade disasters in its long history; stories and legends of great fear, suffering, and death abound. The historic district with hundreds of old buildings provides familiar settings for spirits to revisit and haunt. Charleston, called the “Holy City”, is known for its beautiful historic churches – whose graveyards hold many secrets and horrors. Beguiling tales will take you back to a time when life was tenuous, survival uncertain. Come hear legends from the past and take in the beautiful ambiance of Charleston at night. (1 1/2 hour tour)

Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides for the tours. All tours are $20 per person and payment may be made in cash or check at tour time.  Reservations for all tours may be made at broadstreettours.com.  Tours must have a minimum of 6 people to go.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Library Society 64 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Thursday, November 3
 

6:30am

'Move a Little, Drink a Latte' 5K Fun Run
Brought to you by BiblioBoard.

Join your fellow intrepid conference-goers for an early morning jaunt around some familiar Charleston haunts— 5k, run or walk, go the whole distance or just meet for an early coffee — it’s just a loosely organized chance to get a little fresh air and fresh coffee to complement the conference’s fresh content. See map at link below.

 


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:30am - 7:30am
Marion Square Park

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

 The desk will be open the following hours:

  • Wednesday, 11/2, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
  • Thursday, 11/3, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
  • Friday, 11/4, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
  • Saturday, 11/5: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Thursday November 3, 2016 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

Thursday November 3, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

8:30am

Welcome and Opening Remarks
Thursday November 3, 2016 8:30am - 8:35am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

8:35am

You Can’t Preserve What You Don’t Have – Or Can You? Libraries as Infrastructure for Perpetual Access to Intellectual Output.
Since their existence, libraries have been responsible for preserving society’s records and intellectual output. This ancient and important role is under serious threat in the digital age. Even for scholarly journals, the issue of perpetual access has not been solved, other than by libraries buying access to archival materials. Recently, it became clear that the open access business model, with a focus on free access to new publications, introduces new problems for the archival role of libraries.

So if ownership is crucial for preservation, who will ensure future generations have access to scholarly journal content of past times? Who are the actors in this new environment and what opportunities can be identified to address this important issue?

Moderators
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor to CRL, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian for Collections & International Programs at Yale University; prior to that she worked in the commercial sector, and also for 5 years as Senior Program Officer for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Anja Smit

Anja Smit

University Librarian, Utrecht University
After an international career of over 20 years in library management and library automation, I joined Utrecht University in 2010. Previously, I have served as a university librarian at two other Dutch Universities (Nijmegen and Maastricht) and spent 3 years in the US. As an Executive Consultant for Nelinet (now merged in Lyrasis) I helped libraries on strategic and tactical planning, human resource management, facilities renovation, and other... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 8:35am - 9:15am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:15am

Libraries as Convener, Enabler, Distributor, Advocate, and Archive in the Future Knowledge Economy
By 2026, there will be no information and services industry targeting products to the library marketplace. Content and applications will be directed to the consumer. Open resources for learning, research and recreation, and open source tools supporting innovation, and individual and organizational productivity, will be more prevalant in the global economy. Self-publishing and niche technology development will dominate. Information policy wars will dictate national and global legal and legislative debates. Libraries will be effectively integrated into the new creative environments.

Moderators
avatar for Anthony  Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
Anthony Watkinson is the Principal Consultant at CIBER Research and is an associate of Oxford Brookes University and an honorary lecturer at University College London. For publications see the Ciber site. He is a director of the Charleston Conference, a member of the editorial board of the Charleston Advisor and co-organiser of the Fiesole Retreats. He also consults for the Publishers Association and organises events and writes for the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for James G. Neal

James G. Neal

University Librarian Emeritus, Columbia University
Jim Neal is University Librarian Emeritus at Columbia. He served as the Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian at Columbia University during 2001-2014, providing leadership for university academic computing and a system of twenty-two libraries. His responsibilities included the Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning, the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, the Copyright Advisory Office, and the... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:15am - 10:00am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:30am

Doin' the Charleston Walking Tour
Reservations Required; $20 per person

In the early 1900s, Charleston experienced a renaissance fueled by artists, writers, musicians, poets, and preservationists. Alice Ravenel Huger Smith, Elizabeth O’Neill Verner, and Alfred Hutty created lovely intimate scenes of the old city to sell to tourists. Charleston’s Poetry Society, one of the first of its kind, was formed in 1920. Dubose Heyward collaborated with George Gershwin to transform his novel Porgy into the opera “Porgy and Bess”. Jenkins Orphanage jazz bands played in the streets of Charleston, then New York and London. The arts brought much needed attention to the rather beleaguered city and lent support to the budding preservationist movement in Charleston. (2 hour tour, covering about a mile)

Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides for the tours. All tours are $20 per person and payment may be made in cash or check at tour time.  Reservations for all tours may be made at broadstreettours.com.  Tours must have a minimum of 6 people to go.


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:30am - 11:30am
Washington Park 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:00am

Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Scholarship Presentation
Cynthia Graham Hurd was a librarian for over 31 years in Charleston public and academic libraries.  She worked as the branch manager of the popular St. Andrews Regional Library, and as a part-time reference librarian at the College of Charleston. On June 17, 2015, her life ended when a lone gunman entered the historic Emanuel AME Church and killed nine people during a prayer meeting. Cynthia is remembered as a “tireless servant of the community who spent her life helping residents, making sure they had every opportunity for an education and personal growth.” 

Springer Nature is proud to honor the legacy of Cynthia Graham Hurd by awarding a scholarship to a librarian who has demonstrated an active interest in the profession, but has not had an opportunity to attend the Charleston Library Conference due to lack of institutional funding.

Moderators
avatar for Anthony  Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
Anthony Watkinson is the Principal Consultant at CIBER Research and is an associate of Oxford Brookes University and an honorary lecturer at University College London. For publications see the Ciber site. He is a director of the Charleston Conference, a member of the editorial board of the Charleston Advisor and co-organiser of the Fiesole Retreats. He also consults for the Publishers Association and organises events and writes for the... Read More →

Thursday November 3, 2016 10:00am - 10:10am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:10am

Refreshment Break


Thursday November 3, 2016 10:10am - 10:30am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:30am

Building the Knowledge School
The rise of the information school movement has been seen as both a positive and negative reality in the preparation of librarians. Have undergraduate programs taken away resources and attention from the masters in library science? Has the growth of faculty with little or no understanding of libraries diluted the field? Lankes will lay out his thoughts for moving past the arguments to defining a knowledge school. A school focused on impact in communities and built upon the values of librarians, but serving the needs of a broader information infrastructure.

Moderators
avatar for Anthony  Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
Anthony Watkinson is the Principal Consultant at CIBER Research and is an associate of Oxford Brookes University and an honorary lecturer at University College London. For publications see the Ciber site. He is a director of the Charleston Conference, a member of the editorial board of the Charleston Advisor and co-organiser of the Fiesole Retreats. He also consults for the Publishers Association and organises events and writes for the... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr David Lankes

Dr David Lankes

Director, School of Library & Information Science, University of South Carolina
R. David Lankes is the director of the University of South Carolina’s School of Library & Information Science and the 2016-2017 Follett Chair at Dominican University’s Graduate School of Library and Information Science. Lankes has always been interested in combining theory and practice to create active research projects that make a difference. His work has been funded by organizations such as The MacArthur Foundation, The... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 10:30am - 11:15am
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:30am

Rolling with the Punches... and Punching Back: The Millennial Librarian’s Approach to Library Budgets and Acquisitions
We work in libraries that are constantly evolving; collections are shifting formats, budgets are shrinking, and a new crop of millennial librarians are stepping up to lead through these changes. There is no single "right" way to manage a library budget or collection, but the perception of what makes a library great has changed as millennials have begun managing libraries in new and innovative ways. This session will present the budgeting and collection management approaches of several libraries (public, academic, and academic law) under the leadership of veteran library administrators through the eyes of new, millennial leaders. Attendees will then hear these millennial leaders' perspectives on how these strategies can be changed to better suit the libraries' current and future needs, including suggestions on how best to think strategically, with long-term goals in mind, and work with vendors, administration outside of the library (such as boards of directors or university administration), and library staff.

Moderators
BH

Bobby Hollandsworth

Learning Commons and Digital Studio Coordinator, Clemson University Libraries
Bobby Hollandsworth is the Learning Commons and Digital Studio Coordinator, Business Reference Librarian, and RefWorks Administrator at RM Cooper Library on the campus of Clemson University. He serves as the library liaison to the departments of Economics, Finance, Agribusiness, and Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management.

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Krenelka Chase

Ashley Krenelka Chase

Associate Director, Stetson University College of Law - Dolly & Homer Hand Law Library
Ashley Krenelka Chase is the Associate Director at the Dolly & Homer Hand Law Library at Stetson University College of Law in Gulfport, Florida.  As Associate Director, Ashley is responsible for the coordination and direction of the law library electronic resources, including database access, web page development, and electronic resource management, as well as coordination of acquisitions and reference and outreach services for the library... Read More →
avatar for Lindsay Cronk

Lindsay Cronk

Coordinator of Online Resources and Collections, University of Houston
Collections person.
EF

Ellen Frentzen

Assistant Librarian for Adminstration, Boston University School of Law
avatar for Christine  Weaver-Pieh

Christine Weaver-Pieh

Collection Resources Manager, Medina County District Library



Thursday November 3, 2016 10:30am - 11:15am
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:30am

Working in Partnership to Support Quality Research
Helping to support the best quality research in all fields is a core mission of both publishers and librarians. So how do we collaborate to do this and how could we do more? This talk will explore the ways that we work together to support both the production of quality research and the dissemination of the findings. Support for authors includes providing access to content as well as tools to help the process of writing and publication. In today’s world the new author is faced with a bewildering array of options and a few pitfalls to avoid. How can we do more to help them navigate this complex landscape? And as the researcher becomes more and more specialized and overwhelmed by the sheer volume of the published literature, how can we both work toward a shared goal helping researchers find and use the information they need and ensure that their work is read by their peers? In addition to journal articles, this might include data and grey literature, eg conference papers. Search and discovery plays a major role and is a key area of current and potential future collaboration between publishers and librarians.

Moderators
EC

Edward Colleran

Partner, Triumvirate Content Consultants

Speakers
avatar for Jayne Marks

Jayne Marks

Vice President, Global Publishing, Wolters Kluwer Health



Thursday November 3, 2016 10:30am - 11:15am
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

A New Open Source LSP? Oh My!
Recently, libraries learned of FOLIO - a new community collaboration to develop an open source library services platform (LSP). The collaboration of vendors and libraries is working to bring an LSP to market that includes traditional ILS functionality but also promises to innovate in dramatically new ways. The community - comprised of librarians and technologists, designers, service providers and vendors - has the potential to reshape the library technology space in ways we haven't seen before.

There's enormous possibility in this initiative, and as libraries it behooves us to explore further. What are our needs and wants when it comes to an open source LSP? How and when does open source become an option that allows for mass adoption? How should we as libraries innovate and how can we help shape the direction of the systems we rely on? And how, as a discipline, do we embrace change as we look towards the future of our technology space?

This panel will explore the new LSP initiative. We will look at our resource management needs, our need to align more closely with the broader academic institution, and the need for real innovation in library technology.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Information Systems Librarian and Associate Professor,, Millersville University
avatar for Neil Block

Neil Block

Vice President, Global Open Source Innovation, EBSCO
TF

Tania Fersenheim

Content & Applications Manager, Fenway Libraries Online
avatar for Michael Winkler

Michael Winkler

Managing Director OLE (Open Library Environment), OLE



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Author Identifiers in the Research Life-Cycle
This session will provide an overview of the role of author identifiers in scholarly communication, with a particular focus on ORCID and ResearcherID. Author identifiers help  solve the name disambiguation problem by providing researchers with a unique identifier that they can connect with their scholarly output, and use when submitting or creating future scholarly work. As an open identifier, ORCID is now embedded in hundreds of systems across all researcher workflows - funding, publishing, research institutions, scholarly associations, and more. ResearcherID, developed by Thomson Reuters (now Clarivate Analytics), is a proprietary author identifier that enables researchers to manage their publication lists, track their times cited counts and h-index, identify potential collaborators and avoid author misidentification; it’s also integrated with Web of Science and is ORCID compliant. After a brief overview of identifiers in the research infrastructure, there will be a short introduction to ORCID and ResearcherID, followed by strategies for librarians at colleges and research universities to encourage the use of author identifiers including ORCID and ResearcherID. The presentations will be followed by a panel discussion of key opportunities and challenges, learning points and successes, including a mix of pre-prepared and audience questions.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Chief Strategist for Research Collaboration, North Carolina State University
avatar for Joelle Masciulli

Joelle Masciulli

Head of Research Discovery, Thomson Reuters
Joelle has been with Thomson Reuters for over 15 years. She has held a variety of leadership positions in the organization with the IP&Science business and has very recently taken the position of Head of Content Strategy. In this role Joelle is responsible for developing and executing the content strategy to support all propositions within the Government and Academia markets. Outside of work, Joelle enjoys spending time with her... Read More →
AM

Alice Meadows

Director, Community Engagement & Support, ORCID
avatar for Mary Ellen  Sloane

Mary Ellen Sloane

User Services Librarian for Basic and Applied Sciences, Middle Tennessee State University
Mary Ellen Sloane is the Science Librarian and an Associate Professor at Middle Tennessee State University. Her research interests include scholarly communication, information literacy, library technology, and user experience.


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

COUNTER Release 5: Consistency, Clarity, Simplification and Continuous Maintainence
COUNTER published its first Code of Practice in 2003 and has since been improving this international standard to meet the evolving needs of its library, publisher and vendor membership. Work is now underway on Release 5 of the COUNTER Code of Practice with a promise that it will provide improved reporting on usage of scholarly information in an ever-changing discovery and access environment.  The themes of Release 5 are consistency, clarity, simplification, flexibility and continuous maintenance. This presentation addresses how Release 5 aims to address current challenges to ensure that all publishers and content providers are able to achieve compliance.

Speakers
avatar for Lorraine Estelle

Lorraine Estelle

Director, Project COUNTER
Lorraine Estelle is the COUNTER Project Director. Launched in March 2002, COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources) is an international initiative serving librarians, publishers and intermediaries by setting standards that facilitate the recording and reporting of online usage statistics in a consistent, credible and compatible way. | | Lorraine is experienced in the information industry with a background in... Read More →
avatar for Anne Osterman

Anne Osterman

VIVA Director, VIVA - The Virtual Library of Virginia
Anne Osterman is a librarian with over ten years of experience in academic libraries. She has worked in a variety of roles, including research data services, reference and instruction, acquisitions, and the licensing of electronic resources. She is currently Director of the Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA), the consortium of nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia. Anne holds a Master's degree in Library Science from... Read More →
avatar for Oliver Pesch

Oliver Pesch

Chief Product Strategist, EBSCO Information Services
Oliver Pesch works as chief product strategist for EBSCO Information Services where he helps set direction for EBSCO's e-resource services and products, including EBSCO Usage Consolidation and EBSCONET Analytics. Oliver is a strong supporter of standards and is very involved in the development of standards related to usage. He is currently co-chair of the NISO SUSHI Standing Committee; he is member of the Executive Committee for Project COUNTER... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Cutting the Cord: Learning to Live Without Comprehensive Journal Packages
Academic libraries have become increasingly dependent on large journal packages. Initially these “big deals” were a boon for libraries who needed to provide more online access to journal articles, but found it difficult to manage, much less pay, for these serials. Journal packages represented both convenient aggregated access and to some degree savings, but over time librarians started to question whether the “big deal” was really worth it. Article usage statistics were good overall, but were all of the titles being used enough to justify paying for them as part of a large online collection? Rising costs and lack of control over the exact content paid for are making some libraries question the real value of journal packages.

Using a case study with an anonymous publisher, this presentation will provide a review of the decision making process that ultimately led to the cancellation of an entire large journal package (over 1400 titles) at San Francisco State University’s J. Paul Leonard Library. The rationale behind this decision was based on a detailed cost/use analysis of the package. Another factor in the decision was the challenge of maintaining other resource commitments in an environment with a stagnant collections budget. Because of this the Library had to prioritize resources including journal packages. The presentation will include a summary of the data analysis involved. It will also provide a discussion of the impact the decision has had on the Library and the University as a whole. That impact included a need to communicate with stakeholders (and their reactions) as well as the desire to provide continued access to valued resources through other means, such as interlibrary services and “demand driven” models.

The “big deal” journal packages have become an important part of academic library collections in recent years, to the extent that they are often seen as indispensable, but the experience of J. Paul Leonard Library has shown that you can cut the cord and still survive.

Speakers
avatar for David Hellman

David Hellman

Collection Development Coordinator, J. Paul Leonard Library/San Francisco State University
David Hellman is the Collection Development Coordinator and an Associate Librarian at San Francisco State University. He has held previous positions at Santa Clara University, New York University and the Brooklyn Public Library. David has presented at several conferences including the American Library Association, California Academic and Research Libraries (CARL), the International Conference on the Book, the California Library Association... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Do We Approve? New Models for Assessing Approval Plans
Approval plans are an established method of acquiring library materials whereby a vendor selects material for a library based on profiles established by the Library. At Yale University, we allocate a significant percentage of our collections budget to monograph approval plans. While some academic libraries have reduced or eliminated book approval plans in favor of new acquisition models, like demand driven or evidence-based acquisitions, others, including Yale, continue to rely heavily on traditional approval plans for collection development.

Using fifteen years of Yale Library acquisitions and circulation data, we have developed models that allow for approval plan assessment by various facets, such as language, publication year, publisher, and approval vendor. We compare use of approval plan books, patron-requested purchases, and titles individually selected by librarians. We examine approval plan monographs in the context of resource sharing networks. We also examine approval plan acquisitions in the context of our growing collection of e-books, including licensed subscription models (Ebrary, Overdrive) and perpetual access e-book packages (e.g. Springer, Project Muse/UPCC). The goal is to create a viable model for ongoing assessment of our approval programs in the context of our overall collection development strategy.

Our findings have led to changes in Yale's approval plan profiles and have informed decisions about e-book acquisitions. Like all good analytics projects, the data also led us to ask more questions about community engagement with collections.

Attendees will learn about our assessment model and have the opportunity to pose questions about the data and user engagement.

This session is co-authored by Julie Linden, Associate Director of Collection Development, Yale University Library and Sarah Tudesco, Assessment Librarian, Yale University Library, who were unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Dollar

Daniel Dollar

Director of Collection Development, Yale University Library
Daniel Dollar is the Director of Collection Development for the Yale University Library. As the library’s chief collection development officer, Daniel leads and coordinates collection activities in all formats, and manages the collection development budget. In addition, he represents the Yale University Library as a participating partner with the Research4Life initiative.



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

From One to Many: Creating a Culture of Research Reputation Management
Faculty and the institutions they work for have increasingly strong needs to manage their research reputations. Syracuse University Libraries assists individuals and institutional offices in determining metrics such as the H index, citation counts, altmetrics, etc. and provides context to these metrics. The first presenter will illustrate how the Libraries provide assistance in managing one's individual research reputation using subscription based and freely available tools. The second presenter will outline how institutional wide reputation is being cultivated in cooperation with other campus units. Lastly, the third presenter will discuss the value of and how a subscription based vendor is vital to helping individual researchers and institutions increase their research reputation.

All three presenters will outline the resources needed to develop these tools and services - within the libraries, within the university, and while working with a subscription based vendor. They will discuss the challenges of capturing research output beyond traditional scholarly communication methods in these systems. Lastly they will share recommendations for developing research reputation management services at your own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Hill

Jennifer Hill

Customer Consultant, Elsevier
Jennifer Hill is a Consultant with Elsevier Research Intelligence, where she is responsible for ensuring value and use of solutions / products through customer training; and for increasing user engagement by providing reliable data and information to help improve an institution’s and individual’s ability to establish, execute and evaluate research strategy and performance. Jennifer is a graduate of Saginaw Valley State University, where she... Read More →
avatar for Anne Rauh

Anne Rauh

Science & Engineering Librarian, Syracuse University
Anne Rauh is the Science and Engineering Librarian and the Interim Collection Development and Analysis Librarian at Syracuse University Libraries. She holds a B.A. in International Studies and a M.A. in Library and Information Studies, both from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Anne is an active member of the American Society for Engineering Education and the Eastern New York Chapter of Association of College and Research Libraries. She has... Read More →
avatar for Scott Warren

Scott Warren

Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship, Syracuse University
Scott is the Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship at the Syracuse University Libraries. He provides strategic guidance for collection management, scholarly communication, and subject liaison librarian services. The department he leads plays a pivotal role in enhancing research, teaching and learning at Syracuse University. His progressively more responsible positions have included Head of Collections at SU Libraries and Associate... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

How Readers Discover Content in Scholarly Publications
The results of our large scale survey (n=40443) into researcher discovery behavior sheds a great deal of light on the adoption of library technologies by readers, by job role, sector, country, and region. They show the gulf between search resources used by librarians and those selected by their patrons in North America. In addition we can see to what extent institutional repositories are seen as a resource for scholars and can look forward to how recent changes in results display within Google Scholar may change the balance of where readers download journal articles.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Inger

Simon Inger

Consultant, Simon Inger Consulting
Simon Inger has been working in journals since 1987, when he joined B.H.Blackwell, the Oxford-based subscription agent. In late 1994 he founded CatchWord, the world's first journal platform service provider and ran that business until its acquisition by Ingenta in 2001 (now Publishing Technology). Since 2002, Simon has worked as a consultant specializing in journals, including: sales, marketing & pricing; journal delivery & platform selection... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

If You Can't Beat 'Em, Join 'Em: Embracing Alternative Avenues of Discovery

In our information-rich world, students and faculty can easily find a wealth of content through a wide range of discovery tools, often bypassing the library entirely or only coming back to the library inadvertently as the result of a successful search. The 2015 Horizon Library report has continued to identify this "Competition from Alternative Avenues of Discovery" as a difficult challenge. Libraries can either cede their traditional role in facilitating discovery or can embrace the potential of these new tools. Building on a session at this year's ER&L Conference, this session will explore how libraries can broaden their approach to discovery by enhancing single-search discovery services to better compete with other tools while simultaneously embracing the potential of new tools and technology to allow users a range of discovery options. This program will explore ways in which library discovery services can be optimized to provide easy access to owned, subscribed, and curated content, whatever the source; how a publishers can study usage patterns to maximize discovery and access; and how libraries can take advantage of innovative new tools and approaches to discovery.


Speakers
avatar for Bob Boissy

Bob Boissy

Director, Institutional Marketing and Account Development, Springer Nature
Bob spent the last 10 years in a variety of sales and marketing jobs for Springer, and the 15 years before that working in technical support and data exchange operations for a subscription agent. Bob is former Chair of the International Committee for EDI for Serials, and Past President of NASIG. Current work includes carefully monitoring usage of electronic resources for academic clients in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region, and working on... Read More →
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
avatar for Ido Peled

Ido Peled

VP, Solutions & Marketing, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

If You Ease the DRM, Will They Read?
This paper examines changes in readership of Canadian presses Ebooks due to the removal of restrictions by the publishers (DRM).

In 2013, the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) and 12 members of the Association of Canadian University Presses/Association Des Presses Universitaires Canadiennes (ACUP/APUC), in conjunction with eBOUND Canada, partnered to provide access via OCUL's Scholars Portal (SP) books platform. The license agreement included a section on Digital Rights Management (DRM) that asked SP to provide access control technologies to limit the use of content and devices. However, the license agreement also included a commitment by publishers to review DRM restrictions on an annual basis and gradually limit them.

Three years into the agreement and several publishers had already removed the restrictions for over two hundred titles. Titles that initially were loaded onto Adobe Content Server (ACS, the technology selected to enforce the DRM) and were limited to one user at a time, are now available with no restrictions.

Our paper will present the results of measuring use for titles that were moved out of the ACS and put onto the SP non-DRM platform. It will examine whether it is true to assume, as one often may, that DRM e-books do not encourage e-reading; has the use of titles no longer restricted by ACS really increased? Finally, it will discuss our strategy to overcome the difference in methods for measuring readership across platforms and technologies, in order to look at the use of specific titles.

Speakers
RH

Ravit H. David

Ebook Service Coordinator, Scholars Portal, University of Toronto
SK

Sadia Khwaja

Senior Developer, Scholars Portal, University of Toronto


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Librarians, Publishers, and Aggregators - The New Collaborators
Librarians, publishers and aggregators are collaborating more today than ever before. As demand for streamlined approaches to licensing of content increases and content types evolve libraries, publishers and content aggregators have been working together to develop solutions for licensing content to enhance research and scholarly collaboration.

Consider eBooks and eJournals, fragmentation of content into individual articles, images, video and more. The advent of gray literature such as blogs and tweets as part of the research cycle. This ever-expanding need for content of all types has increased the need to develop tools to enhance research and discovery of the right content no matter the format. And of course there is copyright. Doesn't copyright always factor when licensing content?

This session will update us all on the latest and greatest licensing solutions and include an interactive discussion with the audience to hear what they are adopting, developing or hoping for!

Topics include:





  • How publishers, libraries and aggregators are jointly developing unique content sets that best target the needs of the academic and research community



  • How non-traditional content, like blogs and tweets, are used by library researchers that otherwise would be difficult to discover and collect.



  • The opportunities to license fragments of content including images and video and the value they bring to content creators and consumers



  • The role of copyright-how all this activity can be done legally and easily




Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications, UNC Greensboro
EC

Edward Colleran

Partner, Triumvirate Content Consultants
avatar for Steven Heffner

Steven Heffner

Director of Product Strategy, Health Learning, Research & Practice, Wolters Kluwer
Steven Heffner has been involved in publishing information for professional audiences for almost 25 years, a career that spans the transition from print to digital and includes editorial and management roles in scholarly publishing and business information. He led the business intelligence and consultancy firm Simba Information and directed digital product development at MarketResearch.com/Profound. Since 2014, Steven has been the Director of... Read More →
avatar for Larry Schwartz

Larry Schwartz

President, ACI Information Group
ACI Scholarly Blog Index is a research database currently available for academic libraries and research institutions in one-year and multi-years subscriptions. ACI's audience is students, librarians, and faculty looking for up-to-date commentary and opinion on scholarly topics. When he’s not adding value to content, Larry is a show manager for hunter/jumper horse shows, is on the Board of Directors for the Connecticut Horse Show Association... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Open Access and Open Data, Rolling with the Times: Case Studies of Librarians Helping Authors and Institutions Comply
As mandates for open access expand beyond publications into open data, librarians continue to play a central role. This panel will include representative case studies around the variety of roles librarians assume in helping both the authors and their institution remain in compliance. Librarian contributions include interpreting funder policies and publisher offerings, researching and/or making available financial resources to support open efforts, advocacy, ensuring authors make the right choice to meet their funders' requirements, overseeing payments, and handling deposition to institutional and funder required repositories. Through key exemplar cases, this panel seeks to provide a common understanding of the variety of roles librarians have come to play in an open world, to identify challenges they continue to face in their efforts, and to share solutions to those problems.

Moderators
DH

Darla Henderson

Asst. Director, Open Access Programs, American Chemical Society

Speakers
avatar for Amy Hodge

Amy Hodge

Science Data Librarian, Stanford University Libraries
avatar for Erja Kajosalo

Erja Kajosalo

Collections Specialist & Chemistry Librarian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Mira Waller

Mira Waller

Associate Head of Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Reimagining the Library: Relationships between Library Collections, Space and Public Services
What defines the library - the collections or the services? How do libraries stay relevant and respond to users' needs? Ask any group of users and one can expect an equally diverse response based on the premise of what the need of the moment is. Increasingly, academic and public libraries are creating new service points to help users develop fresh or different skills. As the diversity of communities increase due to immigration, social change, demographic shifts, the role of the library increases, too. The Makerspace and Gaming Studios, technical writing and resume labs, outdoor reading spaces and collaborative work spaces, in addition to the range of public events and exhibitions taking place in libraries expands the scope and reach of both campus and community services. Equally important, these service areas bridge the role libraries have with other academic and civic units and businesses within the community. Being responsive at the time of need is among the challenges libraries face in the planning and execution of new services that build on collection strengths and directions. Digital natives have different needs and expectations of libraries and using social media to increasingly connect with users has seen profound advantages. Many successful marketing and communications strategies and examples that promote libraries and their collections and services will be shared by creative staff from the Rotterdam Public Library and the University of California, Irvine Libraries that will showcase the links between the discovery of collections and services and the diverse communities they serve.

Speakers
avatar for Charla Batey

Charla Batey

Communications & Events Officer, University of California, Irvine Libraries
Charla Batey, MBA, is the Communications and Events Officer for the UCI Libraries, where she oversees and directs strategic communications, marketing, public and media relations and special events. She is also member of the Libraries’ External Relations Team, and UCI's Community Relations Collaborative, Events Council, Strategic Communications Council and was a member of UCI’s 50th Anniversary Committee (2014-16). She has worked at the... Read More →
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine Libraries
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies to promote better, more sustainable and more affordable online access best described as new potential in scholarly communication practices.  
TK

Theo Kemperman

Director, Bibliotheek Rotterdam


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Shotgun Session: Collection Development Analysis and Assessment Thread
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1. Setting our "sites" on a tiered collection: One major health care system's rapid expansion (Laura Schimming)

Institutional mergers and affiliation changes occur rapidly, especially in health care, and librarians should be equipped to respond to these changes in library collections, user populations, and budgets.  When Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai combined with a health network of four large teaching hospitals in 2014, Mount Sinai's Levy Library was suddenly charged with providing library access for four new hospital sites, including a huge increase in the number of faculty, nurses, and resident physicians.  

This presentation will discuss institutional affiliation changes from the library's perspective, including the Levy Library's process of building library access for a greatly expanded user base and additional hospital sites "from the ground up."  This project included efforts to extend existing library subscriptions to additional sites, remove duplicate spending, negotiate with vendors to leverage current spend levels, manage 5 different budgets, and communicate with stakeholders.  This presentation will also examine the library's ultimate decision to create a two-tiered library collection, including one tier for academic users and one for hospital users.
 
2. The Stratigraphy of Subject Liaison Work: Using Data Visualization as the Bedrock for Faculty-informed Collection Development (Stephanie Hess)
 
As subject liaisons, we frequently gather input from faculty members in our assigned departments to help inform collection development decisions. Faculty expertise paired with the cost data and usage statistics harvested by librarians offers us a better overall picture of the true value and impact of a particular journal title or database when managing our print and digital subscriptions. However, engaging faculty members in such conversations can be quite challenging. 

Data visualization can help drum up dialogues about collections, particularly in disciplines which rely heavily on modelling. For example, upon inheriting the environmental studies, geology, and map subjects at Binghamton University, I received a lengthy Excel spreadsheet of journals ranked by the faculty that included pricing, fund codes, and usage statistics from 2003-2008.  After adding missing years of data, I uploaded the revised file to our electronic resource management system which acts as the central repository for recording commentary by librarians and faculty.

This approach created a rich, multi-layered data deposit, ready to be excavated in order to build interactive models to share with geology faculty when discussing collections decisions. Ideally, presenting data in more exciting formats will help facilitate the annual review of library resources purchased with geology funds and assist with budget justifications as necessary. Possessing a limited science background, I hope to garner new faculty input so as to better assess and expand our extant geology collection, thereby ensuring that the Binghamton University Libraries continues to meet the ongoing research needs of its geology faculty and students. 
 
3. Create Impact with Data Visualization (Kathleen Bauer) 

Making an effective argument about the library collection and its use is key to winning backing for the collection budget, but it can difficult to attract and hold people's interest when giving them a lot of information about a collection. This challenge is complicated by the complex, large amount of data that are used to describe the collection and its use.  Data that need to be communicated include pricing, size, rate of growth, and use. These data need to be further explored by subject and format. Conveying this information can require many dense tables of data, which most people do not have the desire or time to read and digest. Charts can also be used, but traditional charts are static and do not allow the user to select data to explore in depth.  People are more interested when data are presented in attractive ways that are meaningful to them. Used well, data visualization is a great tool that can make it possible to present complex data in a concise and understandable manner.  Tableau, a web-based data visualization software, can be used to create a small number of charts with high impact that bring together many types of data. Because charts created in Tableau are web-based and interactive, they can be designed to give a single, high-level view of data, while also letting the individual viewer select more granular, detailed views.  This talk will show Tableau charts used by one academic library to successfully argue for budget increases. 

4. Designing Adaptable Tools for In-House User Studies (Alison Bradley, Rachael Winterling)

This session will provide a brief update on the work of the Charlotte Initiative's User Experience research team, comprised of 15 members representing 11 institutions, who are researching the ways libraries and publishers evaluate user experience with eBook collections in academic libraries. During summer 2016, the group is designing user studies and focus groups to conduct in-person assessments of user experience with eBooks in academic library settings. After testing the materials at multiple institutions, the group hopes to openly share replicable materials like task lists and question prompts that will allow individuals at other institutions to develop their own customized studies. The goal of this project is to develop a toolkit that institutions can utilize to conduct assessments of eBook platforms with a multitude of user groups.The session will provide updates on the first round of user tests, and give advice on collaborating across institutions as well as on designing and adapting appropriate criteria for user studies in-house. A complete update on the results of the project will be provided at an open conference in Charlotte in Spring 2017, and the toolkit will be made publicly available at that time as well.
 
5) Adding and Slashing Serials (Zeb Evelhoch)

This presentation will be two-fold and discuss how during a time of stagnating budgets and raising journal costs, Central Washington University Brooks Library evaluated and added popular print magazines and worked with faculty to eliminate redundant and low use journals. The process of identifying the need, researching, evaluating and gaining student input for popular magazines to be added to a recently opened coffee shop will be the first topic covered. Secondly, this presentation will cover how the library identified journal titles received in multiple formats and low use/high cost titles, then worked with faculty to change access models to realize a net savings. Participants can gain insight on how to identify low use and repetitive titles as well as how to gain feedback from students for creating a popular magazine collection and work with faculty on access changes. 

Moderators
CF

Cris Ferguson

Director of Technical Services, Murray State University

Speakers
KB

Kathleen Bauer

Director, Research Services and Collections, Trinity College
avatar for Alison Bradley

Alison Bradley

Collection Development Librarian and Liaison Coordinator, Davidson College
ZE

Zeb Evelhoch

Electronic Resources Librarian, Central Washington University, Brooks Library
Zeb Evelhoch is Electronic Resources Librarian, Assistant Professor at the Brooks Library, Central Washington University. He oversees the Serials & Electronic Resources Department, is responsible for the acquisition, budget, and access management of electronic resources and serials, assists users with troubleshooting access issues, serves as a department liaison, and provides instruction in the Library and Information Science minor.
avatar for Stephanie Hess

Stephanie Hess

Electronic Resources Librarian, Binghamton University (SUNY)
Stephanie P. Hess has worked in a variety of Technical Services positions since 1998. She is currently the Electronic Resources Librarian at Binghamton University (SUNY) and possesses an extensive background in acquisitions, cataloging, collection development, and serials management.
avatar for Laura Schimming

Laura Schimming

Assistant Director, Levy Library, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
avatar for Rachael Winterling

Rachael Winterling

Usability Coordinator, UNC Charlotte



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Supporting Research Information Management in the Research University: Partnerships, Challenges, and Possibilities
Research universities are increasingly engaging in complex efforts to collect and synthesize information about an institution's research footprint. The collection, updating, and sharing of the campus' bibliographic research outputs is an increasingly important part of this effort, as institutions seek to develop external profiling systems and enable collaborator discovery and to also increasingly internally understand the research strengths and synergies of an institution for planning and assessment. Institutions are adopting a variety of tools to support research information management (RIM), faculty activity reporting (FAR), and researcher collaboration and discovery on campus. In this presentation, we will talk about the complex and enterprise wide institutional environment in which this research information management effort is taking place, including an overview of the multiple stakeholders: libraries, research offices, colleges and departments, provosts, and many others. The University of Illinois and Virginia Tech University will provide in-depth case studies about their own campus efforts, talking specifically about campus partnerships, RIM products, bibliographic data sources and gaps, implementation challenges, and faculty engagement. We will conclude with a discussion about the opportunities for greater interoperability between siloed campus systems that collect bibliographic metadata, and the important and evolving role of the library in this emerging and poorly defined community of practice.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Bryant

Rebecca Bryant

Senior Program Officer, OCLC Research
avatar for Beth Namachchivaya

Beth Namachchivaya

Associate University Librarian for Research, University of Illinois
JS

Julie Speer

Associate Dean for Research and Informatics, Virginia Tech



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

The Big Picture: A Holistic Viewpoint of E-book Acquisitions
This presentation details the complete process map of e-book acquisitions at Loyola Marymount University's William H. Hannon Library. In this presentation, we extend and update the model used by Beisler & Kurt (2012) for current workflow considerations. In particular, we will highlight an expansion of the paths that an e-book can take, discuss the improvement of discoverability through cataloging services and review, and look at quality control techniques such as access and link checking. 

Objective of the session: While most literature focuses on certain aspects of e-book workflow, this presentation attempts to portray a holistic viewpoint of e-book acquisitions. By capturing the complexities of the process and visualizing it from the perspective of the big picture, it serves as a guide when writing more detailed procedures, helps us recognize appropriate staffing to perform a task, and it shows how different people interact with one another as part of the process. 

What attendees can expect to learn: Attendees will engage with a complete workflow procedure for the different paths of e-book acquisitions. By attending this presentation, participants may identify a component of this workflow they could implement at their own institutions to improve user satisfaction with e-books. Through audience participation, we hope to create a wider discussion to learn what others in the room are doing with their own e-book acquisitions workflow.

Speakers
avatar for Marie Kennedy

Marie Kennedy

Serials & Electronic Resources Librarian, Loyola Marymount University
RL

Ron Lewis

Acquisitions Librarian, Loyola Marymount University


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

The Right Stuff at the Right Cost and for the Right Reasons
As libraries look to surface unique special collections, or preserve/replace deteriorating print resources with more durable and functional digital surrogates, it is important to come to grips with the pros and cons of a variety of available strategies for achieving library goals. The default strategy has been to let commercial interests take the lead in developing and managing this content; libraries then deciding to buy or not buy based on perceived local interest.  Increasingly, though, we're seeing experimentation with other models that give the library community greater control over selection decisions, standards for digitization, long-term archiving, and terms for accessibility.  The following business models will be considered with an eye to building a higher degree of support for library and user friendly strategies for building significant digital corpora:


  • Locally funded and maintained digitization with post-hoc aggregation of metadata in initiatives like DPLA

  • Library-led and communally funded initiatives like the Text Creation Partnership

  • Agency partnerships with entities like Reveal Digital that can help prioritize, fund, digitize, and aggregate open-access digital resources.  



These and related business models speak to the aspiration of many libraries to find more sustainable approaches to making archival resources more globally visible, accessible and useful.  Participating panelists will speak to the relative merits and limitations of emerging strategies for curating library special collections.

Moderators
avatar for Mark Sandler

Mark Sandler

Consultant, Novel Solutions
Novel Solutions provides consulting services and project support for research libraries and scholarly publishers. Typical projects cover such activities as product development; board or staff meeting facilitation; visioning exercises and strategic planning; sales, marketing and outreach enrichment; developing pricing models and budget projections; customer acquisition and campus communication strategies.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Frick

Rachel Frick

Business Development Director, DPLA
Community builder with experience in network building, creative problem solving and outreach. Strong believer in the power of librarians to influence change and build stronger, knowledgeable, empowered communities. Passionate advocate for open culture and it potential transformative impact on the creative marketplace.
avatar for Peggy Glahn

Peggy Glahn

Director, Reveal Digital, Reveal Digital
I collaborate with scholarly institutions to expand access to archives and special collections in the humanities. At Reveal Digital, we are committed to changing the publishing paradigm for libraries. Our approach brings together libraries that own special collections of interest to the wider scholarly community with libraries willing to invest in digitizing those collections for open access to all. Our library crowd-funding marketplace... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Rhind-Tutt

Stephen Rhind-Tutt

President, Alexander Street Press
Rhind-Tutt has worked in electronic publishing for libraries for more than 27 years. Before co-founding Alexander Street Press in 2000, he worked for Gale, Proquest/Chadwyck-Healey, and SilverPlatter in a number of different roles. During that time he was responsible for the creation or development of more than 400 different products serving a wide range of libraries.
avatar for Rebecca Welzenbach

Rebecca Welzenbach

Director of Strategic Integration and Partnerships, Michigan Publishing
University of Michigan



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

The World of ISSN - Standards Revisions and Related Projects
This session will provide updates to several ongoing projects of interest to the library, publisher and vendor communities, including the International ISSN Centre-Ulrich's ISSN project, the revision of ISO-8, the revision of the ISSN Standard (ISO-3297), and an IEEE project to improve the ISSN in their metadata. Attendees will learn which national centers are participating in the ISSN IC-Ulrich's project and how that project benefits the greater community of scholarly publishers and users of scholarly information. There will be a discussion about the project plan and progress of the ISO-8 revision (Presentation of Periodicals) which is related to ISSN and the NISO PIE-J Recommended Practice. The status of and details about the proposed ISSN Standard Revision will also be included. Rounding out the program will be information from IEEE regarding their work on a project to improve the inclusion of ISSN in the metadata that accompanies the periodical and conference serials files they send to various services and providers. There will be time for discussion and questions on any or all of these topics.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Kaplan

Laurie Kaplan

Sr. Project Manager, ProQuest
Laurie Kaplan, as Director of Editorial Operations at ProQuest, facilitates efforts of the international database and the Serials Provider Relations teams. Throughout her career of over a decade at ProQuest, Laurie has successfully directed the international data team responsible for Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, Ulrich’s Web, and the multinational databases in 360 Core. Prior to joining ProQuest, Laurie worked in legal directory... Read More →
avatar for Regina Reynolds

Regina Reynolds

Director, U.S. ISSN Center; Head, ISSN Section, Library of Congress
Regina Romano Reynolds is director of the U.S. ISSN Center and head of the ISSN Section at the Library of Congress. She was a member of the U.S. RDA Test Coordinating Committee and co-chaired the internal LC group that recommended LC projects based on the report of the Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control. Reynolds is a member of the CONSER BIBFRAME working group, and member of the ISSN Review Group, an international effort... Read More →
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Manager, Discovery Service Relations, IEEE



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Understanding the Wider Impact of Scholarly Research with New Metrics
The last six years have seen an enormous explosion both in the availability of new metrics, and in the interest in emergent types of scholarly output. Altmetrics, socio-economic indicators and many other indicators are vying for your attention; funders and policy-makers are increasingly considering how to use metrics in their decision-making.

Are altmetrics are at risk of becoming just another number that faculty shoehorn into their tenure dossiers, selecting the numbers that make them look the best?

Our four speakers will present new ideas and approaches understanding issues of wider impact, which will be followed by a question and answer session.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Coates

Heather Coates

Digital Scholarship and Data Management Librarian, Indiana University Purdue University - Indianapolis (IUPUI)
Heather Coates is the Digital Scholarship and Data Management Librarian at the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship. She provides research data and research metrics services, manages the campus data repository, engages in research data policy development, and supports open research practices. In order to create a complete and durable scholarly record, Heather advocates for greater openness in research processes and equal access... Read More →
avatar for William Gunn

William Gunn

Director of Scholarly Communications, Mendeley
Dr. William Gunn is the Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley, a research management tool for collaboration and discovery. Dr. Gunn attended Tulane University as a Louisiana Board of Regents Fellow, receiving his Ph.D in Biomedical Science from the Center for Gene Therapy at Tulane University in 2008. His research involved dissecting the molecular mechanism of bone metastasis in multiple myeloma and resulted in a novel treatment approach... Read More →
avatar for Helen Josephine

Helen Josephine

Head of the Engineering Library, Stanford University
Helen Josephine is the Head Librarian at the Terman Engineering Library at Stanford University. She is the subject liaison and bibliographer for the School of Engineering departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Electrical Engineering, and Management Science and Engineering. She also offers workshops and consultation to all students and faculty on campus on citation management tools and research databases. She is the Stanford University... Read More →
MT

Michael Taylor

Head of Metrics Development, Digital Science



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

We'll Do It Live: Building Access to Video Content Based on Freedoms of Use
Film collections in academic libraries, including streaming video and DVDs, serve a variety of user populations and needs. Videos are used by faculty as part of instruction, by student clubs or other groups as part of public programming, and by individuals for personal study or entertainment. These various use situations are addressed by the Copyright Act and license agreements that accompany video purchases. To maximize use of video collections (and by extension, funds expended on video collections), libraries need to fully understand their rights under the law, track video licenses, and build access around freedoms to stream and publicly display videos. The George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida undertook a project to identify videos acquired with public performance or streaming licenses and better communicate the existence and meaning of these licenses to users. This project included new workflows for cataloging and acquisitions, training for library faculty and staff on uses of video allowed under the Copyright Act and when a license should be obtained, and development of a front-end search and browsing discovery interface for users to find video content by public performance and streaming rights. Audience members will learn how to acquire, catalog, and build access to video content based on freedoms of use.

Speakers
avatar for Aimee Barrett

Aimee Barrett

Print & Media Unit Manager, University of Florida
avatar for Christine Fruin

Christine Fruin

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Florida
avatar for Allison Jai O'Dell

Allison Jai O'Dell

Metadata Librarian, University of Florida
Allison works in technical services for special collections and archives. Her research and development projects focus on metadata, Linked Data, and front-end Web development. Details and CV: http://www.allisonjai.com
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

E-Resources & Acquisitions Librarian, University of Florida, Smathers Libraries
I am the Electronic Resources & Acquisitions Librarian at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. My work focuses on collaborating with librarians, administrators, consortial partners, vendors, and publishers to coordinate the collections and acquisitions activities for the Libraries. My research focuses on assessment of collections and acquisitions practices and methods, including the collection development methods... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:00pm

The Evolution of Ebook Collection Development: Why DDA & Access-To-Own Are Here to Stay
Registration Required

Given shifting budgets, a return to the days of using approval plans or a single way to purchase ebooks is not an option. In fact, 70% of librarians recently surveyed report that they rely upon multiple acquisition models in their collection development strategy.

ProQuest is at the forefront of creating and delivering Demand Driven Acquisition (DDA) models to help libraries meet user needs within budget. We invite you to a luncheon to celebrate the launch of Access-To-Own (ATO), a new model built in collaboration with librarians and publishers as a way to apply short-term spend toward ebook ownership.

Featured speaker Tony Davies, of Australia’s Swinburne University of Technology, is a longtime DDA user. “For us it is a way to provide access to a much wider pool of titles than we could if we only looked at major publishers and aggregators,” he says. Tony joins other librarians at this luncheon to talk about the advantages of combining DDA and ATO to provide robust collections full of diverse content.

Moderators
avatar for Kari Paulson

Kari Paulson

VP and General Manager - Ebooks, ProQuest

Speakers
avatar for Tony Davies

Tony Davies

Manager, Information Support Services, Swinburne University of Technology
Tony started working as a librarian at Swinburne on a 2 week contract in 1987 and he's still there, although he has taken on a number of different jobs over the years including the newly created role of of Electronic Resources Librarian in 1993. He is currently manager of Information Support Services, which includes acquisitions, serials, datasets, cataloguing and resource management.


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Stars Restauant, Wilkinson Room 495 King St, Charleston, SC 29403

12:30pm

FOLIO: A New Open Source Library Services Platform (Sponsored by EBSCO)
RSVP Required - Lunch provided at 39 Rue de Jean

Traditionally, the library services platform (LSP) has focused on providing a comprehensive, all-in-one solution for the management of library operations. Yet, at the same time, the traditional LSP has not been able to fulfill all needs. Indeed, as one size does not fit all, libraries increasingly look at adopting tools that provide much desired functionality underserved by the LSP. These tools run the gamut from stand-alone discovery, to integration with learning environments, support for financials, integration of institutional repositories, deployment of self-check systems, and much more.

This presentation will discuss FOLIO, a new library and vendor collaboration that has been developing a new open source library services platform. The presenter will discuss the principles of extensibility, allowing any library or developer to readily develop and deploy applications. And the presenter will look at the ideas behind ‘supported open source’ in which multiple service providers will provide end-to-end services for the open source FOLIO platform.

Speakers
avatar for Neil Block

Neil Block

Vice President, Global Open Source Innovation, EBSCO


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:30pm - 2:00pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

ATG Special Issue Roundtable: Content for Courses
Building on the articles in the November ATG Special Issue Content for Courses, this roundtable discussion will dive deeper into the special role that libraries play in content supporting curricula in higher education. Today's content needs can range widely from the traditional articles or textbooks to multimedia events and MakerSpaces. While US libraries have traditionally not held textbooks for student use, they have long played a central role in ensuring that subscriptions support teaching and learning, providing extensive e-reserves, and even participating in course-pack creation. From OER to Alternative textbooks, instructors have more options than ever before - and more questions for their librarians. Many types of publishers and vendors are experimenting with new business models to support classroom use of content, from e-textbooks to course materials solutions. If you assist faculty in acquiring or managing content to support teaching and learning, then this is the session for you!

Speakers
avatar for Bob Boissy

Bob Boissy

Director, Institutional Marketing and Account Development, Springer Nature
Bob spent the last 10 years in a variety of sales and marketing jobs for Springer, and the 15 years before that working in technical support and data exchange operations for a subscription agent. Bob is former Chair of the International Committee for EDI for Serials, and Past President of NASIG. Current work includes carefully monitoring usage of electronic resources for academic clients in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region, and working on... Read More →
avatar for Jessica Clemons

Jessica Clemons

Interim Director of College Libraries, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
avatar for Charles Lyons

Charles Lyons

Associate University Librarian for Discovery and Delivery, SUNY University at Buffalo
Charles Lyons is the Associate University Librarian for Discovery and Delivery at the University at Buffalo. Previously, he worked in the corporate library at Lehman Brothers and in the Science and Engineering Libraries at the University of Virginia. He received his MS from Drexel University in 2002.
avatar for Elizabeth McKeigue

Elizabeth McKeigue

Associate University Librarian, Santa Clara University
Elizabeth McKeigue is the Associate University Librarian for Learning & Engagement at Santa Clara University in California. In this role, she oversees activities related to research, teaching, outreach, assessment, and access & delivery services. Prior to 2010, Ms. McKeigue held positions at Harvard University, including Head of Circulation for Widener Library and Coordinator of Reference Services for Widener & Lamont Libraries. Ms. McKeigue... Read More →
avatar for Karen McKeown

Karen McKeown

Director Discovery & Analytics, Gale
I lead efforts at Gale, a division of Cengage Learning, centered on making the traditionally library focused resources Gale provides discoverable in the path of intended users - students, faculty and learners. Having a college aged daughter and being a part of a company whose legacy includes both the library and higher education publishing, I am most interested in helping to address cost, access, quality tradeoffs of affordable learning... Read More →
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Publisher and Content Strategy, ProQuest SIPX
I'm passionate about online learning, publisher and library technology, and wearables!


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Budgeting in an Academic Library
Are you always seeking to improve budgeting in your academic library? Are you fascinated by the challenge of predicting costs for subscriptions? I went on an "Academic Library Budgeting Roadshow," and had discussions with peers at seven other institutions. In this session, I will present a summary of my findings, then pose the same questions to the group. We'll discuss everything from the budget process and timeline, to allocating funds, to predicting subscription costs, to what you do if you go over or under budget, to flexibility, to deposit accounts, to Zero-Based Budgeting, to the biggest challenges we each face. Let's share our collective wisdom and brainstorm ideas for best practices in a world of tight budgets, new services, merging vendors, unpredictable cost increases, and rapidly changing purchase and delivery models. Additional questions to be discussed at the group's discretion as time allows.

Objective: Sharing budgeting practices with a goal of finding ways to improve our own.

Learning Expectation: Expect to learn more about other libraries' budgeting practices, and gain new perspective on your own.

Speakers
KW

Karin Wikoff

Electronic and Technical Services Librarian, Ithaca College


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Creative, Evolving, Relevant - Communicating the Library's Value
Sharing the results of T&F library focus groups, surveys, interviews and other research from 2016, this practical session will look at innovative ways libraries are communicating their value to a range of stakeholders. With concrete, low cost examples the audience can take back to their own institutions, the session introduces a shifted perspective on communicating value that goes beyond simply marketing new book titles or databases.

Hear stories from librarians who are finding ways to keep their libraries relevant by getting creative and leveraging resources they already have. Some of these stories include inviting alumni to library events, providing students with exclusive after-hours library access, involving adjunct faculty in collection management and using library catalogues to track more than just books.

Finding a fresh take on library value propositions begins with viewing the patron as a customer. Customers have choices and the library should always be a top choice for students and faculty alike. Our panel will explore actionable tactics including key elements of email marketing, effective training for new faculty members, hosting successful events and finding the time to get creative with these tips and tricks by using lean practices.

Publishers and libraries have a shared responsibility to connect the right content to the right reader; communicating the value of library services is essential to making that connection. Libraries are not only a collection of vital resources and research support, but the outward looking heart of an institution focused on students, faculty, and their wider goals.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Butler

Natalie Butler

Director of Library & Digital Product Marketing, Taylor & Francis
Natalie Butler is the Director of Library & Digital product marketing for the books business at Taylor & Francis. Within her role as Director of Marketing she leads a global team of marketers which drive the discovering of the research programme across the business, and is actively engaged in building and establishing networks across the library community.
avatar for Thurston Miller

Thurston Miller

Physical Sciences Librarian, Hesburgh Libraries - Chemistry-Physics Library
The physical sciences librarian in a branch library at the University of Notre Dame. He has a bachelor's degree in Mathematics and a master's degree in Library and Information Science both from the University of Washington.
avatar for Doug Way

Doug Way

AUL for Collections and Research Services, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Doug Way is the associate university librarian for collections and research services at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he provides leadership for the library's collection development and management, resource sharing, and scholarly communications programs. Doug has written and presented extensively on topics related to collection management, shared print, and the future of library collections. He has a bachelor's degree in history... Read More →
avatar for Krystie Wilfong

Krystie Wilfong

Collection Assessment and Analysis Librarian, Columbia University
Krystie is the Collection Assessment & Analysis Librarian for the Science and Engineering division of Columbia University Libraries. She received her B.A. from Gettysburg College in 2008 and her M.L.I.S. from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science in 2013. Previously, Krystie worked for a STM publisher providing marketing and implementation assistance to academic institutions.


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Ebook Deselection and Weeding: A Practical Approach
Ebook acquisitions are ubiquitous, due to the increasing availability of ebook collections, individual purchases, acquisition/purchasing options, providers, platforms, and breadth of subject matter included. Additionally, the concept of permanent library ebook collections is no longer a novelty, which calls into question the quality of previous purchases.

Prompted by the tremendous increase of ebooks in our academic four-year institution library's collection, our ebooks-preferred acquisition policy, the complexities and constraints of ebooks use, and no obvious end in sight to the number of ebooks acquired, we investigated and recommended an ebook deselection policy to deal with these complex issues.

This project was taken on by two librarians, a subject liaison librarian and the electronic resources librarian, to combine their expertise to work on evaluating the collection for deselection. We developed criteria and methodology to identify and deselect ebooks. This weeding effort is an ongoing one. Initially, we decided to evaluate a percentage of the collection and look at the material where accuracy of information and timeliness matter the most. Some of the factors that affected our decisions include, usage, date of publication, currency of content (relative to subject matter), Digital Rights Management (DRM), availability of newer editions, relevancy to the collection, and the acquisition model (subscription, Demand Driven Acquisition (DDA), outright purchase).

This presentation will be a step-by-step guide to the process of starting your adventure in ebook weeding. It is important for libraries to maintain our evolving collections to meet our patrons' needs.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Davidian

Christine Davidian

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Rowan University
SK

Samantha Kennedy

Life Sciences Librarian, Rowan University



Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

From Rivalry to Cooperation: Building Collaborative EBA
In September 2014, University of Florida, Florida State University, and Cambridge University Press embarked to implement a previously untested collaborative Evidence Based Acquisition model. Now two years later, with significant data to analyze, both the libraries and publisher can report on the program's successes and share lessons learned.  From the collaboration that first arose between UF and FSU to address a common problem to the publisher/library partnership that facilitated building a mutually beneficial program, this is essentially a story of adaptation which speaks to the Charleston Conference's annual theme: "Roll With the Times or the Times Will Roll Over You."  This session will focus on demystifying EBA and exploring the benefits of the Evidence Based Acquisition model for both library and publisher.

Moderators
avatar for Stephanie Kaelin

Stephanie Kaelin

Library Sales Manager, Cambridge University Press
Stephanie Kaelin enjoys a hybrid role, managing the Account Development program, which focuses on post-sale support and customer engagement, while also looking after sales in the NY region. She has over 10 years of experience at several major academic presses and is enthusiastic about finding areas of collaboration between libraries and publishers.

Speakers
avatar for Aimee Barrett

Aimee Barrett

Print & Media Unit Manager, University of Florida
avatar for Don Gallagher

Don Gallagher

Senior Library Sale Representative, Cambridge University Press
Don Gallagher has spent over 5 years in library sales at Cambridge University Press with a focus on online resources. He currently covers the Southeast US territory and has previously been responsible for the Midwest and Canadian territories. Working in library sales since 1990 for several well respected publishers, Don has seen many major changes over the years | and looks forward to being part of the continuing evolution of the library and... Read More →
avatar for Jason Heckathorn

Jason Heckathorn

Projects & Collections Liaison, University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries,
CM

Charles McElroy

Serials Department Head, Florida State University
avatar for Apryl Price

Apryl Price

Electronic Resources Collection Management Librarian, Florida State University
I’ve been the Electronic Resources Collection Management Librarian at the Florida State University Libraries since Fall 2010. Professionally my interests include electronic resource management systems and business models.
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

E-Resources & Acquisitions Librarian, University of Florida, Smathers Libraries
I am the Electronic Resources & Acquisitions Librarian at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida. My work focuses on collaborating with librarians, administrators, consortial partners, vendors, and publishers to coordinate the collections and acquisitions activities for the Libraries. My research focuses on assessment of collections and acquisitions practices and methods, including the collection development methods... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Gender and Negotiation: Practices and Strategies
In their groundbreaking work, Women Don't Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide, Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever (2003) cite an extensive body of research to establish the circumstances that make negotiation fundamentally more difficult for women than it is for men. [1] According to the authors, a significant factor in this discrepancy is that "before we decide to negotiate for something we must first be dissatisfied with what we have;" unfortunately, women are "satisfied with less." [2] What does this mean for a profession that is 83% female? [3] In this Lively Lunch, participants will be asked to both share positive and negative negotiation experiences and crowdsource successful strategies to ease the challenges of gender and negotiation.

1. Babcock, Linda, and Sara Laschever. Women Don't Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide. Princeton University Press, 2009.
2. Ibid., p. 41.
3. U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Household Data Annual Averages: Employed Persons by Detailed Occupation, Sex, Race, and Hispanic or Latino Ethnicity.” Current Population Survey, Table 11. Washington, D.C., 2015. http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat11.pdf.

Speakers
RF

Rachel Fleming-May

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences; University of Tennessee
Rachel Fleming-May is an Associate Professor in the University of Tennessee’s School of Information Sciences. Her research and teaching interests include assessment, academic librarianship, and the intersection of creative writing and information
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Licensing Program Strategist, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Licensing Program Strategist with LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources librarian at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Giving and Taking: How We Each Contribute to the Scholarly and Scientific Journal Ecosystem
The scholarly communication world has been in turmoil recently, as some participants call for radical change, others defend existing practices and systems, and still others push for incremental improvements. One aspect of the current system that makes these discussions difficult is the degree of isolation that often exists between its participants - publishers who understand little about libraries, librarians who have never edited a journal, authors with no idea how much the journals in their field cost, etc. Members of these groups run in different circles, attend different industry meetings, and monitor different listservs. None of us can know everything about all of the ecosystems in which we function; however, in light of the current ferment and disruption we are seeing in scholarly communication, knowing more about all parts of that particular ecosystem might be helpful to everyone involved.

This panel discussion will feature five different participants in the ecosystem of scholarly journal publication: two authors (one from the STEM disciplines and one from HSS), a journal editor, a journal publisher, and an academic librarian. Each will be invited to answer the following three questions:

1. What costs do I incur - in terms of time, energy, money, etc. - when carrying out my work?

2. What value do I bring to our ecosystem with the work that I do?

3. Of the things my fellow panelists do within our ecosystem, which are of the most value to me?

Following the panelists' responses there will be general discussion with the audience.

Moderators
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ivy Anderson

Ivy Anderson

Director, Collection Development & Management, California Digital Library
Ivy Anderson is the Director of Collection Development and Management at the California Digital Library (CDL), where she oversees a broad range of shared collections activities on behalf of the ten campuses of the University of California system.   Ivy was co-Principal Investigator on the Pay It Forward project, an investigation into the feasibility of a largescale shift of the journal literature to open access for North American... Read More →
EB

Erin Beutel

Associate Professor of Geology, College of Charleston
MC

Matt Cooper

Senior Editor, Wiley Publishing
AM

Anirban Mahapatra

Assistant Director, Editorial and New Product Development, American Chemical Society
JM

June McDaniel

Professor of Religious Studies, College of Charleston


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Habits of Highly Effective Weeding Teams and their Role in the Circular Economy
As renovation and large scale weeding projects are on the rise, academic librarians are faced with planning these projects while navigating restrictive policies on the handling of discarded books. Join representatives from the Love Library at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the University Library at University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, and Better World Books as we outline specific innovative steps to streamline the process, decrease weeding fatigue and remove barriers such as "surplus only" policies to find a reuse option that has a more positive impact on society, the environment, and global literacy.

The session will include a brief overview from both libraries providing clever and unique solutions to challenges with budget cuts and internal process followed by an engaging discussion with the audience.
Session attendees will be offered a weeding planning tool as well as step-by-step instructions on approaches that worked for the libraries.

Speakers
KM

Kathy Marks

Strategic Sales Director-Libraries, Better World Books
avatar for Tom Reich

Tom Reich

Collection Development Coordinator and Head of Acquisitions, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point University Library
Collection Development Coordinator & Head of Acquisitions, Gift Librarian. Associate Professor, Reference and Instruction Librarian. Liaison to Political Science, International Studies, Peace Studies, (History) and Military Science.
avatar for Michael Straatman

Michael Straatman

Circulation and Collections Manager, University of Nebraska-Lincoln University Libraries
avatar for Anne Swenson

Anne Swenson

Acquisitions, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point University Library


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

How in Sync Are We? What Academic and Public Libraries Can Learn From Each Other
Academic Libraries continue to strive to stay relevant to their educational communities composed of students, faculty and researchers while metropolitan or public libraries serve the needs of the general community composed of multi-generational and ethnically diverse scholars, students, professionals, recreational readers and gamers, who seek information in varied formats. The challenges today to respond to this range of service and collection needs is unsurpassed. Libraries have taken on the onus to be instrumental in fostering lifelong learning in a society that changes careers more often, has greater access to information online and more demands on their time and attention than ever before. How do our libraries respond to these changing and intensifying needs and what can we do to collaborate more between the academic and public sectors?

An exchange among four librarians representing both academic and public libraries will showcase how their libraries address these challenges, and offer insights in to programming and collection strengths that maximize what they can offer to their user base. Elevating this conversation are librarians from the Netherlands and the UK who will share how their constituencies require increasingly specialized services and resources that demand the use of diverse technologies, delivery mechanisms and help make the library a relevant and meaningful institution in their communities. Surprisingly, the differences that distinguish academic and public libraries in this digital era may be less significant than we think and the nature of the work and how it is conducted may tend to over-emphasize these differences.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine Libraries
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies to promote better, more sustainable and more affordable online access best described as new potential in scholarly communication practices.  
avatar for Melanie Huggins

Melanie Huggins

Executive Director, Richland Library
Melanie Huggins is the executive director of Richland Library in Columbia, SC. A noted expert in the areas of strategic planning, collaborations, leadership development and library staffing, she is a frequent speaker and facilitator for other libraries and organizations. Huggins came to Richland Library in 2009 from St. Paul Public Library, where she served as the director. | | In her time at Richland Library, she has introduced a new focus... Read More →
TK

Theo Kemperman

Director, Bibliotheek Rotterdam
avatar for Anja Smit

Anja Smit

University Librarian, Utrecht University
After an international career of over 20 years in library management and library automation, I joined Utrecht University in 2010. Previously, I have served as a university librarian at two other Dutch Universities (Nijmegen and Maastricht) and spent 3 years in the US. As an Executive Consultant for Nelinet (now merged in Lyrasis) I helped libraries on strategic and tactical planning, human resource management, facilities renovation, and other... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

How Time Flies: Reflections on 30 years in Acquisitions with a Few Suggestions for the Future
An opportunity to look back and reflect on how Acquisitions has changed in 30 years from the viewpoint of the vendor/publisher and librarians. The panel members will provide a brief overview of their professional path and thoughts on what has most changed in acquisitions and vending over the years. The panel hopes to include the audience to share their own experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Eleanor Cook

Eleanor Cook

Assistant Director for Discovery & Technology Services, East Carolina University
Eleanor I. Cook has worked in the library field for over 30 years, and is currently Assistant Director for Discovery and Technology Services at Joyner Library at East Carolina University. She has had various technical services responsibilities including both monographic and serials/e-resources acquisitions, cataloging and preservation. She was President of the North American Serials Interest Group in 2002/2003. She has been active in other... Read More →
avatar for Denise D Novak

Denise D Novak

Acquisitions Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University
Denise Novak is a senior librarian and Acquisitions Librarian for the Carnegie Mellon University Libraries. She served as Chair of the Carnegie Mellon Faculty Senate in 2008-2009 and is currently Treasurer of the Faculty Senate. She is a former president of NASIG, served two terms as treasurer of NASIG, and has served on committees and task forces of several professional library organizations. She received her BA from Augustana College... Read More →
BS

Bob Schatz

Institutional Engagement Manager, NA, Springer Nature
Bob, who holds a library degree from the University of Oregon, is a long-time participant in the Charleston Conference and the larger library community. He has been a part of and hosted numerous panels and presentations and contributed to library literature, including as a past columnist for Against the Grain. Having spent over thirty years in bookselling to academic libraries. Bob is now part of a newly formed team of Institutional Engagement... Read More →
avatar for Steve Sutton

Steve Sutton

Regional Sales Manager/New York, Subscription Services Division & GOBI Library Solutions, EBSCO Information Services
Steve has over thirty years’ experience working with academic libraries helping to create cost effective strategies for selecting, ordering, receiving, and cataloging print and digital content. He has worked closely with collection development staff in over one hundred libraries to help build their print collections through approval plans. Steve has held various sales and sales management positions in a number of established and start-up... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Is Small Beautiful? The Position of Independent Scholarly Publishers in an Environment of Rapid Industry Consolidation
The publishing industry continues to consolidate, with large multinational publishers acquiring journals and other content from academic societies and independent publishers. This panel will provide candid insights into the challenges facing smaller publishers, including how/why they continue to exist in a business environment increasingly dominated by large companies. The discussion will also examine the advantages that smaller, independent publishers enjoy, and address their adaptation strategies, business planning (including open versus paid access models), strategic partnerships, technical infrastructure, production procedures, relationships with libraries, and the work needed to meet the evolving needs of library end users. The impact of industry consolidation on libraries, including that of the intermediaries between publishers and libraries, will also be discussed. The panel includes speakers from humanities, social science, and science publishers who can provide a range of perspectives from across the disciplines.

Audience members will take away a better understanding of the unique role that these presses play in the scholarly communications ecosystem. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and contribute to the group discussion after the panelists have shared their experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Cohn

Steve Cohn

Director, Duke University Press
avatar for Richard Gallagher

Richard Gallagher

President & Editor-in-Chief, Annual Reviews
avatar for George Leaman

George Leaman

Director, Philosophy Documentation Center
avatar for Charlie  Remy

Charlie Remy

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga



Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Liaison Librarians in the Know: Methods for Discovering Faculty Research and Teaching Needs
At the 2014 Charleston Conference, a panel of faculty members spoke on "What Faculty Want Librarians to Know." This session will continue the conversation begun by the 2014 panel, seeking to highlight ways for librarians to discover what the faculty at their home institutions wish that the library knew about their research and teaching needs. Using a case study of a liaison re-envisioning project at a large, research-intensive public university as the framework for this session, we will discuss methods for determining the curriculum and research needs of faculty across disciplinary boundaries and ways for promoting library resources and services to departments across campus. We will bring the perspectives of a business librarian and a literature/special collections librarian to the discussion to highlight how standardized, library-wide methods can address discipline-specific needs.

The objectives of this session include exploring models and methods for promoting library resources and services to our faculty partners on campus, identifying alternate routes to support faculty needs in the face of lean collections budgets, finding techniques for working around institutionally-specific challenges for gathering data, and communicating these needs to vendors.

After attending this session, participants will be able to articulate methods and processes for gauging faculty needs of the library for research and instruction across different disciplines. The session will conclude with an interactive discussion of how participants could adapt the techniques described for use at their home institutions.

Speakers
MG

Melanie Griffin

Special Collections Librarian, University of South Florida
NW

Nora Wood

Business Librarian, University of South Florida



Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Library Science Fiction: Finding Inspiration in the Implausible
Some of the most amazing innovations have come out of science fiction writing. Doors that open authomatically! Ipads! Wireless phones! These were once seen as crazy, outlandish, pie-in-the-sky ideas, and now they're a reality of our everyday lives. Librarians constantly lament the limitations of money, space, personnel, and time. What if those limitations were to no longer exist? What kind of future could we imagine if we threw off the shackles of circumstance?

Do you have crazy ideas about the future of libraries? Do you want to HEAR about and discuss crazy ideas about the future of libraries? Come to this round table discussion to brainstorm and discuss wild concepts! Who know? Maybe the next BIG idea in librarianship will come out of this session!

There will be a short presentation, followed by a round table discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsey Reno

Lindsey Reno

Acquisitions Librarian, University of New Orleans
Lindsey has been an acquisitions librarian since 2003, most recently at the University of New Orleans, where she started working in 2012. Her research interests include the shifting paradigms of acquisitions and collection development and the future(s) of librarianship. Her latest written endeavor was to serve as the guest editor for the September, 2016 issue of Against the Grain, titled: Emerging from the Dark(room): Tales of Adversity and... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Really Open, or Really Shut Away? How Do Researchers Discover that Elusive Open Access Content?
As the sheer volume of Open Access publications increases, one the most significant emergent challenges is discoverability. The OA content that publishers and authors create may well be free and available in theory, but how do readers find it?

Open Access content is everywhere - in institutional repositories, via OAPEN and DOAJ and on publisher's own websites - but researchers have a hard time locating exactly the quality-assured content are looking for, especially when it comes to relevant Gold Open Access content.

In this session, a distinguished panel of experts from across the scholarly publishing landscape will discuss the challenges brought about by the widespread shift to Open Access models, and the ways in which discoverability of appropriate peer-reviewed Open Access content can be addressed.

Moderators
avatar for Byron Russell

Byron Russell

Head of Ingenta Connect, Ingenta Connect
As Head of Ingenta Connect, I provide overall leadership and management of the commercial activities for Ingenta's flagship product, Ingenta Connect, providing content management solutions to 250+ publisher clients and 25,000 registered academic libraries. We've just launched Ingenta Open, a great new one-stop shop solution for researchers seeking OA content.

Speakers
avatar for Cesar Berrios-Otero

Cesar Berrios-Otero

Outreach Director, F1000
avatar for Eileen Lawrence

Eileen Lawrence

Senior Vice President, Alexander Street
I'm passionate about food (vegan), music (opera), theatre (put me in New York), friends (are family), and work (a happy addict). Passionate about new Alexander Street projects -- food studies; 20th-century Islam; disabilities; social work; borders and migration; classical scores (1.3 million pages!); human rights; more theatre and dance videos; more in counseling and therapy; more in anthropology, including a cool field-notes project. Excited... Read More →
avatar for David Sommer

David Sommer

Co-Founder, KUDOS
David is Product Director and Co-founder of Kudos - the award winning service for researchers, institutions and publishers to help maximise the impact of published work. | | David has over 20 years' of experience in the global publishing industry, having held senior technology and sales roles at Blackwell Publishing and a board level position at Macmillan. He ran David Sommer Consulting from 2009 and has worked with many leading publishers... Read More →
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Reviews of eResources for Libraries: Relevant or Retro?
A lively lunch structured to stimulate the exchange of information and opinions on the value of reviews, their influence on the purchase (or de-accession) of e-resources, trends in selection of e-resources, and new collaborative reviewing efforts. A brief panel presentation will open the luncheon. Different perspectives will be offered:

Librarian perspective (academic and public):
How do librarians use reviews? How do they evaluate, select, and/or cancel e-products? Who is involved in selection process? What kinds of information in reviews are most helpful? Are reviews providing a meaningful means of discovery of databases for librarians, faculty, and other researchers? How is the profession trending in terms of evaluating new products? What is overall toolbox for the selection of e-resources?

Publisher perspective:
How important are reviews to publishers? Do they still carry the same weight in purchasing decisions? How do reviews affect marketing and the development of new products/subjects?

Community/collaborative perspective:
What efforts have been undertaken to create community/consortia-based or crowd-sourced analytic reviews of databases? What are the challenges in creating and sustaining collaborative ventures? How are review sources evolving to meet current needs?

The panel presentation will be followed by an open discussion and exchange of ideas/opinions among all panelists and luncheon attendees, with the goal of attaining a broader understanding of the relevance of electronic resource reviews to various stakeholders and the ways in which traditional review processes are evolving/should evolve to address current library needs and expectations. The panelists will actively seek feedback from luncheon attendees. This is meant to be an interactive discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Klare

Diane Klare

Head of Reference Services, Wesleyan University
Diane Klare is Head of Reference Services/Interim Manager of Technical Services at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. She joined Wesleyan in 2002 and has served as Head of Reference services since 2006. From 2014 until 2016, she held the position of Interim University Librarian. Diane has a BA in French and a MBA in international business from the University of Connecticut, an MLS from Southern Connecticut State University, and a CAS... Read More →
avatar for Cheryl LaGuardia

Cheryl LaGuardia

Research Librarian, Harvard University
GM

George Machovec

Executive Director, Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries
avatar for Stephen Rhind-Tutt

Stephen Rhind-Tutt

President, Alexander Street Press
Rhind-Tutt has worked in electronic publishing for libraries for more than 27 years. Before co-founding Alexander Street Press in 2000, he worked for Gale, Proquest/Chadwyck-Healey, and SilverPlatter in a number of different roles. During that time he was responsible for the creation or development of more than 400 different products serving a wide range of libraries.


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Rolling the Elephant Out of the Room: A Discussion of Academic Liaisons and Collection Development
For the past two years, we have led very lively lunchtime conversations about a topic on the minds of many academic librarians: the changing role of the liaison librarian in the 21st century, and the approaches taken by our various institutions to address these changes. This year, we'll continue the conversation by focusing on one of the thorniest aspects of this re-visioning: collection development. Participants will be invited to share their perspectives, and group comments will guide the conversation. Framing the discussion will be several questions. As liaison librarians shift their energies to more outward-facing engagement and focus on the development and delivery of new services, what has happened to their traditional roles as architects of collections? How successful are we in molding our collections to the contours of our libraries in light of the ever-changing horizon? How exactly do we define "collections as service" in this new landscape? What kinds of expertise are needed for today's liaison librarian? And what does it mean to be a subject specialist if the actual choice of materials is guided by outside forces? Join us to share perspectives on these and other questions as we continue to work together to explore, assess, and re-imagine the role of the academic liaison.

Speakers
HL

Harriet Lightman

Head, Research & Learning Services, Northwestern University Libraries
Harriet Lightman heads Research & Learning Services at Northwestern University Library, and is the library's long-time liaison for history. She was formerly the Head of Academic Liaison Services, and Head of Research & Information Services at Northwestern, and served as a liaison and bibliographer for many subject areas, including economics, philosophy, and French & Italian.
MR

Marianne Ryan

Associate University Librarian, User Strategies, Northwestern University Libraries


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

The Short-Term Loan Roller Coaster: The Impact of Publishers' Increasing Prices on Library DDA Programs, or, It's One Heck of a Ride!
Libraries have explored new acquisitions models in recent years, in particular the use of short-term loans (STLs) and demand-driven acquisitions (DDA) of eBooks. The reasons for embracing these options are diverse: shifting collection development practices, assuring use of purchased materials, coping with lower budgets, offering access to supplementary content, expanding library services, etc. Once a DDA/STL program is in place, it can be a winning situation for libraries and their users; libraries can offer access to larger eBook collections than they could buy outright and pay only when content is actually used. However, skyrocketing STL rates are now coupled with lengthy embargo periods - either for front-list titles or for all titles - and more publishers are walking away altogether.

Two years after their 2014 Charleston Presentation, "Earnestly Attempting to Roll with the Punches: The Impact of Publishers - Short-Term Loan Rate Increases on Library Acquisition Options," librarians from four small consortia will document the impact that changes in STL policies and rates have had on their programs over the past two years, what steps they've taken to control increasing costs, and whether they will tweak or continue their DDA programs over the next year. Join us for an open discussion about this overall situation and how it might play out in the long run.

Speakers
avatar for Lorraine Huddy

Lorraine Huddy

CTW Librarian for Collaborative Projects, Connecticut-Trinity-Wesleyan / CTW Consortium
In 2008, I started coordinating consortial activities among the libraries at Connecticut College, Trinity College and Wesleyan University. My primary focus has been on collection development, and over time, I’ve vacillated from being an advocate of practices that favor ebooks to taking a more cautionary stance. The benefits seem increasingly outweighed by issues such as discovery, usability, shareability, and accessibility. For this... Read More →
AN

Ana Noriega

Assistant Director for Collections Management, Colby College
A former New Yorker and fashion librarian, I now spend my days at Colby College in Maine, managing a re-organized Collection Management department that includes: ILL, Campus Deliver, materials management of the Storage Facility, Technical Services, Acquisitions, ERM, and Collection Development. Colby is part of the renowned CBB library consortium, and, along with our beloved colleagues at Bowdoin and Bates, we manage to happily share a catalog... Read More →
MP

Michael Persick

Head of Acquisitions and Serials, Haverford College / Tri-College Consortium (PA)
Mike Persick is Head of Acquisitions & Serials at Haverford College Library. Along with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore Colleges, Haverford is a member of the Tri-College Library Consortium. Mike helped create and co-manages the Tri-Colleges' joint approval plan and joint DDA program.
avatar for Pamela Skinner

Pamela Skinner

Head of Collection Development, Smith College / Five Colleges Consortium (MA)
I spent most of my career as a reference librarian at Smith College, with a brief detour into interlibrary loan; I became Head of Collection Development at Smith in 2012. My years of working with users, both one-on-one and in classes, informs my work in developing collections. I also served as chair of the Five Colleges' Resource Management Committee from 2013-2015. Other consortium members are Amherst, Hampshire and Mount Holyoke colleges... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

The Whole Discovery Enchilada: How Close Are We to the Goal?
The 2016 edition of the PCG Library Budget Survey, a popular annual report that includes input from hundreds of libraries worldwide, added several new questions about indexed discovery services, and the replies were surprising:

Responses show that institutional search and discovery tools (which includes services such as Summon, Primo, EDS, etc.) have not yet reached "widespread" usage. While 76% of respondents are aware of institutional discovery tools, only 28% had already purchased such a service. Take-up is highest in the Academic sector (33%). Europe lags substantially behind North America in acquisition of discovery services.

This session will bring together participants from stakeholder communities - discovery service vendor, library, publisher, and standards developer - to discuss where we are in terms of reaching the goal of making all subscribed online content reliably discoverable from the library website. We will cover topics such as:

  • Are publishers providing the right content (i.e. metadata) to the discovery services? If not, what should they be doing?

  • Are the discovery services adding metadata reliably, quickly, and comprehensibly? If not, what should they be doing? 

  • Are librarians sufficiently aware of the consequences of how they configure their discovery service and how it can affect usage of their purchased subscription content?

  • How do discovery services owned by companies selling aggregated databases ensure against bias in their discovery systems? Is it enough? And usage stats from discovery services: who gets those? Who should get those? Are these usage stats configured to a standard so they can be accurately used?


Moderators
avatar for Janet Fisher

Janet Fisher

Senior Publishing Consultant, Publishers Communication Group
Janet Fisher has been in scholarly journals publishing for over 20 years, with stints at University of Texas Press and MIT Press. In 2003 she moved to Ingenta and then to Publishers Communication Group as Senior Publishing Consultant. Janet works with  academic and commercial publishers to support their marketing  efforts through research, telemarketing and content sales. 

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for Kate Hill

Kate Hill

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
I enjoy talking about all things geek, and exploring new food and beer places. Oh, I also enjoy talking UX for e-resource access and best ways to wrangle metadata into something useful.
avatar for Eddie Neuwirth

Eddie Neuwirth

Director of Product Management - Discovery Services, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
Discovery Services, User Experience, New Technologies
avatar for Tricia Newell

Tricia Newell

Marketing & Sales, ACSESS
Tricia Newell has been leading all publication sales and marketing activities for the Alliance of Crop, Soil, & Environmental Science Societies (ACSESS) since 2012. Tricia has degrees in Agricultural Industries Marketing and Environmental Horticulture, with special emphasis in propagation and marketing of cold-hardy fruit varietals from the University of Minnesota. | | ACSESS was created by the American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop... Read More →
avatar for Ken Varnum

Ken Varnum

Senior Program Manager, University of Michigan Library
I am the Senior Program Manager at the University of Michigan Library. In this role, I am responsible for three programs: the library's discovery interfaces (the "MLibrary" single search tool, ArticlesPlus, Search Tools, etc.), delivery interfaces, and the library's evolving and emerging analytics infrastructure.


Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

What are Subject Liaisons When 'Collections' and 'Subjects' Don't Matter?
The traditional subject liaison role is evolving. Users increasingly require functional information support (e.g., for GIS or data mining) rather than simply domain-specific. At the same time, reports from the ARL Pilot Library Liaison Institute and others have noted self-conscious trends towards developing liaison roles that engage and support the full research life cycle, as opposed to traditional service models focused on building and promoting library collections as more or less fixed products. This session will outline and collaboratively address the future of these new roles, with participants exploring questions that include: What does it mean to be a "collections" librarian in this new world? What "new" skills do we need to develop? What "old" skills should we not lose? How do we adapt both our institutions (and our individual staff) without sacrificing our (or their) very identities?

Speakers
avatar for Darby Orcutt

Darby Orcutt

Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
interdisciplinary research | TDM/ computational research - negotiations and agreements | library liaison roles | user-driven collections strategies
avatar for Mira Waller

Mira Waller

Associate Head of Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University Libraries
avatar for Scott Warren

Scott Warren

Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship, Syracuse University
Scott is the Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship at the Syracuse University Libraries. He provides strategic guidance for collection management, scholarly communication, and subject liaison librarian services. The department he leads plays a pivotal role in enhancing research, teaching and learning at Syracuse University. His progressively more responsible positions have included Head of Collections at SU Libraries and Associate... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Achieving the Holy Grail of Electronic Resource Management with Automated Holdings Feeds
Libraries face many challenges with maintaining electronic resource holdings that are constantly changing. In this session, attendees will learn how libraries, a content provider and a knowledge base are working together to ensure accurate, up-to-date holdings via automated, institution-specific feeds that save libraries both time and frustration.

Library panelists will share their e-resource challenges and lessons learned followed by publisher/partner perspectives outlining what it takes to create and share these feeds.
Be sure to join the conversation that follows and learn how automated holdings maintenance is a win-win-win for everybody!

Speakers
avatar for Antje Mays

Antje Mays

Professor / Acquisitions & Description Librarian, Winthrop University
avatar for Jozef Paulik

Jozef Paulik

Sr. Product Manager, Platform Integration, Elsevier
avatar for Jody Stroh

Jody Stroh

Product Manager, Metadata Services, OCLC



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Albatross: Rolling on a Sea of Data
In this session we will discuss the creation of a database for the purpose of pulling together journal usage data and cost data in a central environment where the data can be queried to use in return on investment analysis. Our database is named "Albatross" referencing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, it is both an omen of good or bad luck and represents the challenges and triumphs our team experienced in development.

We will share some of the challenges encountered while designing the database structure and creating a working database from the design. We will then discuss issues related to normalizing the data and our processes for creating effective workflows. We will also discuss the skill sets of the individuals who contributed to the creation process.

In examining the design process, we will share and walk through our final entity relational diagram and the reasoning behind why it is structured as it is. We will also explore our method of automating workflows through scripting in SQL and Python. In addition, we will talk about the normalization of five years of COUNTER and non-standard journal usage data, standardizing titles, packages, publishers, and platforms.

Finally, we will discuss our plans for assessment, analysis, and visualization of data retrieved from our database. This will be a look at future plans for using LibInsight to publish and create access to this data while allowing the curated data to be further paired with other data for more in depth analysis.

Speakers
AB

Annette Bailey

Assistant Director, Electronic Resources & Emerging Technology Services, Virginia Tech
Annette is the progenitress of the popular scholar's extension LibX (libx.org) and the new visualization of discovery code libFX (libfx.lib.vt.edu).  Is Annette a brunette Moses leading the Virginia Tech libraries into The Promised eLand or is she a modern-day Carrie Nation wreaking havoc in the saloons of print with her digital hatchet?  Yes, she is!
avatar for Tracy Gilmore

Tracy Gilmore

Collections Assessment Librarian, Virginia Tech
Tracy Gilmore is the Collections Assessment Librarian at Virginia Tech University Libraries. She coordinates assessment activities and strategies for developing the library’s digital collections. Her current research interests include discovery service usability, usage, and access.
avatar for Anthony Wright de Hernandez

Anthony Wright de Hernandez

Resident Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anthony Wright de Hernandez is the first resident librarian at Virginia Tech. He has over a decade of experience using and administering SQL databases. He now works primarily in Archives and Special Collections focusing on community collections. His primary research interest is on how libraries and archives can use technology to document and improve access to the histories of unique or underserved communities.


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

All About MOOCs: Online Learning is Alive and Well!
Although it may surprise you, MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) are more popular now than ever. Universities that began thinking about MOOCs at the peak of the hype cycle are often just now ready to launch. From lifelong learning to Master's Degree programs, MOOCs have found their place in global education. Come learn what is new in the world of MOOCs, including the innovative programs at Georgia Tech that are using a MOOC environment to reduce the cost of a degree. Explore options for licensing content for this new form of teaching and learning. Elsevier, Copyright Clearance Center, and ProQuest SIPX are all experienced supplying content into MOOCs with new and interesting models. Learn about student uptake of both free and for-purchase content. Learn how libraries and publishers are handling challenges and opportunities in this new learning space.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bowen

Tim Bowen

Director, Academic Products & Services, Copyright Clearance Center
Tim Bowen is the Director of Academic Products & Services at Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) in Danvers, Massachusetts. He joined Copyright Clearance Center in 2003 and is responsible for the development and management of CCC's pay-per use and annual licensing services for academic institutions as well as their award-winning Get It Now article delivery service. Mr. Bowen has over 20 years of product management, product marketing, and channels... Read More →
avatar for Lori Ostapowicz Critz

Lori Ostapowicz Critz

Assistant Dean, Collections Strategy, Georgia Tech
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Publisher and Content Strategy, ProQuest SIPX
I'm passionate about online learning, publisher and library technology, and wearables!
JV

Jeff Voci

Sales Director, Elsevier


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Apples to Oranges: Comparing Streaming Video Platforms
Librarians rely on an ever-increasing variety of platforms to deliver streaming video content to our patrons. Each platform has unique content and features. The panel is comprised of librarians representing different sized institutions with varied collection development goals. Participants will address some of the many ways librarians can think about the success of video platforms: content, subject usage analysis, return-on-investment, ADA compliance, and more. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and provide additional ideas for ways that librarians can analyze data to help guide collection development decisions for streaming video.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah E. McCleskey

Sarah E. McCleskey

Head of Access Services, Hofstra University Library
Copyright, resource sharing, streaming video, weeding, collection analysis

Speakers
avatar for Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson

Information Systems Librarian and Associate Professor,, Millersville University
avatar for Krista Higham

Krista Higham

Access Services Librarian, Millersville University
avatar for Steven Milewski

Steven Milewski

Social Work & Digital Media Technologies Librarian, University of Tennessee Knoxville
Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Works at UT Libraries as the Social Work and Digital Media Technologies Librarian and Library Liaison to the Office of Disability Services
MT

Monique Threatt

Head, Media Services, Indiana University Bloomington



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Assessing Power Relations in the Global Internet: Reading The Intersectional Internet, by S.U. Noble and B.M. Tynes, eds
This book turns a critical lens on the impact of the global Internet, by challenging its capacity to not simply reflect, but define and structure uneven power relations and social values through rapidly evolving  digital technologies, platforms and infrastructures. The fourteen essays in the book, written by leading scholars from various fields of cultural studies allied to information sciences/Library/media studies and the social sciences, adopt an analytical approach and theoretical perspectives, linked to the multi-faceted concept of "intersectionality." This allows the authors to critically investigate the complexities of the multiple differences in the controlling ideologies, identities and outcomes embedded in their own fields of research. 

This presentation will invite librarians and other information specialists to explicitly identify, contextualize and critically assess the impact of these new lines of inquiry on their multi-dimensional work experiences: Internet studies, computer code, resource selection, reference interaction, bibliographic instruction and other research needs of users in an increasingly diverse environment. 

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Coordinator/Librarian of Collection Development, De Pauw University Libraries
Joyce is an academic librarian (Professor) and Coordinator of Collection Development at DPU, where she has worked for many years. She earned both PhD (French Literature)and MLS degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Her primary services include assessing and selecting subject collections, crafting and revising policies for the development and management of resources for subject holdings. Her wide-ranging scholarly interests include... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

E-books and Young Academic Users: What Do We Know?
Academic libraries in the U.S. have witnessed the impressive growth of acquiring e-books. While publishers, vendors, and librarians are still developing and exploring various models of e-book production, service, and acquisition, we approach issues surrounding e-book adoption, usage, and right restrictions by investigating their end users. In this session, we will report findings from a research project that studies undergraduate students' interests, attitudes, and expectations toward e-books accessible via an academic library website. This research includes a questionnaire survey with both closed and open-ended questions, which was administered to 279 undergraduate students (mostly freshmen and sophomore) in a large university in the South.

Attendees of the session can expect to learn about a range of user-related issues. For example, what functions and features of e-books do students consider most important? What are less important? What DRM restrictions are acceptable or unacceptable to these young college students? What are their experiences of and expectations for using e-books licensed by academic libraries? These issues are interesting to multiple audiences: academic librarians can understand their users better and learn new ways of educating users and promoting the usage of e-books; and publishers and vendors can gain a better knowledge of their end users, which may help them design, develop, and produce information products that are more appropriate for young academic users.

This session is co-authored by Kanchan Deosthali, Assistant Professor, College of Business, University of Mary Washington, and Devendra Potnis, Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee - Knoxville, and Rebecca McCusker, SIS Master's Studennt, University of Tennessee, who were unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Awa Zhu

Awa Zhu

Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
Dr. Xiaohua (Awa) Zhu is an assistant professor at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Zhu's research focuses on e-resources licensing and management, access rights, digital copyright, open government, and academic libraries.


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Emory University/Georgia Tech Shared Collection
Building on the notion of a shared collection, Emory University and Georgia Tech recently opened the Library Service Center, an offsite library housing general and special collections materials from both libraries.

In this session, we will provide the audience with an overview of the complexity of such a project, specifically addressing the following topics: the cultural similarities and differences of Emory and Georgia Tech; composition of the shared collection and how we built it; how we use ExLibris Primo to enable discovery and requesting; governance, financial, management, and staffing models; delivery and ILL services; the inventory control system; physical building design and preservation features; connection to the Scholars Trust initiative; and plans for going forward with a focus on collaborative collection development and possibilities for new partnerships.

The audience will be able to ask questions and be encouraged to share their own experiences with shared collections and shared facilities.

Speakers
JC

Jeff Carrico

Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication and Access, Georgia Tech
LM

Lars Meyer

Director, Content Division, Emory University
CS

Charles Spornick

Director, Services Division, Emory University
I am currently the interim head of the Services Division for the Woodruff Library- Emory's main library.   From 2004 through 2012 I was the head of collection management at Emory; from 1995 through 2004 I was the head of library’s Beck Center.   There he worked with worked with faculty, other libraries, and the campus Information Technology Division ins planning and implementing digitization projects.   My... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Finding the Right Fit for Article Delivery: Using Resource Sharing Technology to Provide Enhanced Access Options
Libraries are struggling to maintain subscriptions to research materials, and must explore a variety of access options. There are few attractive options for libraries who want to provide access to research materials to users in a way that is cost effective and simple for users. Libraries are caught between subscriptions to large packages of content or article-level purchasing that is either not instant or must allow unmediated access. In the past, Resource Sharing and Interlibrary Loan has helped users gain access to research material far beyond what their libraries could afford as a single institution. Going forward, resource sharing can offer a variety of options for libraries to provide users access to research material in a way that is convenient yet cost effective. Using IDS Logic, a resource sharing software platform designed by SUNY Libraries that integrates with vendor web services, more options for access to research materials are available. IDS Logic automates verification of copyright limitations, determines the best price for purchase from article vendors, and creates user profiles and system configuration that will allow more refined and automated purchasing or borrowing of research articles and other content. IDS Logic connects with web services from OCLC, Reprints Desk, Copyright Clearance Center, Pubmed, and others to automate delivery decisions, and provide virtually instant access to needed articles. This creates another method for libraries to meet the research needs of its users and helps to ensure that the research is delivered in the most seamless and cost effective manner.

Speakers
avatar for Shannon Pritting

Shannon Pritting

Library Director, SUNY Polytechnic Institute
Shannon is currently the Library Director at the newly formed SUNY Polytechnic Institute, with sites in Albany and Utica NY. He has held positions in a variety of library areas including Reference, Instruction, Instructional Design, Resource Sharing, and Access Services. He has also worked in a variety of libraries including a Community College, an ARL, a large Liberal Arts college, and a Technical College.



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Getting Selector Buy-in Before the Wrecking Ball Comes
When a new classroom building was approved in late 2014 that would conjoin and extend into Auburn University's Draughon Library, 38,000 square feet of space had to be cleared in a very short time. 400,000 volumes needed to be withdrawn or moved to off-site storage, a move complicated by loss of space in closed stacks due to the installation of a new fire suppression system, promises of a remote storage facility which had yet to be built, no concrete deadlines, and the need to identify and retain materials included in consortial retention agreements.

Space clearing began with a project to remove unneeded duplicate copies which in turn uncovered a multitude of catalog and shelving problems and then evolved into several more projects. All these projects required an extensive time commitment from selectors primarily for input and decision-making skills on titles to be withdrawn or moved to off-site storage. Shifting thousands of books and journals also required manual labor from students, librarians, and staff. None of this would have been possible without buy-in from all library personnel. This presentation details the variety of methods used by Auburn's Collection Team to foster buy-in and keep the project moving toward completion.

Speakers
BB

Barbara Bishop

Collection Team Member, Auburn University Libraries
avatar for Adelia Grabowsky

Adelia Grabowsky

Collection Team Member, Auburn University Libraries
LW

Liza Weisbrod

Collection Team Member, Auburn University Libraries



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Implications of BIBFRAME and Linked Data for Libraries & Publishers

While Linked Data is growing in interest in the library and publishing communities, its evolution and adoption is widespread in many industries. Academic libraries and vendors alike have numerous data silos, incapable of communicating effectively with other repositories and/or the broader web. The library community is rife with outdated business models, in part due to data formats and limitations. New ecosystems and integrations will be borne out of transforming these data silos into the broader and more accessible web of data.

BIBFRAME is the planned replacement for MARC, and while the framework is being evolved in working groups such as LD4P and LC, organizations are already beginning to experiment and deploy new business models around it.  Casalini Libri will share their foray into delivering BIBFRAME resources in addition to MARC records for customers. The transformation has begun.

 The Library.Link Network brings together libraries and their providers to inform the Web of their detailed, vetted and authoritative data about art, music, books/ebooks, special collections and more. MARC records are transformed into BIBFRAME resources, assets linked, and then published in a variety of vocabularies to the web for search engines and other applications to consume.  Users finding library resources on the web or other applications can be driven to the institution’s discovery layer for authentication and fulfillment. 

Due to the highly structured data in the library and publisher worlds, these organizations are well positioned to leverage existing data into the BIBFRAME and/or Linked Data realm. 


Speakers
avatar for Dennis Brunning

Dennis Brunning

Arizona State University
avatar for Michele Casalini

Michele Casalini

CEO, Casalini Libri
Michele Casalini is CEO of the family-run company Casalini Libri, which supplies bibliographical data, books and journals to libraries, and offers e-content through the Torrossa platform, thanks to its dedicated Digital Division. | Following studies in Modern Languages and Literature at the University of Florence, and a period working with the publishing company La Nuova Italia, Michele specialised in the field of Information Technology and... Read More →
avatar for John Richardson

John Richardson

VP of Library & Vendor Partnerships, Zepheira
John Richardson is the Vice President of Library & Vendor Partnerships for Zepheira Technologies (http://zepheira.com) and joined the firm in March 2014. During his 30-year tenure in library automation, he has worked primarily for library automation companies including MultiLIS, Data Research Associates, and Polaris Library Systems. Building on Zepheira’s initial architectural framework on BIBFRAME for the Library of Congress, Zepheira is... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Lifting All Boats: Fostering a Community of Practice for Student Publishers
Undergraduate and graduate students are increasingly being encouraged to work with faculty and researchers to generate traditional scholarship as well as other types of projects that feature original content. Through this process, students are more frequently taking on roles as researchers, authors, and publishers. Student scholarship and student-run publications are valuable to the scholarly record, representing the nascent activities of the next generation of scholars, but also serving as an academic playground for emergent forms of publishing and media. Furthermore, students who manage publications gain practical skills that transfer to a variety of careers in academia and private industry. However, student publications are often struggling and somewhat invisible. They face many of the same sustainability problems affecting the broader publishing industry and unique problems inherent in student publications. These groups frequently need (and often seek) a combination of professional mentorship and a forum for peer group interactions to advance their publishing goals.

At our respective institutions, we continue to be delighted and impressed by the variety and quality of student-generated media, ranging from traditional scholarly journals, to web-based peer-reviewed journals, newspapers, literary, cultural, and political magazines, and more. Libraries, library publishers, and university presses have the expertise and resources needed to help build a community of practice for student publications. Attendees will learn about models for student engagement and library-press collaboration as a librarian, two publishers, and a student editor share their recent experiences and future aspirations in working together to support the vibrant and diverse publications on their campuses.

Speakers
GB

Gillian Berchowitz

Director and Editor-in-Chief, Ohio University Press
MB

Marc Blanc

Founder and Editor-in-Chief, Jettison Magazine, a student-run publication at Ohio University
Marc is an undergraduate in English at Ohio University. In 2015 he helped start Jettison Magazine, an arts and culture publication that remains student-run. Working with university staff and faculty on issues like copyright and distribution, he has developed a sense of what student journals need from academic faculty and facilities.
avatar for Kate Dohe

Kate Dohe

Manager, Digital Programs & Initiatives, University of Maryland Libraries
Kate is the Digital Programs and Initiatives Manager at the University of Maryland Libraries, where her department oversees digital collections, the institutional repository, e-Publishing, research data services, digital preservation, and other digital initiatives. Prior to joining UMD, she was the Digital Services Librarian at Georgetown University, and the digital librarian for an academic textbook publisher in California. She earned her MLISc... Read More →
avatar for Laura Leichum

Laura Leichum

Digital Publishing and Rights Manager, Georgetown University Press
Laura oversees electronic publishing efforts, manages rights and permissions, and pursues co-publications and translations. In general, her job is all about building partnerships and she is interested in exploring the many ways that content creators and publishers such as the GU Press can engage with partners whether on campus, on a national level, or internationally. Prior to her arrival at Georgetown, she was Marketing Manager at... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Mapping the Free Ebook Supply Chain
Although still a small part of overall output, the number of open access (OA) books from scholarly publishers is growing rapidly. Traditional publishers are adding OA options (e.g., Luminos from University of California Press), libraries and funders are collaborating to make existing books OA (e.g., Knowledge Unlatched, NEH/Mellon Humanities Open Book Program), and high quality dedicated OA publishers are emerging (e.g., Lever Press, Open Book Publishers, Ubiquity Press). While many of these works are digital facsimiles of print, an increasing number are multimodal publications with extended functionality. Public availability of scholarly information promotes equity and inclusion and advances some key shared objectives of librarians. However, these titles also present challenges to an information supply chain that relies on commercial intermediaries: There is little incentive for jobbers, aggregators, or booksellers to promote books which have no price; it can be difficult for a library to defend spending collections money on publications that will end up freely available to the world; and new digital scholarship formats can be challenging to deliver to patrons and preserve. In this session, join a publisher, an aggregator of open content, and an expert in information retrieval in a journey past the many obstacles between production of an OA book, its discovery and use by a reader, and its long-term preservation. As well as learning about the issues in this emerging space, participants will be invited to suggest practical ways of overcoming barriers to universal and open access to knowledge.

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Welzenbach

Rebecca Welzenbach

Director of Strategic Integration and Partnerships, Michigan Publishing
University of Michigan

Speakers
avatar for Rupert Gatti

Rupert Gatti

Director, Open Book Publishers
Rupert Gatti is a Fellow and Director of Studies in Economics at Trinity College, Cambridge University. He is a co-founder and Director of the award winning Open Access book publishers, Open Book Publishers (www.openbookpublishers.com).  Founded as a non-profit by scholars at Cambridge in 2008, Open Book Publishers has now published over 80 high quality, rigorously peer reviewed scholarly monographs - including works by well know authors... Read More →
EH

Eric Hellman

Founder, Unglue.it
JO

Jill O'Neill

Educational Programs Manager, NISO



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Preservation of Digital Collections and Dark Archives
Long-term preservation of digital collections is a clear charter for libraries, but the path forward is often murky and daunting. Solutions vary due to collection composition, collection file structure, the technical expertise of the teams involved, and budget. Further, there are issues of stewardship, ownership and release of data in a usable form from dark archives. CLOCKSS, Portico and the Digital Preservation Network will come together at Charleston in a panel presentation to share insights into what it takes for libraries to tackle the issue of long-term preservation. We will discuss case studies and solutions that you can put to work. Come join us as we explore the dark side.

Speakers
CV

Craig Van Dyck

Executive Director, CLOCKSS
Craig Van Dyck is Executive Director of the CLOCKSS Archive, since November 2015. Previously he was with Wiley for 18 years as VP of Content Management; and with Springer New York for 10 years, most recently as Senior VP and COO. | | Craig served as Chairman of the Association of American Publishers Enabling Technologies Committee from 1995-1998, and was instrumental in the development of the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) system and of... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Paolillo

Michelle Paolillo

Digital Curation Services Lead, Cornell University
Michelle is Cornell University's Library's Lead for Digital Curation Services. She is invested in the practical logistics of digital preservation (harmonizing workflows, preservation storage, interoperability, systems design, etc.). She also has duties related to digital humanities, especially in support of computational analysis of text, so OCR quality and computational method are also part of her focus.
avatar for David Pcolar

David Pcolar

CTO, Digital Preservation Network
Dave is the Chief Technology Officer for the Digital Preservation Network and a Technical Manager at Internet2. He is responsible for defining technical strategy and development, and implementation of technical and operational services for DPN.
GS

Greg Suprock

Head of Solutions Architecture, Apex CoVantage
avatar for Jabin White

Jabin White

Vice President, Portico (Ithaka/JSTOR)
Jabin is the Vice President of Content Management at ITHAKA, with responsibility for the production groups of JSTOR and Portico. He enjoys content management, markup languages and all of their related technologies, publishing workflows, and change management. You know, fun stuff like that.



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Quantifying the Impacts of Investment in Humanities Archives
Demonstrating the value of humanities research databases and special collections for researchers on teaching and research outcomes is a known challenge for libraries globally. There is an increasing need for libraries to understand and communicate the research and teaching value of investment in content, as well as the impacts the content can be shown to have on the quality and quantity of research outcomes.

This talk will share the methods, results and implications for libraries and humanities funding bodies of a joint research project recently commissioned by Jisc, the UK higher education, further education and skills sectors' not-for-profit organisation for digital services and solutions, and ProQuest. The presentation will share usage and citation data across a range of disciplines from long term investments in Early English Books Online (EEBO), the House of Commons Parliamentary Papers, and The New York Times.

Conference participants will also be provided with concrete advice on how to undertake similar studies into their own digital resources.

The Oxford Internet Institute (OII) carried out the work using the methodologies OII developed for the Jisc-funded Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources (TIDSR). Quantitative methods of analytics, bibliometrics, and an in-depth survey of researchers were used to build a detailed picture of the use and profile of these resources. This research was complemented by qualitative data gathered through focus groups and individual interviews.

Speakers
avatar for Eric T. Meyer

Eric T. Meyer

Professor of Social Informatics, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
My research looks at the changing nature of knowledge creation in science, medicine, social science, arts, and humanities as technology is embedded in everyday practices.



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Research in the Real World: Accessibility, Nurturing Usage, and Turning Theory into Practice
Academic research—in every field from business and management to medicine and even librarianship—frequently discovers crucial ways to improve efficacy and efficiency. But that only helps if those findings get applied in practice. The research agenda today is increasingly driven by theory at the expense of practical relevance, while employers need the students they recruit to possess a greater blend of skills. The result instead is content published in a form that fails to resonate with practitioners, students, policy makers, and the wider public who want to understand the ROI of the research investment.

In this session, find out how best to get your existing collections used, not just for study, but to inform the real-world decisions of current and former students; how to acquire and market the right resources to get new actionable research into the hands of those who need it; and how to help your faculty get their scholarly publications noticed by the practitioners, consultants, and other influencers who can ensure their discoveries are widely used and understood.

Combining the perspectives of a global publisher leading the way in practitioner-generated content, a university librarian on the front lines of scholarly communication and discovery, and a business school academic with experience in the field, we will create a foundation for extending the reach and impact of novel, new and ground-breaking research into practical application in the real world.

Speakers
avatar for Patti Davis

Patti Davis

Publisher, Emerald Group Publishing
Patti Davis is a Publisher for Emerald Group Publishing, responsible for the journals in the company’s prestigious Operations, Logistics, and Quality Collection. She has more than 15 years of experience both in books and journals publishing, working previously at Rowman & Littlefield Publishers and University Press of America. She has worked in marketing and public relations, as well, most notably at the University of Maryland College Park... Read More →
avatar for Mike Groth

Mike Groth

Marketing Manager: North America, Emerald Group Publishing
Michael Groth is Marketing Manager for North America at Emerald Group Publishing, where he manages all library outreach for the region via digital, social, conference, advertising and PR channels. Mike has spent over 20 years in marketing for scholarly publishing, previously at Ingenta, Publishers Communication Group, the New England Journal of Medicine and Wolters Kluwer. He has attended seemingly countless US library shows, organized... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Ismail

Matthew Ismail

Director of Collection Development, Central Michigan University
Matthew is currently Director of Collection Development at Central Michigan University. He worked at the American University in Sharjah, in the United Arab Emirates, from 1999 to 2006 and at the American University in Cairo, in Cairo, Egypt, from 2006 to 2011. Matthew is on the Editorial Board of Charleston Insights in Library, Archival, and Information Sciences, and is working with Katina Strauch and Tom Gilson on another publishing project... Read More →
TK

Thomas Kent

Professor, College of Charleston



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Seeing that Students Succeed: Rising Expectations and the Library's Role in Teaching and Learning
"Interest in supporting students and their competencies and learning outcomes shows signs of surging." This was one of the most significant findings of Ithaka S+R's latest US Faculty Survey. Other research has found that library directors agree almost unanimously about the importance of their library supporting teaching and learning. In recent years, expectations have increased not only for the library to demonstrate its impact on students but for universities to increase retention, progression, graduation, and later-life outcomes. Ebsco's User Research Group has studied student research practices and the challenges they face, as well as the kinds of librarian-faculty partnerships that are effective in supporting students. This session will share research findings principally from the US, but also from the UK and China, to address the strategic engagements that libraries can make today to contribute directly to student success.

Speakers
KL

Kate Lawrence

Vice President, User Research, EBSCO Information Services
Kate Lawrence has been uncovering customer insights for more than 15 years. She is passionate about learning the “whys” behind everyday mouse clicks, and illuminating the intersection of people and technology. She is the Vice President of User Research at a global information and research services company.
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director, Library and Scholarly Communication Program, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Recently, Roger has led the development of Ithaka S+R’s surveys for individual colleges and universities, to help them better serve the needs of their own faculty members and students. He has also led research and consulting projects on collections... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm

Shotgun Session: Collection Development - Demand Driven Acquisition and E-Book Threads
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1. We used DDA to help build a new engineering collection; you won't believe what happened next 
(Aaron Lupton)

Engineering students want up to date, highly technical information delivered to their devices immediately, so a highly specialized eBook collection is vital for any engineering library. But, engineering eBooks are expensive so "just in case" collection building is not an ideal solution, particularly when building a brand new collection. The introduction of new engineering programs at York University meant new challenges and opportunities for the Libraries, namely building a new collection for these new programs. We started with general eBook packages as well as engineering publisher packages then turned to Demand Driven Acquisition (DDA), Short-Term Loan,  and Evidence Based Selection to fill in the gaps in our current licensed eBook collections. Our goal was to build a quality engineering collection while avoiding the purchase of large numbers of "just in case" print or eBook titles. 

This session will describe how York executed its new Engineering DDA, STL, and Evidence Based Selection programs; how successful these tools were in building a quality collection, as well as the Return on Investment (ROI) of the eBooks selected. The presenters will offer recommendations on how these tools are most effectively integrated with other collection building tools. Just as important, this session will include a discussion on the role of DDA in the traditional collection building process, taking into account that not all eBooks are available via this method, and how DDA can be used to augment a librarian's deeper integration into the engineering curriculum. 
 
2. Rolling with PDA & DDA: How Academic Libraries can use Patron Driven and Demand Driven Acquisition Techniques to Build Library Collections with a Minimal Management & Budget (Kerry Falloon) 

Patron Driven and Demand Driven Acquisitions has been utilized for some time in academic libraries but some university libraries are still new to the process. With changes in the last couple of years regarding short-term monograph loans becoming cost-ineffective, the popularity of streaming video PDA, and library budgets increasingly being cut, the conundrum of successfully implementing a PDA program and how to evaluate its effectiveness, is a question many still library's face. In the Fall of 2015, the College of Staten Island Library-CUNY, implemented a small DDA monograph pilot program with YBP/ EBSCO e-books to build its collections in academic areas new to the college. The goal was to offer patrons immediate "on demand" selections in areas that might need additional collection building in depth and breath, but this will take some to accomplish by collection development librarians. The results of this DDA pilot project, as well as the implementation by the Fall of 2016, of a PDA streaming video program with Kanopy, will be discussed. Both pilot projects were completed with a total budget of $5,000 committed to each. With budget cuts of over a hundred thousand in the year proceeding the implementation of these projects, this poster will discuss "small budget and manageable" PDA and DDA programs, which was in direct contrast to a larger scale CUNY DDA project, which the College of Staten Island (CSI) benefitted from in 2014. The shortfalls of the PDA/ DDA pilot projects, lessons learned, and future prospects at CSI’s library considered will also be discussed.              

3. What's On Demand?: Analyzing Demand-Driven Acquisition of eBooks (Paolo Gujilde, Jessica Minihan)

What happens to DDA ebooks after their initial use? Will they be used again? Does it represent the library collection? The landscape of acquisition models in which libraries negotiate are changing with the times to accommodate the reality of budgetary concerns and providing a traditionally balanced library collection. Academic libraries like ours, Zach S. Henderson Library (Georgia Southern University), which employs demand-driven acquisition must find an equilibrium between needs and wants. The "needs" of funding and the "wants" of having it all just in case. Henderson Library implemented subject-specific DDA electronic books program in 2011 to support online education programs and to supplement the traditional automatic approval plan. Then, in 2015, the Library fully expanded the DDA program to all subject areas as well as print format. These changes marked the move from the traditional automatic approval plan to DDA plan. 

In this presentation, we will trace the Library's DDA ebook usage statistics and generate trends that reveal effectiveness, or lack thereof, of the DDA program specifically as it pertains to electronic books. Attendees of this session will leave with better understanding of issues of collection development and acquisitions as it relates to DDA.  

4. Post-Acquisition Management and the Issue of Inaccessibility (Beth Caruso) 

Though advocates are calling for publishers to develop born-accessible eBooks to comply with ADA and DAISY standards and the EPUB 3.0 measures now backed by the Society for Disability Studies, the realistic timespan for this achievement to become standard practice is far from ideal. To equitably serve users who are differently able, stronger technology and a mindset toward accessibility must become the standard in electronic collections. Librarians are expected to have a strong working knowledge of the library's collections but receive little training in best practices for assisting patrons who are differently able. We cannot wait for the eBook landscape to change on its own, as responses to inaccessibility have largely been that the technology simply was not applied to the desired text. In the meantime, we must recognize  how to develop usable collections for all and how to respond to those whose access has been limited.This research is the product of both current research and earlier findings of the User Experience Research Team from the Mellon-funded Charlotte Initiative project. Though a quick overview of the team's findings thus far will be provided, this session will focus on the accessible eBook landscape and provide librarians with tools to better assist users working independently in discovery systems as they interact with the library's current acquisitions. Additionally, librarians will acquire techniques for responding to users who cannot use the texts they wish and understand how such a mindset can help us develop stronger collections of use to all. 

5.  Open Access, open access, how does your catalog grow? With selection, access, and usage all in a virtual row (David Schuster, Susan Martin)

Much of the Open Access focus and discussion has been on journals (think Glossa). But, the open access monograph has come fully into its own. University and scholarly publishers are providing high quality books, often in areas that rely on long-form scholarship. However, open access monographs present a challenge to libraries of all sizes. How do they fit into the traditional models of selection, acquisition, cataloging, and tracking usage?  

This session will present the open access monograph workflow from selection to usage assessment used at the Texas Woman's University Libraries.  Attendees will learn how a small university library implemented and normalized the workflow for the selection, processing, and usage assessment of open access monographs.

Moderators
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications, UNC Greensboro

Speakers
avatar for Beth Caruso

Beth Caruso

Library Research Assistant & Writing Program Lecturer, UNC Charlotte
Beth Caruso is from New Orleans, but currently lives in Charlotte, NC. Since graduating with an English MA in 2010, she has been teaching First-Year Writing at UNC Charlotte. She has recently given up her administrative position as Associate Director of the UNC Charlotte Writing Resources Center in order to concentrate on library studies. | | She is in her third year of the MLIS program at the University of South Carolina, Columbia... Read More →
avatar for Kerry Falloon

Kerry Falloon

Acquisition Librarian, College of Staten Island- CUNY
With over nine years of experience in academic libraries, my prior positions included Acquisitions & Collection Development librarian at Saint Peter's University, Administrator of Technical Services at Ocean County Community College and currently, Assistant Professor & Acquisitions librarian at the College of Staten Island- CUNY. My research interests include investigating patron driven acquisitions, emerging technologies in libraries, and... Read More →
avatar for Paolo Gujilde

Paolo Gujilde

Coordinator of Collection Development, Georgia Southern University
avatar for Aaron Lupton

Aaron Lupton

Electronic Resources Librarian, York University
I have been the Electronic Resources Librarian at York University in Toronto since 2009. I am involved in negotiating licenses and purchases of all electronic materials in York's collections. I also have an interest in all matters pertaining to assessment, especially collections assessment and measuring student success.
avatar for Susan Martin

Susan Martin

Head, Acquisitions Services, University of Chicago Library
JM

Jessica Minihan

Coordinator of Continuing Resources, Georgia Southern University
avatar for David Schuster

David Schuster

Director of Library Technology and Special Collections, Binghamton University
I've been in library automation for over 20 years and am always looking at ways to bring the best resources to users at the least cost. Susan Martin was a great collaborator as we started to look at how we could "manage" open access monographs in relation to collection management.



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

The Odd Couple: University Libraries and Book Stores Team Up to Reduce Textbook Costs for Students
Since 2012, The University of Arizona (UA) Libraries have partnered with the UA BookStores to identify and make available eBook versions of required course materials, accessible through the campus course management system and the BookStores' website. These eBooks have multi- or unlimited use licenses and are available at no cost to students. In advance of each semester, these two stakeholder groups work in partnership to acquire, make discoverable, and promote this service to faculty and students in a variety of ways.

With the maturity of our partnership and of this service to faculty and students, the UA Libraries are investigating our current environment and working with the UA BookStores to develop a new model that will improve our workflows, processes, and service to our end users, most notably by inserting the Libraries at an earlier stage in the textbook adoption process.

This presentation will focus on both our current process and how we got to this point as well as on our future strategic plans for developing and implementing a new model in collaboration with campus stakeholders.

Our presentation will be useful to both libraries who are thinking of developing a programmatic and collaborative approach to delivering required course materials on their campuses as well as for those who already have a service in place and are looking for fresh ideas and a forum to discuss next steps. We'll present on both external considerations and internal library acquisition processes so that our audience has a full picture of workflows and collaborations.

Speakers
TH

Teresa Hazen

Head of Delivery, Description, and Acquisitions Department, The University of Arizona
NW

Niamh Wallace

Assistant Librarian, Research & Learning Department, The University of Arizona



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm

Worth a Thousand Words: Using Visualizations to Examine Collections Usage
This presentation will explore how the University of Wisconsin-Madison is using tools like Tableau to facilitate the manipulation of large data sets and to develop visualizations that assist in the description and analysis of collections. In this presentation we will discuss how UW has used visualizations to easily tell the story of collections usage to library and campus audiences and how UW is developing tools to assist librarians with collection management decisions. We will trace our process beginning with the assumptions library staff and campus stakeholders make about the use of collections through the formulation of concrete questions, identifying and mapping data points for answering those questions and the subsequent exploration of data sets. The presentation will describe our iterative process for developing and refining visualizations and provide an overview of data processing techniques and tools used. We will also discuss the reaction we have received from inside and outside the library as we shared the presentation of library data.

Speakers
SM

Steve Meyer

Digital Architect, University of Wisconsin-Madison
avatar for Doug Way

Doug Way

AUL for Collections and Research Services, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Doug Way is the associate university librarian for collections and research services at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he provides leadership for the library's collection development and management, resource sharing, and scholarly communications programs. Doug has written and presented extensively on topics related to collection management, shared print, and the future of library collections. He has a bachelor's degree in history... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

Assessing the Books We Didn't Buy (The Sequel)
Three universities (Santa Clara University, the University of San Francisco, Loyola Marymount University) are leveraging patron-initiated borrowing data to inform collection development. Expanding on a pilot project, we have been looking at five years of borrowing data, along with five years of spending data and five years of circulation data of local collections, to help us define what a "normal" level of borrowing looks like as well as identify gaps in local collections. We are also using the data to strengthen the meta-collection of our consortium (LINK+) through the intentional and coordinated diversification of approval plan profiles. We will discuss both methodology and findings to date: how this data is being gathered, analyzed, and then used on our campuses to inform collection development decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Erika Johnson

Erika Johnson

Head of Acquisitions and Collection Management, University of San Francisco
Before joining the University of San Francisco, I was the Electronic Resources Librarian at Boston College. Previous work lives also include Acquisitions & Serials Librarian at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and Program Officer for the American Library Association. I received a B.A. in French and International Relations from UW - Madison and my MLIS from UW - Milwaukee. My current interests include investigating new liaison... Read More →
avatar for Glenn Johnson-Grau

Glenn Johnson-Grau

Head of Acquisitions & Collection Development, Loyola Marymount University
Glenn Johnson-Grau is Head of Collection Development at Loyola Marymount University. He frequently reminds himself that all is flux and nothing stays still.
RM

Rice Majors

Associate University Librarian, Santa Clara University



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

Best Practices for Building Data Collections
Is your library asked to buy data? The conversation around Research Data Management largely focuses on preserving researchers' data output, but libraries also have an important role to play earlier in the data life cycle to help researchers discover and acquire data of all kinds. Many data sets are available for purchase and the library provides a service to the organization by purchasing and making data available to support research.

In this presentation an E-acquisitions Librarian, a Data Librarian and a Social Sciences Subject Librarian will offer best practices for developing data collections in libraries, considering questions of scope, use, hosting, access, and licensing. Time and money are limited, making it important to make data collection development decisions wisely. There are different types of data that libraries can buy, including geospatial, numeric, qualitative, and social media, to name a few. Each type requires thought and planning to make available to researchers. Licensing commercially available data sets can be particularly challenging and we will share what we have learned over the years as we built our data collections and initiated a patron demand driven data program. We will also discuss the ongoing debate over who should build data collections: the subject specialist or data librarian?

Speakers
avatar for Sara Bahnmaier

Sara Bahnmaier

Head, Electronic Resources Acquisitions & Licensing, University of Michigan
avatar for Mara Blake

Mara Blake

Spatial and Numeric Data Librarian, University of Michigan
As a spatial and numeric data library, I work on building our library collections of geospatial data and providing better discoverability and access to the collection. I also work with researchers using numeric, qualitative, and geospatial data technologies in their research and teaching.
avatar for Catherine Morse

Catherine Morse

Government Information, Law and Political Science Librarian, University of Michigan


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Change It Up: Growing your Career in a Wildly Different Organization
Take your professional development to the next level, curb burnout, and seize new possibilities with a move to a wildly different organization. Join us for a session on growing your career "up" or "out" by transitioning to a different size or type of organization.

The presenters have worked in academic libraries (large and small, public and private); for library vendors; and in public libraries of varying sizes. Hear their perspectives on the opportunities, surprises, and lessons learned in changing up their work environs.

Objectives:


  • Identify opportunities for professional growth that a change in organizational type, structure, and size can provide. 

  • Determine whether you, too, can spur renewed growth in your professional development/career in a wildly different type library. 

  • Better evaluate the qualifications of applicants with experience in a much different setting.


Speakers
avatar for Betsy Appleton

Betsy Appleton

Electronic and Continuing Resources Librarian, St. Edward's University
Betsy Appleton is interested in electronic resource management, scholarly communication, licensing, and collection development.
avatar for Tina Buck

Tina Buck

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Central Florida
Tina is an electronic resources librarian, combining her background in acquisitions, cataloging, the ILS, and all things tech services with e-resource management.
avatar for Carol Seiler

Carol Seiler

Account Services Manager, EBSCO
Carol Seiler has an MLS from Texas Woman’s University, earned at a time when the internet was young and the web barely existed. She started her career in libraries as a cataloger and now has worked in almost all areas of the library. She has primarily worked as an academic/medical librarian but did time as a public librarian as well as a Trainer for All Things Technical Services for a consortia. Carol has been with EBSCO Information Services... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

Developing eBook Purchasing Guidelines
In 2014, Cooperating Libraries in Consortium (CLIC), a consortium of seven libraries in the Twin Cities, tasked its Collection Development Committee with starting concerted efforts to cooperatively acquire ebooks for the consortium. To that end, the group developed a philosophy and a set of purchasing and renewal review guidelines that have so far proven very helpful to fairly and fully evaluate possible purchases and make efficient purchasing decisions. The group conducted considerable research on other consortium models, as well as the myriad purchase model options available from various vendors.

Our proposed presentation would detail our efforts so that other libraries can learn from our research as well as consider using our selection and evaluation model for their own library or consortium. While we would speak to the consortium-specific aspects of ebook acquisition, we would also talk at some length about factors that are relevant for both consortia and individual libraries. Outcomes of this project included detailed checklists for acquiring new ebook packages and evaluating existing ones, which we would describe and make available to other libraries.

The four presenters would cover the goals of our project, as charged from our consortium board, challenges we faced adapting our processes from the print to the electronic realm, the many vendor models that we evaluated, and the criteria we developed to make purchasing decisions. We will also cover how we aligned our consortium members in order to purchase ebooks cooperatively, and offer advice to others on how to handle this process with colleagues at their library or consortium.

Speakers
avatar for Rhonda Gilbraith

Rhonda Gilbraith

Associate Director and Collection Development Librarian, Bethel University, St. Paul, MN
I am Associate Director and Collection Development Librarian at Bethel University, in St. Paul, MN. I began my library career in ILL, moving into Reference, and, eventually, Collection Management. I have served as liaison to a variety of disciplines over the years, and continue in that capacity for Bethel's Education Doctorate Program. I love spending time with my librarian husband, walking my dog, eating out, taking in the wonderful theater... Read More →
avatar for Meg Manahan

Meg Manahan

Associate Director, Collection Management & Services, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Effective Methods for Library Assessment
Assessment is crucial to ensure libraries meet the needs of their patrons and to show ROI on the libraries' collection investments. But what measurements are librarians taking to answer these questions and how are they collecting data? How is the data being presented and to whom? A panel of Assessment Librarians discusses the methods they use and share practical ideas for librarians tasked with measuring usage, cost-per-download, LibGuide views, web behavior, and other stats in their libraries. Learn from your colleagues about new initiatives like custom in-house databases for tracking Journals usage or a study of two years'-worth of reference transactions looking at time of day, the questions asked, and the level of questions asked based on the READ scale. Attendees will come away with actionable ideas on using statistics to show the value of the library.

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Gilmore

Tracy Gilmore

Collections Assessment Librarian, Virginia Tech
Tracy Gilmore is the Collections Assessment Librarian at Virginia Tech University Libraries. She coordinates assessment activities and strategies for developing the library’s digital collections. Her current research interests include discovery service usability, usage, and access.
avatar for Rachel Kirk

Rachel Kirk

Professor, Assessment Librarian, Middle Tennessee State University
avatar for Elisabeth Leonard

Elisabeth Leonard

Senior Field Editor, SAGE Publications
AT

Angie Thorpe

Digital User Experience Librarian, Indiana University Kokomo


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Extreme Makeover: How We Decreased our Collection by 40% and Increased it by 50% in 10 Months
How We Decreased our Collection by 40% and Simultaneously Increased it by 50% in 10 Months!
(What?! How is that possible?!)

The Brennan Library at Lasell College had not conducted a systematic weeding in over 20 years. With space in demand, and the increase in online courses, desperate times called for drastic measures. Over a 10-month period the Library withdrew 40% of it's tangible collections. Simultaneously, the staff's focus shifted to promoting e-resources, and adopting the EBSCO EDS discovery layer. Using a weighted collection development allocation formula, the Librarians overhauled the materials budget and designed a departmental liaison program. Factoring in new e-book and streaming video collections, the Library's collection increased by 50% in spite of the massive withdrawals. This session aims to tell an encouraging story of a small academic library with limited funds and staffing that made extreme changes and saved itself from negative perceptions and imposing threats. Attendees will learn about practical ways to crunch numbers and visualize data in order to impress stakeholders. The Brennan Library added seating, zoned areas, and in-demand e-resources for a growing distance-learner population. By changing the collection development policy from "just in case" to "just in time," the Library now provides access to more items than ever before in the college's history. The endeavor involved creative thinking, and attendees may seek advice on how to strategize and make major changes in their own organizations. An access over ownership model gives small libraries the best bang for the buck and a recipe for success, provided that significant changes are communicated in a positive, exciting manner, and the Brennan Library's "makeover" proves it.

Speakers
DH

Del Hornbuckle

Director, Brennan Library, Lasell College
avatar for Lydia Sampson

Lydia Sampson

Head of Technical Services, Brennan Library, Lasell College
Over the past year I've gotten a crash course in discovery systems, electronic resources management, and quantitative tools for collection assessment. Last year was my first Charleston Conference and I got SO MUCH out of it! Come see my presentation on Thursday about our EXTREME MAKEOVER in which we downsized our library's collection by 40%... yet increased our collections by 50% using e-resources! Our 19th Century Library joined the 21st Century... Read More →
AT

Amy Thurlow

Regional Sales Manager, Academic Libraries - MA, RI, VT, EBSCO Information Services


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

Improving Student Success: Arkansas State's Partnership with Credo and Regional High Schools
Are new students coming to your university ready to succeed or are they being overwhelmed by the college experience? Do faculty complain that they spend more time, with increasing frustration, providing basic research instruction to new students? Is your institution being challenged to increase 1st and 2nd year retention rates? In this "Out of the Box" session, two librarians from Arkansas State University (A-State) and Credo's Chief Content Officer will discuss their innovative collaboration in which A-State and Credo are working together to bring information literacy resources and instruction to local high schools in support of college readiness.

This session will cover a number of issues, including how the library engaged and garnered administration support, the challenge in establishing meaningful partnerships with local high schools, and developing and tracking the right metrics to validate progress. Topics of discussion will include ways in which the library can do more to enhance its strategic importance relative to administration goals; an overview of the established goals and how success will be tracked in areas including college preparedness, retention, graduation rates, GPA, and recruiting; and why this matters to the A-State Library. Participants of the session who have in place, or are trying to develop, similar programs will be encouraged to share their experiences and everyone is welcomed to provide feedback on the established goals.
Participants will gain new ideas on how to deepen faculty, administration, and community engagement while preparing students for college success, even before they arrive on a college campus.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Bailey

Jeff Bailey

Library Director, Arkansas State University
A native of Dayton, Ohio, Jeff Bailey was appointed Director of the Dean B. Ellis Library of Arkansas State University in 2012 after leading the library for three years in an interim capacity.  In his academic library career, Jeff has held positions in both public and technical services, including several years leading collection development at Arkansas State.  Jeff received his MSLS from Clarion University of Pennsylvania when online searching... Read More →
avatar for April Sheppard

April Sheppard

Assistant Library Director, Arkansas State University
Anything and everything! From library outreach and research to heavy metal and horror movies!
IS

Ian Singer

Chief Content Officer, Credo



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Making Visible Changing Scholarship in the Humanities
Scholars in the digital humanities produce work that breaks the constraints of the printed page--the monograph's traditional form--and University Presses and University Libraries are adapting their practices to meet the changing publication needs of these scholars and their research. Encouraged by the Mellon Foundation, in particular, Presses and Libraries are experimenting with various ways to meet the needs of these scholars. Anthony Watkinson, Honorary Lecturer in the Department of Information Studies at University College London will set the scene. Rebecca Welzenbach, Director of Strategic Integration and Partnerships at Michigan Publishing, will describe efforts underway at Michigan Publishing to ensure that new forms of digital scholarship are discoverable, durable, and recognizable as high-quality scholarship alongside more traditional products, focusing on initiatives including Lever Press, the Mellon-funded Fulcrum publishing platform, and the Mellon-funded Mapping the Free eBook Supply Chain research project. Susan Doerr, Assistant Director and Digital Publishing and Operations Director at the University of Minnesota Press, will turn our perspective inside a university press with a discussion of Minnesota's efforts, in collaboration with CUNY's Graduate Center Digital Scholarship Lab, to makes visible the process of a book's creation though Manifold, a Mellon-funded iterative publishing platform that seeks to transform monographs from static print forms into web-based dynamic digital publications. Our intention is to reach out to publishers and librarians in the context of considerable international interest, for example in UNESCO, in recognising the validity of non-traditional scholarly outputs. It is an area where these speakers and their institutions are at the cutting edge.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Doerr

Susan Doerr

Assistant Director, Digital Publishing and Operations Director, University of Minnesota Press
Susan Doerr manages the business office at the University of Minnesota Press and has been a part of Minnesota's digital publishing program since its inception. Susan is the Treasurer of the Association of American University Presses. Prior to joining the University of Minnesota Press, Susan held roles at at Consortium Book Sales & Distribution, Personnel Decisions International, and Milkweed Editions.
avatar for Anthony  Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research
Anthony Watkinson is the Principal Consultant at CIBER Research and is an associate of Oxford Brookes University and an honorary lecturer at University College London. For publications see the Ciber site. He is a director of the Charleston Conference, a member of the editorial board of the Charleston Advisor and co-organiser of the Fiesole Retreats. He also consults for the Publishers Association and organises events and writes for the... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Welzenbach

Rebecca Welzenbach

Director of Strategic Integration and Partnerships, Michigan Publishing
University of Michigan



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

Moving Beyond COUNTER: Assessing User Engagement with Streaming Video
Representatives from Alexander Street Press, Films on Demand, and Kanopy will discuss how their platforms capture and assess faculty and student engagement with streaming video in the classroom and beyond. Can librarians help in capturing engagement data? This librarian-moderated panel will offer an opportunity for attendees to discuss how streaming video platforms can provide enhanced assessment of users' interaction with video content in future releases.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah E. McCleskey

Sarah E. McCleskey

Head of Access Services, Hofstra University Library
Copyright, resource sharing, streaming video, weeding, collection analysis

Speakers
avatar for Andrea  Eastman-Mullins

Andrea Eastman-Mullins

Chief Operating Officer, Alexander Street
avatar for Tom Humphrey

Tom Humphrey

COO, Kanopy
avatar for Doug Mingle

Doug Mingle

Director of Sales - Academic Division, Films Media Group, an Infobase Company



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Project Management Office to the Rescue: Aligning Workforce and Resources with Library Vision and Delivering Results
Many libraries today are inundated with increasing number of tasks, projects, and initiatives through which they hope to achieve their mission and strategic vision only to find themselves losing focus and drowning in the volume of work. Hesburgh Libraries at the University of Notre Dame struggled with absorbing an exponentially growing number of projects and aligning them with institutional strategic initiatives and goals. The increasing number of projects and the relatively stable size of the workforce significantly impacted the institution's ability to complete projects in a timely fashion and within the budgetary allocation.

In October 2015, the Project Management Office (PMO) was formed. Four dedicated employees were reassigned from their previous responsibilities to manage PMO portfolios and help the Libraries lead and complete projects, as well as assist with prioritization of continuously incoming project requests. PMO's objectives include coordination of projects in the areas of IT, Technical Services and fostering of selected library strategic initiatives. Since PMO's formation, the Libraries have seen meaningful transformation in stewardship of resources and increase in accountability for delivering results.

This presentation will describe the idea behind PMO formation; our internal process for vetting and prioritizing project requests; approaches and tools we use to organize, manage, and document approved projects; and our goals for the future as PMO continues to mature and develop.

Speakers
avatar for Anastasia (Nastia)  Guimaraes

Anastasia (Nastia) Guimaraes

Project Management Librarian, University of Notre Dame
A former unit head in Technical Services, over the last year Nastia has been working as a Project Management Librarian in a newly formed PMO at Hesburgh Libraries, University of Notre Dame. Some of her responsibilities include managing scheduling, coordinating work of project teams, sharing communication, creating documentation, and being a cheerleader. | | A native speaker of Russian, Nastia holds a BA in English and Spanish from Moscow... Read More →
avatar for Zheng (John) Wang

Zheng (John) Wang

Associate University Librarian, Digital Access, Resources and Information Technology, University of Notre Dame
John oversees three programs, Information Technology and Discovery Services, Resource Acquisitions and Delivery Services, and Digital Initiatives and Scholarship: | *Provide Leadership and Vision by playing a leading role in library-wide strategic planning, resource management, and assessment and helping to develop and convey a clear and compelling vision; | *Closely align goals, structure, resources and values with those of the University... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Rolling On or Getting Rolled Over? Introducing New Functional Specializations in Academic Libraries
In 2000, Wilder identified the most significant shift in the hiring practices of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) as "the growth of the job category 'functional specialist' (p. 4), defined by ARL as 'media specialists or...experts in management fields such as personnel, fiscal matters, systems, preservation, etc." (ibid.) This trend continues today. According to Sierra's (2012) review of jobs posted by ARL member libraries in 2011, two thirds of functional specialist positions were newly created or redefined.

Functional specialist librarians confront unique challenges. These positions are often "one-person shops" in which the function in question is performed by a very small staff, limiting in-house training and mentoring opportunities. Furthermore, the work of individual functional specialist positions differs significantly from specialization to specialization. While a newly-minted Cataloging Librarian would likely have the opportunity to be trained and guided by another professional librarian in their home library, a Digital Humanities specialist's work and training, for example, differs significantly from that of an Assessment Librarian. How, then, do individual functional specializations develop as sub-professions of academic librarianship?
This presentation will discuss and compare findings from large-scale surveys of librarians in two areas of specialization: Electronic Resources Management and Assessment. Attendees will learn about similarities and differences in the practices and concerns of librarians in the two groups, and how members of each group acquired the skills and knowledge required of their specializations. Attendees will be asked to share their own experiences as functional specialists to inform each other and future research efforts.

Speakers
RF

Rachel Fleming-May

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences; University of Tennessee
Rachel Fleming-May is an Associate Professor in the University of Tennessee’s School of Information Sciences. Her research and teaching interests include assessment, academic librarianship, and the intersection of creative writing and information
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Licensing Program Strategist, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Licensing Program Strategist with LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources librarian at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.
RM

Regina Mays

Assistant Professor/Assessment Librarian, University of Tennessee Libraries


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Rolling Out the Shared Print Collection: Technology, Policy, Logistics, History
Shared collections promise access to more diverse and comprehensive holdings at a more sustainable cost as well as better documentation and preservation support for the volumes in the collection. Achieving the goals of shared collections requires new approaches to the discovery, storage, bibliographic documentation, and delivery of library materials. Panelists are key voices in projects that seek to realize the potential for a more nationally unified structure for collections and the resource-sharing, preservation, and digitization services related to them. They will describe:



  • new technologies and operations management strategies that enable libraries to transform their user services and reduce the costs of collection management;

  • recent studies on the potential costs of establishing a national repository system for print materials;

  • the roles and requirements of service and archival monograph collections; and

  • how the experience of the Center for Research Libraries and the Print Archive Network (PAN) can guide the development of a nationally integrated collection.



This session brings together an impressive range of experience—from major research libraries (ReCAP) and regional partnerships (WEST), to the nation-wide HathiTrust print monograph program and the collectively built and maintained collections led by the Center for Research Libraries, to global operations and innovative business practices (Iron Mountain). Informed by the work of OCLC Research and 10 years of Print Archive Network forums, these projects seek to radically transform our collective ability to provide access to truly comprehensive research collections.

Moderators
JN

Jacob Nadal

Executive Director of the Research Collections and Preservation Consortium, Princeton University

Speakers
ES

Emily Stambaugh

UC Shared Print Manager, California Digital Library
avatar for Jeremy Suratt

Jeremy Suratt

Director of Product Management, Library Services, Iron Mountain
I am working Librarians and Archivists to understand their need and willingness to use Iron Mountain services to manage their collections.
MW

Marie Waltz

Special Projects Manager, Center for Research Libraries
I am currently involved in several of the Center for Research Libraries (CRL) print archive initiatives. I coordinate the PAN meeting, held at ALA on Friday morning, work with other CRL staff on the PAPR database and manage the JSTOR print archive.



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

Shotgun Session: End Users/Use Statistics and Technology/Trends Threads

These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks. 

1. Usage Analysis of Print Serials: Are They Worth the Investment? (Rob Kairis)

Although part of a larger 8-campus university library system and a member of OhioLINK, a large consortium of academic libraries in Ohio, the Stark Campus Library of Kent State University maintains a modest collection of print serial subscriptions. The library has analyzed usage of both current and bound issues for many years. Cost per use analysis for each subscription suggests the overall collection is not worth the investment. The presentation will include a description of how usage of the collection is collected and measured. Participants are encouraged to share their experiences as more and more content becomes available electronically. Staffing issues (the library's Serials Librarian retired last year and was not replaced) along with political challenges will also be introduced; The Stark Campus contracts for library services with a collocated community college and manages its print serials collection. Due to the need for more classroom space on campus, print serials have been impacted more than any other library collection, making the storage of print serials an on-going problem. Alternate methods to maintaining a print serials collection, such as an online-only collection or sole reliance on on-demand document delivery, will be discussed. Based on conclusions drawn from this analysis, a comprehensive new model for continuing to subscribe to print serials will be introduced. 

2. Faculty Are Doin' It for Themselves: Librarians Show Them How (CJ Ivory)

The battle over textbook affordability continues to be waged on college campuses across the nation and in state legislatures.  Florida has even passed legislation requiring colleges and universities to reduce the costs of textbooks. University of Central Florida College of Business preemptively introduced the new Integrated Business program. This new program has nine core classes that uses a flipped classroom approach. One of the mandates of the program is to develop a curriculum with minimal additional costs to the students. The solution was to design courses without using traditional textbooks as the basis for the curriculum. I saw this as an opportunity to market library resources and promote our new role as course content curators. I worked with faculty to integrate library resources as they developed new courses. After two semesters of instruction, I surveyed the faculty to learn how satisfied they were with the available resources and how I can improve my services as content curator for their courses. During this presentation, I will share the results of the survey and provide tips on how to help faculty build courses that are rigorous as well as affordable using library resources. I will also discuss how this new role has affected my choices as a subject selector.  

3. The 5 C's Related to Rolling Out an Effective Scientific Authoring & Publishing Platform: Collaboration, Creativity, Customization, Centralization, & Compliance (Shelly Miller)

Today’s global collaborative scientific research developments offer libraries the opportunity to create a scientific authoring and publishing platform that reflects the nature and needs of the campus community. To effectively support authorship best practices and facilitate knowledge sharing, this presentation aims to inspire collaboration and offer insight regarding the challenges and opportunities encountered by libraries as they work to roll out new technologies and solutions that support, accelerate and improve the quality of research publications while minimizing the management footprint.

The Caltech Library has responded to such challenges and opportunities with an ‘Author Carpentry’ initiative that provides customized, centralized access to authoring tools and services, high quality training and user support for their researchers, students, faculty and staff. Overleaf has collaborated with The Caltech Library to develop a customized LaTeX scientific authoring portal that supports the entire campus community and is an essential component of the Caltech Author Carpentry program. This presentation will highlight the main components of an effective roll-out and current use of the innovative Overleaf-Caltech scientific authoring portal, including: easy sign-up, teaching tools, enhanced thesis templates with Caltech-approved information, featured journal templates and real-time administrative dashboard for the library to monitor data and analytics.

4. Scholars Trust Cooperative Journal Retention Update (Lars Meyer)

The Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL) launched its shared print journal program in 2010 with 15 libraries participating.  In January 2013, the Washington Research Library Consortium (WRLC) signed an agreement to combine their print journal archives with ASERL under a single retention and access agreement called "Scholars Trust." The Florida Academic Repository (FLARE), a statewide shared collection, is also now participating in the program.  A total of 38 libraries are contributing content to Scholars Trust for a combined collection of circa 20,000 unique ISSNs representing over 300,000 volumes.  The participating libraries and consortia are collaborating to maintain legacy print collections into the future, allowing for the possibility of deduplicating local collections.  I will provide an overview of governance and participation; benefits to libraries, including a priority reciprocal ILL program; libraries' use of the Journal Retention and Needs Listing (JRNL) database and Local Holdings Records to share information, especially for identifying gaps; and how Scholars Trust relates to similar print preservation efforts in North America, such as the CIC Shared Print Repository and the Western Regional Storage Trust.  I will conclude with some thoughts about why libraries should consider participating in consortial print preservation efforts. 

Moderators
avatar for David Myers

David Myers

CEO, DMedia Associates
David Myers, President and CEO of DMedia Associates, Inc., is an Information Industry expert, with over 24 years experience specializing in Strategy, Sales, Licensing and Business Development. Throughout his career, he has drafted, negotiated and closed over 500 domestic and international licensing agreements with publishing partners, customers and distributors.

Speakers
CI

CJ Ivory

Business Librarian, University of Central Florida
avatar for Rob Kairis

Rob Kairis

Library Director, Kent State University, Stark Campus
My interests include: Cooperative Collection Development, Library Approval Plans, Plagiarism, Academic Honesty, Information Literacy.
LM

Lars Meyer

Director, Content Division, Emory University
avatar for Shelly Miller

Shelly Miller

Sales & Academic Outreach Manager, Overleaf
Collaborative scientific research, authoring and publishing



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Stay Calm and Cover Your ASSessment: Creating a Culture of Assessment on a Shoestring
One of the academic initiatives of our time is student success; therefore, a library mission that contributes to the academic success of students is a necessity. While academic libraries routinely engage in assessment for a variety of reasons such as improving processes, responding to customer needs, and reporting accreditation requirements, many academic libraries are being required to prove the value of the library to the institution by contributing to the academic success of its students.
Assessment is no longer a choice for libraries, it has become an expectation. Although most libraries are already doing some assessment, there is little effort to build a culture of assessment where staff understand and fully engage in the process. In many organizations, assessment is often initiated and driven by library administration. Despite good intentions, many initiatives ultimately fail due to lack of staff buy-in.
How can assessment become a library-wide initiative in which everyone participates with shared, common goals? What strategies can be used to promote a culture of assessment?
By the end of this session attendees will be able to formulate ideas of how to develop a library-wide culture of assessment and create a toolkit that supports the development of essential skill sets required to support this initiative. Poll Everywhere, Q & A, and discussion will engage attendees.

Speakers
avatar for Audrey Powers

Audrey Powers

Associate Librarian, College of the Arts, University of South Florida
I am an Associate Librarian at the University of South Florida. Currently, I work with students and faculty in The College of The Arts, but in my former life I was a Science librarian. These very different roles have provided me with the unique opportunity to work with researchers, faculty and students who are intriguing and dedicated to the disciplines they are engaged in. | | As a Charleston Conference Director I collaborate with other... Read More →
avatar for Susan Silver

Susan Silver

Associate Librarian, Social Sciences Librarian, University of South Florida
I am the social sciences librarian at the University of South Florida Tampa Library. I teaches information literacy skills to undergraduate and graduate students and develop and maintain collections for several areas within the social sciences. My research focuses primarily on the impact of technology on academic libraries, specifically the intersection of information literacy and computer-aided library instruction. Other research interests are... Read More →
avatar for Matt Torrence

Matt Torrence

Associate Librarian, STEM Librarian, University of South Florida
I currently serve as the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics) Librarian at the University of South Florida, Tampa Library. Along with the rest of the library professionals and subject specialists, I provide information expertise to students and faculty, with a special focus on the research needs of the clients and colleagues from topics related to business and technology. I work extensively in evaluating the resource... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Technological, Organizational, and Cultural Transformation of Technical Services and Collection Development
West Virginia University Libraries migrated to a new ILS and reorganized technical services during FY 2015-16. These technological and organizational changes transformed technical service operations, especially ordering receiving workflows, which led to cultural changes throughout technical services and in collection development activities.

In addition to the myriad incremental changes that normal tech service operations face, WVU experienced the technological and organizational transformation that arose out of moving to a next gen ILS in a networked community system, resulting in the merging of copy cataloging activities with acquisitions. This had a significant impact on print ordering and receiving operations. Additionally, loading of MARC records for electronic resources was replaced by simply maintaining the new knowledge base, which is fully integrated with the new discovery system.

Following on the heels of these changes, cultural changes have filtered throughout the unit and collaborations with subject liaisons. The new organizational structure, reporting lines and duties in a new system have led to more participation, collaboration, and accountability within technical services. External to the unit, collection development has shifted to allocations by college and subject, allowing librarians to have larger input to resources in their areas.

The objectives of this session are to increase attendees' understanding of: 


  1. the difference between incremental and transformational change 

  2. the various drivers for transformational change, and 

  3. how to prepare for, continue through, and move past large changes that affect technology, organization, and culture. 


Audience will participate in polls in order to compare with other organizations.

Speakers
JW

Janetta Waterhouse

Director, Knowledge Access & Resource Management, West Virginia Unversity


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

The Future of Discovery - Hyperknowledge
The volume of data and different formats (text, video, images) today is overwhelming, and traditional search, while brilliant for 'known item searching', does not perform well around 'conceptual search'
In this presentation we will explain how next generation technology can help deal with fragmented information in multiple formats and to help make sense of this for researchers, and more importantly, how it can help people find connections that they didn't even know to look for
The audience will be invited to review some real case studies across different areas of how the new technology (hyperknowledge) has helped drive research forward in various domains and also how it's driving up standards in teaching environments
The audience will learn about the potential of this groundbreaking new technology which changes how research is conducted, and how research communities and individuals can engage and work together.

Speakers
RG

Ruggero Gramatica

CEO, Yewno Inc
MA

Michael A. Keller

Vice Provost and University Librarian, Stanford University
Vice Provost, University Librarian, Publisher | Stanford University


Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

The Librarian's Survival Guide to the 'Big Deal': Tools for Unbundling
In 2016, the Canadian loonie fell to 77% of the U.S. dollar, creating unexpected financial challenges for collections management. Examining usage statistics was the clear first place to start when evaluating resources for cancellation - but would data-driven decisions based purely on cost per use be adequate?

In this joint presentation by Western University and EBSCO Information Services, we will look beyond cost per use, and focus on how Western built on the "big deal" analysis work initiated by the University de Montreal, adding a journal overlap analysis and home-grown method of performing citation analysis using Web of Science and Scopus to determine where university researchers and their collaborators are publishing. Early results from selected publisher packages show that Western is able to save nearly half the "big deal" sticker price with minimal impact to researchers and students.

We will also discuss our collaborative work with other Canadian universities through the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) and the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN). EBSCO Information Services will demonstrate how they helped inform this process by providing title cost and usage data.

The interactive session will involve the audience through discussions about their own collection assessment challenges and triumphs. Attendees will leave with new ideas, questions to consider, and practical tools to help experiment with unbundling their own "big deals."

This session was co-authored by Alie Visser, Research & Instructional Services Librarian, Western University, who was unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Cassady

Samuel Cassady

Digital Information Resources Librarian, Western University
avatar for Doug Lynch

Doug Lynch

VP Sales, Subscription Services/YBP, EBSCO Information Services
LO

Leanne Olson

Metadata Management Librarian, Western University



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

The Road Ahead? Patron-Driven Acquisition Might Become...
Library patrons make use of many forms of content: journals, ebooks, videos, audio tracks, archival documents, musical scores, etc. Each of these content types is amenable to PDA and the technology certainly exists to deliver each of these content types in PDA. So what stands in the way? We consider the prospects for a future-state of PDA that is multimedia, universal in its publisher/provider inclusion and delivered in an "e-commerce," if you will, environment where the content providers and the library can engage in negotiated agreement on item subscription charges and the trigger to purchase, rather than these being set by the aggregator.

In this panel we will explore three trends propelling us toward this future state and three trends hindering this future state, and will solicit feedback from participants as to other trends we may have missed.

Propelling:
1. Continually tightening library budgets
2. Gradual emergence of affordable, patron-driven models like ReadCube
3. Decreasing demonstrable value of "commodity collections," especially in print and especially in research libraries, moving us towards digitization of rare and unique collections for consumption on demand

Hindering:
1. The emergence of a standard for a platform
2. Flexible terms on triggers and prices
3. Strong cultur of "institutional ownership" and collection building in libraries

Speakers
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →
avatar for David Parker

David Parker

VP, Editorial & Licensing, Alexander Street a ProQuest Company
David Parker is VP Editorial and Licensing for Alexander Street – the leading provider of video, multi-media databases and unique, curated content to the global university library market. Prior to his role with Alexander Street, David founded Business Expert Press and served as the President of Business Expert Press and its sister company, Momentum Press. BEP and MP specialize in applied, concise ebooks for advanced business and engineering... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:35pm

We're on a Roll: Transforming E-Book Acquisitions in a Shifting Budget Landscape
In response to the challenging budget landscape in 2015/16, the University of British Columbia Library took a new approach to e-book acquisitions. The Associate University Librarian, Collections, established a working group with a mandate to develop and implement a strategy for library-wide e-book purchasing. Members of the group were drawn from both campuses and represented public and technical services and a broad spectrum of disciplines.

In this presentation, we will briefly review the factors that led to the formation of the working group, then discuss the steps taken in the analysis, selection, and purchase of e-books. The committee's two-pronged approach - the purchase of large ebook packages and participation in evidence-based acquisitions programs with Cambridge, Wiley, Taylor & Francis, and CRC Press - will be explored in depth.

We will highlight the benefits of cross-unit collaboration, the vendor and publisher relations, and the effective use of limited funds. We will discuss the many challenges around discovery and access, evaluation and decision-making, and transitioning the program into the current fiscal year.

We expect that our presentation will contribute to the broader picture of how large academic libraries can address rising costs, limited budgets, and the variety of publisher e-book offers.

Speakers
avatar for Sheldon Armstrong

Sheldon Armstrong

Interim AUL Collections, University of British Columbia
I am currently the Interim AUL Collection at the UBC Library located on the Vancouver campus. I have many years of experience in licensing, budgeting and publisher negotiations - but am most interested in where we should be heading in the long term. I am eagerly waiting our industry's "disruptive technology" that sets us all on our ears!
avatar for Arielle Lomness

Arielle Lomness

Collections Librarian, University of British Columbia - Okanagan
Arielle is currently responsible for coordinating the UBC Library's Okanagan campus collections activities, including acquisitions, renewals, and cancellations. Along with the Library's Vancouver campus, she has been participating in leading e-book evidence-based and package acquisitions programs. Additional responsibilities include overseeing book and other material donations to the Library. | | Arielle’s research interests include... Read More →
avatar for Sally Taylor

Sally Taylor

Science Librarian, University of British Columbia
Sally Taylor is a science librarian on the UBC Vancouver campus. In addition to providing liaison and instruction for the biological sciences, fisheries and forestry, she is part of a 3-person collections team at Woodward Library where she takes a lead role on monograph acquisitions, donations and collection moves. Sally also co-chairs the ebooks working group that is responsible for purchasing ebook packages and managing the evidence-based... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:35pm

Why We Blog - Reshaping Research, Captivating Tales from Academic Bloggers
Hear firsthand from ACI Scholarly Blog Index authors, leading academics in their field, on why they blog and the value and importance blogging plays in their academic role and scholarly communication. Blogging and microblogging enable new forms of interaction between authors and their readers. The next generation of college students are Internet savvy, but not all are information literate. How do faculty and librarians bridge students' information gaps and teach them information skills, beyond tweeting and texting, to think critically and be successful? Scholarly blogs are part of the solution and an aid to reshaping approaches to research. Panelists share background stories and insights on academic blogging.

Moderators
avatar for Pat Sabosik

Pat Sabosik

General Manager, ACI Scholarly Blog Index, ACI Information Group
Blogs, blogs, blogs! As the General Manager of the ACI Scholarly Blog Index I talk with faculty bloggers and librarians every day about the increasing importance of scholarly blogs in the chain of scholarly communication and as a discovery service for new research, scholarship, and academic trends. | I'm a former publisher and enjoy seeing how the world of scholarly blogs is unfolding on the academic landscape and also how ACI plays a role... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Chief Strategist for Research Collaboration, North Carolina State University
avatar for Thomas Nadelhoffer

Thomas Nadelhoffer

Associate Professor of Philosophy, College of Charleston
WW

W. William Woolsey

Associate Professor of Economics, The Citadel



Thursday November 3, 2016 3:35pm - 4:15pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:00pm

General History Walking Tour
Reservations Required; $20 per person

This tour gives a general overview of Charleston’s history from the colonial era onward – through the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, to the city’s rediscovery and revitalization of the past 40 years. Participants will gain insight into Charleston’s early wealth and culture, viewing the city’s impressive public buildings and private mansions. Visitors will learn of architectural influences and other factors that resulted in modifications to original structures, with explanation of the single house, the double house and dependencies. (2 hour tour, covering about a mile)

Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides for the tours. All tours are $20 per person and payment may be made in cash or check at tour time.  Reservations for all tours may be made at broadstreettours.com.  Tours must have a minimum of 6 people to go.



Thursday November 3, 2016 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Washington Park 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:15pm

Refreshment Break


Thursday November 3, 2016 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:45pm

Access to Freely Available Journal Articles: Gold, Green and Rogue Open Access across the Disciplines
A recent bibliometrics study found that 54% of 4.6 million scientific papers from peer-reviewed journals indexed in Scopus during the years 2011-2013 could be downloaded for free on the internet in April of 2014 (Archambault, et al. 2014). As time rolls on, authors and researchers are increasingly using more-and-less legal scholarly article sharing services to "take back the literature," or even just to access it more conveniently (Bohannon, 2016). The objective of this study was to evaluate a manageable sample of journal articles across the sciences, social sciences and humanities for their availability in gold, green and rogue open access forms, including ResearchGate and Sci-Hub. Attendees will gain a greater appreciation of the extent of open access availability through Google Scholar, Google and commercial discovery systems, and will be challenged to roll with the times by expanding the role of libraries in broadening access to the freely available literature.

Moderators
BH

Bobby Hollandsworth

Learning Commons and Digital Studio Coordinator, Clemson University Libraries
Bobby Hollandsworth is the Learning Commons and Digital Studio Coordinator, Business Reference Librarian, and RefWorks Administrator at RM Cooper Library on the campus of Clemson University. He serves as the library liaison to the departments of Economics, Finance, Agribusiness, and Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
avatar for John McDonald

John McDonald

Associate Dean for Collections, University of Southern California
John McDonald is the Associate Dean for Collections at the University of Southern California. In this role he handles all aspects of Collections and Technical Services. Active professionally, he has published a number of articles on collection development and information usage behaviors, with a focus on statistical analysis of data. He has served on a variety of national and international publisher and vendor library advisory boards, as well as... Read More →
avatar for Jason Price

Jason Price

Director of Licensing Operations, SCELC
Jason holds a doctorate in plant evolutionary ecology from Indiana University Bloomington where he gained in depth experience as a teacher and researcher. He thoroughly enjoys applying data analysis skills he developed during graduate school to current library challenges. His role at SCELC provides opportunities to work with libraries, content and software providers, and other consortia, to improve library products and expand resource access.



Thursday November 3, 2016 4:45pm - 5:30pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:45pm

The Devil is in the Details: Challenges of Collaborative Collecting

There is an old African saying:  “If you want to go fast, go alone; if you want to go far, go together.” The Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida (UF) are active participants in a number of collaborative collection development initiatives that provide significant benefits to us, to our partners, and to others who benefit from the results of our efforts. Each of these initiatives requires a significant effort to establish and sustain trust and to maintain the value to the collaborators. Each step often takes longer to plan and to execute because a number of people have to be consulted and have their preferences and concerns addressed. But UF continues to invest in these initiatives and to seek additional opportunities for deep collaboration, because in the end, they take us much farther than we can go alone. 

Examples of these collaborations, and the details that challenged us, include the ASERL Collaborative Federal Depository Program; the Digital Library of the Carribean (dLOC); the Florida Academic Repository (FLARE) and Scholar’s Trust, two shared print archiving projects in which Florida has a lead or significant role; a somewhat controversial collaboration with Elsevier, recently expended to include other publishers through CHORUS; and a new partnership with the Biblioteca Nacional “José Martí” de Cuba, (BNJM) to establish a Cuban Heritage collection for worldwide public access by collaborating with other research libraries to digitize monographs, journals, newspapers, and government documents from and about Cuba produced primarily before the 20th Century. 


Moderators
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →

Speakers
JR

Judith Russell

Dean of University Libraries, University of Florida



Thursday November 3, 2016 4:45pm - 5:30pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

4:45pm

The Evolution of E-books
As we all know, the advent of the ebook have had a profound impact on libraries. What started as very tentative steps with NetLibrary at the turn of the millennium – this seems like a lifetime ago! - has rapidly evolved with the integration of digital content and services in libraries. The evolution from print to online has been a rocky and complicated journey, unlike the relatively smooth transition from print to online format for journals. Much has been written and said about the challenges and opportunities resulting from the ebook. Major challenges include ownership, preservation, discovery, accessibility, licensing and acquisition models, and usability. It’s time to take a step back and look at the remarkable evolution of the ebook – where have we come from, where are we today, and most importantly, where do we want the adoption or integration of ebooks to lead us? What does this mean for the iconic role of the monograph in libraries and in particular for the success of our students and faculty? Looking back can help us better understand the odyssey of the road ahead. What are the main drivers, challenges, and opportunities? Our panelists have significant and varying experiences with ebooks in libraries and they will bring us their insights and analyses.  They will address various issues and challenges, guided by the questions below.

Historical Perspective of eBooks
How have eBooks changed over time? 
What is your perspective on the evolution of the eBook?  
What do you like and/or don’t like?

The Future of eBooks
What new developments are on the horizon?
What are the latest models emerging?
Will these changes meet the needs of students in higher education?
What are the implications for academic libraries/students/educators?

Impact
How will eBook reading impact literacy, reading, and learning in today’s world?
Will this affect academic collection development?
What philosophical challenges are posed as academic libraries embrace eBook collection development?

Moderators
avatar for Tony Horava

Tony Horava

AUL Collections, University of Ottawa
I've been involved in Collections work for many years, and have seen remarkable transformations over the years. The challenges around ebooks, licensing, budgets, consortial strategies, new forms of knowledge and scholarly communications spring to mind. Reading in the digital age fascinates me - it is such a sea-change. The Charleston Conference is always energizing. I look forward to connecting with many people and hearing new ideas and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mitchell Davis

Mitchell Davis

CFO, Bibliolabs
Mitchell Davis is a publishing and media entrepreneur. He was the founder in 2000 of BookSurge the world’s first integrated global print-on-demand and publishing services company (sold to Amazon.com in 2005 and re-branded as CreateSpace).   Since 2008 he has been founder & chief business officer of BiblioLabs -- the creators of BiblioBoard. | BiblioBoard is an award-winning App and web content delivery... Read More →
DD

David Durant

Federal Documents and Social Sciences Librarian, East Carolina University
My professional interests focus on the importance of preserving and ensuring access to legacy print collections in the digital library environment. This is an especially pressing issue in federal documents, where my institution is a member of the ASERL Collaborative Federal Documents Program, but also for broader monographic collections as well. I'm also interested in the ways in which technology is altering the ways in which we read and think... Read More →
avatar for James O'Donnell

James O'Donnell

University Librarian & Professor, Arizona State University Libraries
James J. O'Donnell is the University Librarian at ASU Libraries.He has published widely on the history and culture of the late antique Mediterranean world and is a recognized innovator in the application of networked information technology in higher education. In 1990, he co-founded Bryn Mawr Classical Review, the second on-line scholarly journal in the humanities ever created. In 1994, he taught an Internet-based seminar on the work of Augustine... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 4:45pm - 5:30pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Speed Networking
New to the Charleston Conference, the speed networking session is designed to introduce you to a large number of attendees in an efficient and relaxed way. This session will allow vendors to connect directly with librarians

How it works: you will have brief 3-minute meetings with attendees at the event (one minute per person and one minute for discussion). These quick meetings are the starting point for conversation and networking throughout the conference and beyond. Make the most out of your conference investment through this unique session.

Moderators
EC

Edward Colleran

Partner, Triumvirate Content Consultants

Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Thursday Poster Sessions and 'Happy Hour' Networking Event
Mix and mingle with other conference attendees over a beverage and a snack while visiting the Poster Sessions. Appetizers will be provided and a cash bar will be available to purchase beverages. We will also have our brand new "Speed Networking" session available nearby to introduce you to a large number of attendees in an efficient and relaxed way. Don't miss it!

Moderators
TG

Tom Gilson

Associate Editor, Against the Grain

Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

A Tale of Two Liaison Programs: University of Central Florida Libraries & Louisiana State University Libraries Partnering for Subject Librarian Excellence
Are you considering establishing a new or re-invigorated Subject Liaison program in your library but don't know how to begin? Why not partner with an established liaison program at another library?

In spring 2015, key public service managers at Louisiana State University Libraries visited University of Central Florida Libraries to learn about UCF's three-year-old reimagined Subject Liaison program.  LSU managers liked what they saw at UCF and returned home with a to-do list that included: working with their Collection Development Department to fine-tune academic program assignments for LSU liaisons; creating a liaison training program that focused on academic program profiling, faculty profiling, curriculum mapping, curriculum integrated instruction, and increased  liaison visibility and accessibility; proactive outreach to faculty and students to market library services and resources.

Sample liaison training documents, collegial advice, and progress reports traveled back and forth between UCF and LSU throughout summer and fall 2015, leading to the UCF- RIS Head traveling to LSU in January 2016 for face-to-face training sessions with LSU Liaisons. Fast forward to fall 2016 and now LSU liaisons are participating in bi-weekly training meetings that incorporate topics from curriculum mapping to licensing of electronic databases.
 
Public Service heads from UCF and LSU will discuss how their liaison programs are the same and how they differ; what the challenges are in their current programs and what the future may hold. Lessons learned by UCF and LSU will provide insight for other academic libraries wishing to create liaison programs designed to support student and faculty success at their own institutions. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and share ideas from their own liaison program perspectives. After participating in this program, attendees will be able to develop winning liaison program strategies for their own institution.

This poster is co-authored by Lois Kuyper-Rushing, Associate Dean for Public Services at Louisiana State University, who was unable to attend the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head, Research and Information Services Dept., University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). | | Barbara was an Invited Speaker at the 2016 Japan Association of National University Libraries (JANUL) Symposium at the University of Tokyo where she presented "The Learning Commons... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Against the Numbers: Usage Statistics and Critical Library Instruction
Librarians may not typically consider consulting usage statistics when preparing for an instructional session. However, doing so may allow them to take a critical approach to instruction and faculty collaborations. Usage statistics, though imperfect, allow librarians to pinpoint underutilized electronic resources and, when combined with qualitative data, may help librarians determine what subject-specific resources are overlooked by students. Learn how librarians may partner with faculty to proactively promote library resources through instructional sessions, instructional tools, and assignment design. Such collaborations may improve use of library resources and encourage students to incorporate marginalized resources, works, and voices into their course work.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Binder

Amanda Binder

Social Sciences and History Librarian, UNC Charlotte
KY

Karna Younger

Faculty Engagement Librarian, The University of Kansas Libraries


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

An Electronic Resources Workflow is Worth a Thousand Words
The processes involved in managing electronic resources are complex. They are becoming even more so with the addition of streaming media, DDA, evidence-based subscriptions, weeding, and unanticipated changes. Rowan University's electronic resources group recently documented its electronic resource management workflows in order to a) communicate complex processes to a diverse group of library stakeholders such as reference and instruction librarians, collection development professionals, acquisitions and technology and systems staff; b) provide guidelines to train new employees; and c) establish a record of current processes, for future reference, evaluation, and revision of workflows. This poster session shows how one academic library has customized workflows to accommodate the needs of its users, and how sharing these workflows has positively contributed to the library.

This poster was co-authored by Lauren Orner, Electronic Resources and Serials Program Assistant, Rowan University, who was unable to attend the conference. 

Speakers
avatar for Christine Davidian

Christine Davidian

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Rowan University


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

An Exploration of Bibliometric Network Visualizations and their Role in the Library
Visualizations based on bibliometric data can be used to map the the output of a faculty, department, or institution's impact and their collaborations with one another. As metrics of impact become more important, especially as grant funding agencies mandate the measurement of research impact and other similar outcomes, libraries and librarians face an opportune moment to develop services, skills, and relationships with university faculty and administrators using bibliometrics and visualizations.

This poster will demonstrate how North Carolina State University (NCSU) has recently developed capabilities in bibliometric network visualizations. Librarians at NCSU have worked with faculty and administrators to develop network graphs of scholarly output and collaboration of departments and institutes on campus. Some of the uses of the network graphs were to track the development and growth of a grant funded institute at NCSU and to determine the structure of a college's departments.

Attendees will learn how to use bibliometric data gathered from databases such as Web of Science and how to process and visualize this data using open source network visualization software such as Sci2 and Gephi. Different visualizations will also be demonstrated in order to compare and contrast the effectiveness of presenting such complex information. Lastly, attendees will learn how the visualization of bibliometric data can be applied to the context of the library, both in terms of the upskilling of librarians and the relationships built with faculty and administrators from providing this service.

Speakers
JC

James Cheng

NCSU Libraries Lois Madden Todd Fellow, NCSU Libraries


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Consumer Health for College Students
At Michigan State University (MSU), the health of our students is important. College brings up many issues for students such as depression, anxiety and more. According to a subset of results for MSU from the 2014 National College Health Assessment, 84% of students reported feeling overwhelmed at least once in the last year and 28% reported it affected their academic performance. These statistics are on par with national averages. Although many campuses have accessible health services, they are not used to their full potential. One study shows that of students who are diagnosed with depression, only 24% are actively receiving treatment. Presumably, many students are trying to cope with these health issues on their own.

We decided to start a pilot program establishing a small consumer health book collection aimed at issues students are facing. We have found reports of child- or adult-focused consumer health collections but few devoted to college students. We hope to reach students with health information that may go into more depth than they are able to find online. We are placing the books in our browsing collection which is a high profile location and includes popular works of fiction and non-fiction.

To help with choosing materials in subjects of high need, we collaborated with several organizations across the campus, including the health center, the Student Health Advisory Council, and local health education experts. Through this we can position the library as a partner in the wellbeing of our students.

Speakers
avatar for Mari Monosoff-Richards

Mari Monosoff-Richards

Health Sciences Librarian, Michigan State University


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Embracing the Future While Preserving the Past: Libraries Find Common Ground at the Joint Library Facility
It is not a new trend that libraries are being forced to reduce their print collections in order to repurpose space for their students and faculty. Indeed, it has become more the norm than the exception here in the United States. It is not a new trend that more US libraries are sharing facilities to store print materials, but the stability and successful continuity of these collaborations varies widely across the country.

The Joint Library Facility in Bryan, Texas, has been a successful collaboration between Texas A&M University and the University of Texas in Austin since 2013. The first 18,000 square foot warehouse built in 2012 can hold 1 million volumes and is now three-quarters full. A second warehouse is breaking ground just a few feet away to hold another 1 million volumes. The enormous success of this unlikely partnership was built on a strategic plan to hold one copy of each unique item, and allow free Interlibrary Loan services for any Texas library in need. Academic and medical libraries alike have benefitted from this unique common ground. The Texas Medical Center Library is just one of many that secured access to a print collection lost in a library re-design, by partnering with the JLF. Meanwhile, the JLF is acquiring new spaces and new roles in preserving the past while embracing the future.

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Romano

Joanne Romano

Head of Resource Management, Texas Medical Center Library
I enjoy talking with other resource and collection managers about how they collaborate with their reference librarians to advertise the depth and breadth of their collections, and the creative ways they have found to do so. I also like to hear about what communication channels they use to make sure their administrators understand how the collection supports the overall mission of their institution.
WV

Wyoma VanDuinkerken

Director, Joint Library Facility, Texas A&M University



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Failure and Success: A Materials Budget Case Study at Connecticut College

This poster session will outline the strategy Connecticut College librarians used in an attempt to secure funds to offset inflationary cost increases for serials and e-resources and the strategy used to eliminate subscriptions when that request for funding was denied. One half of the poster, "Failure," will share the activities and data used to educate the College community about the crisis in the materials budget and to convince budget planners that additional funds were needed to prevent the elimination of resources.

As new funds were not forthcoming, the second half of the poster, "Success," will share the process used for faculty and library staff to determine together which resources would be eliminated and thus ensure the retention of more important titles. The Collections Advisory Task Force, including faculty with a history of heavy library use and librarians, identified $100,000 worth of titles for elimination. The Task Force meetings, though initially contentious, were effective in establishing process and trust, and eventually members agreed on titles for cancellation. The list was presented to the College faculty in May 2016. 

This poster session will be of interest to those who face the same kind of pressure to reduce subscriptions due to flat or decreasing materials budgets. Others will find interesting the strategies to convince campus stakeholders of the problem, and to manage the situation when funding is not approved. We hope viewers will come away with insight to improve their own strategies to secure funding or, alternatively, manage subscription elimination decisions effectively.


Speakers
avatar for Beth Hansen

Beth Hansen

Director of Information Resources, Connecticut College
In my current position as Director, Information Resources and a member of the Information Services Leadership Team, I provide oversight for the libraries' Information Resources Team including collection development, acquisitions, cataloging, serials & e-resources and the Greer Music Library. As a team we manage a materials budget of over $1,660,000. Connecticut College is an active participant in the CTW Consortium with Trinity College and... Read More →
avatar for W. Lee Hisle

W. Lee Hisle

VP for Information Services and Librarian of the College, Connecticut College
As CIO, I oversee all libraries, instructional technology, administrative systems, networks, and telecommunications at Connecticut College. Past professional activities include service as Chair of the Board of Trustees of LYRASIS, President of the Association of College and Research Libraries, and Chair of the ALA Nominating Committee. Recent presentations made at the Charleston Conference, EDUCAUSE, NERCOMP, the Consortium of Liberal Arts... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Four Years of E-book Purchasing: What Are We Buying and Is It Getting Used?
This poster describes a project we undertook to review how our purchasing patterns have changed since we set up licenses with e-book vendors through GOBI four years ago. While we knew which liaisons were initially most interested in purchasing e-books, after setting up the licenses we had not gathered any follow up data about what selection decisions liaisons were making. We wanted to see what data we could compile on this, and we were particularly interested in identifying subject areas in which a real mix of e-books and print were being purchased which we could examine to compare print circulation and e-book usage of purchased titles. The objective of the poster is to show what data we were able to gather, what aspects of this study proved more challenging than initially expected, and how we're hoping to use our findings to shape internal conversations about e-book purchasing.

Speakers
avatar for Amelia Brunskill

Amelia Brunskill

Coordinator of Collections & Scholarly Resources, DePaul University
Amelia Brunskill is the Coordinator of Collections & Scholarly Resources at DePaul University. She was previously DePaul's Electronic Resources Librarian and prior to that she was the Liaison Librarian for the Sciences at Dickinson College, in Carlisle, PA. She received her MSIS from the University of Texas at Austin in 2006. 


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Linked Data and SHARE
ARL's SHARE project (http://www.share-research.org) "is building a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle." Working with SHARE, the Center for Open Science (COS) has harvested and organized a wealth of metadata from various institutional repositories and other sources such as open data repositories. While COS has already provided a search function, there remains a need for other mechanisms to discover, search and visualize content within SHARE. With funding from the Sloan Foundation, the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University, Portico and IEEE have developed RMap (http://rmap-project.info/rmap/), which features a method for building and displaying linked data information graphs.

Using the RMap protocol for aggregations known as DiSCO, which is based on the OAI-ORE protocol, and a set of REST APIs, the RMap team has worked with COS to develop a data model for SHARE and harmonize the SHARE metadata into a set of linked data information graphs. These linked data graphs represent a useful resource and lens for making new connections between content within the SHARE network, identifying gaps in SHARE metadata and visualizing the SHARE network as a linked data framework. The COS has expressed an interest for additional work with RMap and SHARE.

The RMap team has also generated linked data information graphs from all of the journal content from IEEE and additional content from ACM, NCBI and Portico, all of which was used to infer connections within the SHARE network.

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Metrics, Meaning, and Context: Librarian Roles in Reporting Faculty Impact and Author Profile Curation
Citation analysis can be used as a tool to report activity and impact for departmental annual reports, faculty promotion and tenure dossiers, campus-wide visibility initiatives, and beyond. At a STEM focused doctoral granting institution, librarians analyze citation metrics annually, gathering h-index numbers, citation numbers at varying intervals, and highest cited papers for each individual. Comparing three available citation tools, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar, librarians noticed many inconsistencies and variations. I plan to walk participants through this analysis process, highlight efficiencies, and point out problem areas.

Newer tools such as ResearchGate, Kudos, and Altmetrics are bringing more to the conversation about truly measuring impact, in addition to tools like SciVal, Pure, and Converis. There is a common problem of maintenance of effort and author identification. ORCiD has made great strides in many author identification areas, but there is more to be done to engage the faculty to populate their individual profiles.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Clemons

Jessica Clemons

Interim Director of College Libraries, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Nothing Changes if Nothing Changes: Three User-Centered Collection Development Practices at Carleton University Library
From 2014-2016, Carleton University Library has been super-adding to the traditional ways it practices collection development. In addition to the subject liaison firm order selection model, the past two years the Library has added three successful new user-centred ways to acquire material for the Library. In the Collections department, we ended the approval plan and instead used its selection framework to create a DDA plan. In the Reserves department, we started a textbook purchasing program. And in the Interlibrary Loans department, we instituted print purchase on demand procedures.

We propose a triptych with three easy-to-read sections, dedicated to each of the preceding three initiatives. Each section will provide a concise but substantial overview of the initiative; set-up challenges and parameters of operation; data visualization of circulation statistics compared to the industry average; strengths and weaknesses; and key takeaways.

This poster may be of interest to librarians who would like to consider adopting one or more of these user-centred collection development initiatives, and to vendors who might like to hear about why user- centred models resonate well in the current academic climate of accountability and good financial stewardship.

Speakers
avatar for David Sharp

David Sharp

Head, Collection Development and Acquisitions, Carleton University Library


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

One Size Does Not Fit All: Tuning the Discovery Service to Meet Stakeholder Needs
More often than not, a one-sized single solution does not fit. When implementing a discovery service, each institution has its own requirements and different types of users have different needs. In this session, the two universities will examine different configuration and customization options that are available to libraries when implementing a discovery service. Join Esther Onega, University of Virginia and Kristi Lobrano, Franklin University to discuss what libraries can do independently, and where vendor support comes in. Topics include branding, profile options, catalog and IR loading, linking, and website integration.

Speakers
avatar for Kristi Lobrano

Kristi Lobrano

Systems Librarian, Franklin University
avatar for Eric L Frierson MSI

Eric L Frierson MSI

Director of Field Engineering, North America, EBSCO Information Services
Hey! I'm the team lead for discovery service engineering and integration for EBSCO. This means I can answer any question you might have about integrating EDS or the EDS API into your library and campus. I'm also a developer, building applications that use our API in outside-of-the-box ways, and love to hear new ideas for how library resources can be used.
avatar for Esther Onega

Esther Onega

Director, Collections Delivery and Access, University of Virgina
Esther Onega has been a librarian in various capacities at the University of Virginia since 1997, starting as the Distance Education Librarian. In 2007 she became the Google Book Project Manager, then Head of the Brown Science & Engineering Library, and now she is the Director of Collections Delivery and Access (ILL, Stacks, HathiTrust, EDS, Alumni Databases, etc.). She received her MLS from the University of Maryland in 1989 and worked as a law... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Open and Collaborative: Building the Big Ten Academic Alliance Geoportal Abstract
Ten member institutions of the Big Ten Academic Alliance, formerly the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) worked together to create the Big Ten Academic Alliance Geoportal, a discovery interface to facilitate access, and to connect scholars to geospatial data resources. Ten of the member institutions are participating in the project, including the University of Illinois at Urbana­-Champaign, Indiana University, the University of Iowa, the University of Maryland, the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota, Pennsylvania State University, Purdue University, and the University of Wisconsin-­Madison. The institutions worked together to identify openly available data sets to make searchable in the interface. The project then organized the collaborative creation and aggregation of discovery-focused metadata describing geospatial data resources and made those resources discoverable via an open source portal built in Geoblacklight. The collectively supported project provides the staffing and technical infrastructure to host and develop the services. The poster will show the organization of this collaborative project and the established processes for collaborative geospatial metadata creation and portal development. It will also outline upcoming work for the project, including interface assessment and plans to include licensed data in the discovery interface.

Speakers
avatar for Mara Blake

Mara Blake

Spatial and Numeric Data Librarian, University of Michigan
As a spatial and numeric data library, I work on building our library collections of geospatial data and providing better discoverability and access to the collection. I also work with researchers using numeric, qualitative, and geospatial data technologies in their research and teaching.


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Grand Cypress Ballroom, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Ordering E-Books from a Print Book Vendor
The University of Southern Mississippi recently began ordering e-books through their primary book vendor, Midwest Library Service. This is a new service offered by Midwest beginning in 2016. The University of Southern Mississippi had previously ordered e-books with another book vendor, but within the last two years had switched to ordering directly with the e-book vendors - Ebook Library and Ebrary. Jennifer Culley, Collection Management and Acquisitions Librarian at The University of Southern Mississippi, will discuss the process for adding this new service, issues along the way, any possible benefits or costs, and also discuss changes to work flows for the Acquisitions department. Cindy Human, Regional Manager with Midwest Library Service, will explain the software changes and steps taken to make this new service work for The University of Southern Mississippi. This presentation will describe the collaborative process between The University of Southern Mississippi Libraries and Midwest Library Service in setting up the new e-book service and will be informative for the audience who may be considering adding a similar feature with their book vendors, or give participants who want to discuss their issues or experiences a forum to do so.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Culley

Jennifer Culley

Collection Management and Acquisitions Librarian, The University of Southern Mississippi
CH

Cindy Human

Regional Manager, Midwest Library Service


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Passing the Baton: Data-Driven Succession Planning and the New Liaison Role
Learn how to embark on or re-engage with academic department support in meaningful, data-driven ways by pulling from the practices developed at a large public university in the process of re-envisioning its own liaison program. Drawing from recent field scholarship, existing liaison activity rubrics, and the experiences of early career professionals in Business and the Social Sciences, participants will take home tested tips on how to successfully transition liaison duties in an effective, comprehensive manner.

This poster presentation will address: seamless succession planning, vendor relations, collection maintenance and management, cultivating faculty relationships, and programming magnetic outreach in and outside of your library.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Ahnberg

Katherine Ahnberg

Academic Services Librarian, University of South Florida
NW

Nora Wood

Business Librarian, University of South Florida



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Rolling with a Direction in Mind: Implementing a DRM-free DDA Program and Understanding User Behavior
Demand-driven acquisitions has been part of the University of Washington's ebook purchasing strategy since 2011, via local and consortial DDA programs with EBL. While this aligns with the University Libraries' commitment to user-driven collection development, it has not advanced its more recently affirmed strategy of increasing the amount of DRM-free content provided to patrons. A DDA program begun with JSTOR in May, 2015, unites these two strategies and also aligns with the University Libraries' desire to support university presses and other not-for-profit scholarly publishing.

Information on the University of Washington's implementation experience will be shared, including budgeting, duplication control, and assessment, along with comparative usage data with other local ebook collections.

The University of Washington experience will be put into a broader context by JSTOR, especially as it relates to acquisition methods, discovery, and usage. There will be a detailed overview of post-purchase usage across libraries for DRM-free ebooks acquired via JSTOR's DDA model and those purchased as individual titles from YBP or direct from JSTOR. This will be compared to the usage seen from the University of Washington.

Understanding how users are finding and using DRM-free ebooks is also important to libraries wanting to promote this type of DRM-free content. JSTOR will provide an overview of how ebooks are first being discovered before chapters are used on the JSTOR p[latform from various sources such as Google, indexed discovery services, JSTOR, and library websites. The University of Washington experience will be analyzed to illustrate these findings.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Di Biase

Linda Di Biase

Ebook and Collaborative Collections Strategy Librarian, University of Washington Libraries
Linda Di Biase's 30 years of collection development experience at the University of Washington Libraries has encompassed everything from information resources selection to budget allocation and consortial collection strategies. She has overseen the development of a robust academic ebook collection, both at her own institution and for the Orbis Cascade Alliance, where she has served on the Ebook Working Group. Linda has published and presented... Read More →
JL

John Lenahan

Associate Vice President, Institutional Participation and Strategic Partnerships, Outreach and Participation, Ithaka


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Self-Directed Training Programs: What Have We Gotten Ourselves Into!
In response to an Old Dominion University Library Administration initiative, the Acquisitions & Preservation Services and Reference Departments participated in a self-directed training pilot project over a six month period from October 2015 through March 2016. Administrators looked to the departments to inform them of the viability of implementing such a program system-wide and to develop a blueprint for other units in the library to follow in case of implementation.

Department members were charged with completing two programs per month in any of eighteen subject areas. In addition, participants were asked to keep a log of programs attended, to write a synopsis of those programs, and to explain how the sessions impacted their work performance. Webinars, formal training modules, in-library programs, on-campus training sessions - about any delivery format and forum were acceptable options.

Visuals will provide an overview of the initiative, charts of training sessions attended, and challenges faced by participants. Perhaps, most importantly, takeaways and recommendations will be represented including insights into whether self-directed training is a feasible option for meeting individual and library training needs. An example of an effective and efficient self-directed training model will be featured.

Speakers
avatar for Rob Tench

Rob Tench

Acquisitions & Preservation Services Librarian, Old Dominion University
In addition to his acquisitions and preservation duties, Rob is a subject bibliographer for Civil & Environmental Engineering and Engineering Management & Systems. He has been at ODU since 2007.



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

University Press DDA and EBA Acquisition Pilots at UIUC
The University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign has been exploring options to obtain the best academic content from University Presses in the format and on the platform users find fits their needs. The Library works with a number of vendors to cover the purchase of new academic content from these publishers. Funding comes from a central pool for new titles as well as the bibliographers' subject allocations. Users had not been happy with platforms with DRM that limit easy use or with the sheer number of ebook interfaces. The poster covers new initiatives designed to enhance access to ebooks while not replacing the print access many faculty still want. Metrics from two large DDA/EBA pilots completed in FY2016 that allowed for online access to new and archival ebook content will be presented. The implementation of the programs as well as patterns of use will provided. An analysis of user preferences collected from surveys is also included as well as a review ebook purchasing models at UIUC. The poster will cover next steps to enhance access to academic ebooks. Participants will hear learn about new evidence based potential for university press ebook acquisitions and what worked well or did not with the programs. Questions are most welcome during the session.

Speakers
SB

Stephanie Baker

Technical Services Division Research Programmer, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Tom Teper

Tom Teper

Associate University Librarian for Collections and Technical Services and Associate Dean of Libraries Associate Pr, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Lynn Wiley

Lynn Wiley

Head of Acquisitions: Associate Professor University Libraries, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Will Weed DDA for Money: DDA Collection Management Decisions in an Economic Crisis
2015 was not just a tough year for the mining sector in Canada. The drastic drop in the value of the Canadian dollar resulted in a fiscal crisis that left Western University Libraries with an unprecedented and unpredictable 25 percent decrease in purchasing power. With a large, successful DDA program to maintain, Western was faced with an economic crisis of their own.

The likelihood of a continued weak Canadian dollar relative to the US dollar led Western to determine that rolling with the fiscal times would be the only option. As a cornerstone of their acquisition strategy, the DDA would have to be revamped to ensure minimal impact on both stakeholders and the collection while working within the current fiscal realities.

This joint session shares the Western experience in working with ProQuest to develop a collection management plan that would transform a challenge into an opportunity by using a budget crisis to spur the creation of a replicable and repeatable DDA collection clean-up process. We will share the step-by-step project timeline, describe problems and outline how we worked together to develop solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Cassady

Samuel Cassady

Digital Information Resources Librarian, Western University
CH

Cara Huwieler

Collections Consultant, ProQuest - Coutts


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Are Print Books REALLY Dead?: Exploring the Relationship between the Technology Acceptance Model and the Use of E-books at a Large Research University
Recent research suggests that digital natives still prefer to read print or hard copy books. However, a study that applied the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to faculty acceptance of e-books found one group, those who feel they are easier to use, do use them. Researchers plan to survey current students who are library users about their usage of e-books in relation to TAM. The research seeks to examine the following questions: How does perceived usefulness affect e-book usage by library users? How does perceived ease of use affect e-book usage by library users? Is there a difference in the effect of perceived usefulness between online and in person library users? Is there a difference in the effect of perceived ease of use between online and in person library users? Building on models from psychology recent studies explored the possible relationships between TAM and usability testing found a correlation between perceived ease of use and usability attributes. An extensive e-book collection provides support to advance educational excellence. However, this cannot happen if these resources are not used. We hope to be able to share information about e-books, usability, and user acceptance to help librarians make more informed choices when selecting e-book vendors or ordering titles. 

Speakers
AR

Allyson Rodriguez, MLS

Strategic Collections Librarian, University of North Texas Libraries



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Deciphering eBook Vendors, Models, and Access Rules: Using Catalog Records to Aid Subject Selectors
Managing eBooks in the library catalog, as part of a package or on an individual title basis, involves a variety of purchase or subscription models, vendor platforms, and access rules. From the subject selector perspective, it can be challenging to identify when an eBook title is owned, leased, or simply loaded in the catalog awaiting a potential evidence based selection or demand driven acquisition when making collection development decisions. At Randall Library we have added information to certain fields in eBook catalog records in order to aid liaison librarians in selection decisions, but without confusing patrons. This process, which we also apply to streaming video records, helps to distinguish the different access and ownership status, whether it is an evidence based selection, demand driven acquisition, owned, a subscription from our institution, or a subscription from the statewide consortium NC LIVE.

Speakers
JC

Jeanne Cross

Coordinator of Collection Development, University of North Carolina Wilmington
GM

Gary Moore

Coordinator of Cataloging, University of North Carolina Wilmington



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Head in the Clouds: Will a Next Generation Library Management System Bring Clear Vision?
Libraries are constantly looking for efficient ways to manage print and electronic resources through entire lifecycles and uphold their commitment to be responsible stewards of university assets. The cloud is one way for libraries to achieve these goals. Cloud computing allows storing and accessing of data and programs over the Internet instead of on a computer's hard drive. In 2011, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries decided to look at cloud-based library management systems to replace the legacy system they had for ten years. They were looking for ways to improve workflows, unify job functions and improve staff success. After researching a number of systems and finding an attractive prospect, the VCU Libraries was invited to become an "Early Adopter" and implemented Ex Libris' Alma.  As an adopter of the cloud for four years, they are examining their decision. 

This poster will describe the Libraries' journey from "Go Live" in 2012 up until the four year anniversary on October 24, 2016 and share successes, challenges and downright failures. The audience will learn if the cloud really brought simplified workflows, a connected environment and staff success. 

Speakers
avatar for Denise Branch

Denise Branch

Head, Continuing Resources, Virginia Commonwealth University
Denise is a native of Powhatan, Virginia and the Head of Continuing Resources at the VCU Libraries, earning her B.S. from VCU and M.L.I.S. from The Catholic University of America. Managing e-serials within the Ex Libris Alma and Primo system keeps her busy. She contributes her expertise for licensing, ordering, receiving and maintaining the Libraries’ extensive collection of e-serials. Overseeing the answering of user e-journal reports and... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Housing Diversity in Children's Literature
Several studies have examined diversity in children's literature, such as gender diversity and racial diversity. This concurrent session focuses on an often-overlooked issue in children's literature...housing diversity.  Renting and apartment-living are increasingly popular housing options. Many families with children live in something other than an owned single-family detached house. In the stories they read and the accompanying images, children need to see individuals portrayed positively in a variety of housing environments. 

Due to the limited research in this field, a pilot study was conducted to evaluate the "housing message" in children's literature.  This poster will address the limited research in this field. Then, using both positive and negative examples, the poster will display a variety of children's books to evaluate the words and images that are used in these stories to describe the housing structures, the neighborhood, the residents, and the staff. 

Speakers
CE

Carla Earhart

Professor, Residential Property Management, Department of Family & Consumer Sciences, Ball State University



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

How to Allocate Your Collection Development Funds Using Supply and Demand, and the Excel Tricks You’ll Need to Keep Your Sanity
Take the guesswork out of distributing your collection development dollars! If you do not have an allocation formula, this session is for you. If you have an allocation formula but you're not using circulation statistics or supply-side data, this poster is for you. If you hate Microsoft Excel with the passion of a jilted lover, this poster is definitely for you. Learn tips, tricks, and essential shortcuts! 

Speakers
JZ

Jessica Zellers

Collection Development Librarian, Hunter Library, Western Carolina University



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Metadata Maker for Digital Publication
As many academic and research libraries are considering or have already started developing digital scholarly publishing programs, these programs need to find a proper way to create metadata for access to these new publications. However, metadata for digital publications has its own challenges in two areas: metadata schemas and controlled vocabularies. For example, metadata for digital publications requires a specific set of metadata elements that are different from traditional print resources. Also, in order for scholarly digital publications to be managed and discovered with other books that are published by established publishing houses, the application of subject headings should be described using controlled vocabularies that are standard in the publishing community, such as BISAC (https://www.bisg.org/bisac/bisac-subject-codes), and represented in the ONIX format in addition to MARC and MODS, metadata schemas used in the library domain. Furthermore, as libraries are moving forward towards the semantic web and linked data, metadata should also include linked data components that would increase the discoverability of resources on the web.

This poster introduces a metadata creation tool for electronic resources including digital publications, Metadata Maker for E-books (http://quest.library.illinois.edu/marcmaker/ebooks/) created to support these needs. The tool utilizes two subject headings: FAST for traditional library description, and BISAC subject codes and terms for publishers. Metadata Maker provides users, who may have minimal metadata knowledge and experience, a tool to create metadata in five different formats: MARC, MARCXML, MODS, schema.org embedded HTML, and ONIX for Books, depending on their needs.  

Speakers
MK

Myung-Ja K. Han

Associate Professor and Metadata Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
DK

Deren Kudeki

Research Programmer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
PL

Patricia Lampron

Metadata Services Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

The Dreaded Cold Call
Every subject librarian has had a lukewarm relationship with a department or two at different points in their career. Many academic librarians and libraries accept this as the status-quo or the cost of doing business.  However there is another option, the dreaded Cold Call. Cold calling is a business technique where a salesperson contacts individuals who have not expressed an interest in their services or products. While this is a sales focused business technique the same concepts are transferable to academic libraries. 

The poster will cover literature, theory, and best practices in connecting with faculty in departments that are historically under represented through library services. The presenters own experience with cold calling, salesmanship, and how this relates to subject librarianship will be analyzed and discussed through case study, data analysis, and measurable outcomes.  

Speakers
SP

Seth Porter

Co-Coordinator of Instruction & Social Science Librarian, Georgia Tech Library



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

To Buy or Not to Buy: Rolling into the Future with ILLiad
This poster will showcase our new method for receiving purchase requests from faculty, staff, and students. ILLiad software is typically used for Interlibrary Loan activities only, but a special addon [produced by the IDS Project at SUNY] can be added and used for acquisitions and collection development activities/analysis. The poster will include the process of implementation and results of this new service. Discussion of OCLC's Collection Evaluation will also be included as a part of our collection analysis process. 

The objective of the session is to show how other libraries can leave the past behind and roll into the future by ditching paper request forms and embracing technology to help build collections. Attendees will learn about the technical process and why it might work well for their own purposes. 

Speakers
avatar for Alison Lampley

Alison Lampley

Resource Sharing and Acquisitions Librarian, East Tennesee State University



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Using Technology to Facilitate Pre-Acquisition Workflows for Electronic Resources
Investigation of new e-resource requests before a purchase decision is made can be very complex, potentially involving gathering information from various parties (publishers/vendors, library stakeholders), setting up a trial, gathering trial feedback, and making sure stakeholders are notified in a timely manner throughout of the investigation process.    The University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) Libraries approached this management challenge by creating a dynamic online form.  With its front end originated in InfoPath and its backend database & workflow controlled in SharePoint, this form allows an automated process covering request submission, product evaluation, collection development review, trial setup, and selection decision.  All the information regarding a specific request is gathered into this form, with automated email notifications to stakeholders at each major step of the process.  The front end of the form is designed to be very simple and user-friendly, requiring only three pieces of information from liaison librarians: purchase request title, reason for request, and college with interest. 

Since the form was launched in July 2015, 73 requests have been submitted.  This new form has saved a lot of staff time in managing and communicating about e-journal/e-resource requests, which translates to improved services to liaison librarians and library users.
The posterr will address the challenge of managing pre-acquisition activities, discuss UNR's homegrown solution, and encourage attendees to share their experiences.

Speakers
PY

Paoshan Yue

Head, E-Resources & Acquisitions, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries
Paoshan Yue is the Head of Electronic Resources & Acquisitions Services at the University of Nevada, Reno Libraries.



Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

6:00pm

Where Is the Library Budget Going?: Using the Fund Code Structure in Your ILS to Demonstrate Fiscal Accountabilty and Track Format Migration
Our collections continue to migrate to an online environment, but often administrators outside the library (or even in it) are tied to fiscal concepts that do not reflect new formats and modes of access.  Administrators look at electronic resource expenditures and don't always understand that they are not just for databases, but also for ejournals and ebooks that can be subscribed to or owned.  Fund code structures that are built into our ILS systems can be used to demonstrate how resource budgets are expended by format and subject, which can then be tied into more formal assessment and analysis of each type of resource. The fund code properties of III's Sierra will be used to demonstrate how to build a structure to track expenditures by subject and format and that can be modified with the addition of new codes as modes of access and ownership evolve.


Thursday November 3, 2016 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

7:00pm

Annual Conference Reception
Sponsored by Gale, a Cengage Company

Charleston is well known for its hospitality, and the Annual Reception is a true Charleston affair! The reception will be held at the South Carolina Aquarium. Be entertained by an intimate look at many of South Carolina’s native animals and plants as your journey through the Aquarium takes you from the mountains to the sea. You’ll encounter surprises around every corner and an experience straight from the island of Madagascar is closer than you imagine. The Shark Shallows 20,000 gallon touch tank exhibit will also be open to attendees.

We are excited to host a book signing event for authors of several new books published in the Charleston Insights in Library, Archival, and Information Sciences series. Authors and books to be announced soon. Delicious lowcountry specialties as well as more familiar reception fare will be served. Beer, wine, and soft drinks provided at the bar.

Shuttle transportation will be provided. Pick up one of the shuttles at any conference location and let the driver know you wish to attend the reception at the aquarium. We can't wait to see you there!


Thursday November 3, 2016 7:00pm - 9:00pm
South Carolina Aquarium 100 Aquarium Wharf, Charleston, SC 29401

7:30pm

Ghostly Stroll Walking Tour
Reservations Required; $20 per person

Charleston is believed to be a most haunted place. The city has experienced numerous natural and manmade disasters in its long history; stories and legends of great fear, suffering, and death abound. The historic district with hundreds of old buildings provides familiar settings for spirits to revisit and haunt. Charleston, called the “Holy City”, is known for its beautiful historic churches – whose graveyards hold many secrets and horrors. Beguiling tales will take you back to a time when life was tenuous, survival uncertain. Come hear legends from the past and take in the beautiful ambiance of Charleston at night. (1 1/2 hour tour)

Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides for the tours. All tours are $20 per person and payment may be made in cash or check at tour time.  Reservations for all tours may be made at broadstreettours.com.  Tours must have a minimum of 6 people to go.


Thursday November 3, 2016 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Library Society 64 King Street, Charleston, SC 29401
 
Friday, November 4
 

7:00am

Registration Check-In
Please check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

 The desk will be open the following hours:

  • Wednesday, 11/2, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
  • Thursday, 11/3, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
  • Friday, 11/4, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
  • Saturday, 11/5: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Friday November 4, 2016 7:00am - 7:00pm
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Friday November 4, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

8:30am

Announcements and Opening Remarks
Friday November 4, 2016 8:30am - 8:35am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

8:35am

Reimagining Our World At Planetary Scale: The Big Data Future Of Our Libraries
What happens when massive computing power brings together an ever-growing cross-section of the world’s information in realtime, from news media to social media, books to academic literature, the world’s libraries to the web itself, machine translates all of that material as it arrives, and applies a vast array of algorithms to identify the events and emotions, actors and narratives and their myriad connections that define the planet to create a living silicon replica of global society? The GDELT Project (http://gdeltproject.org/), supported by Google Zigsaw, is the largest open data initiative in the world focusing on cataloging and modeling global human society, offering a first glimpse at what this emerging “big data” understanding of society looks like.  Operating the world’s largest open deployments of streaming machine translation, sentiment analysis, geocoding, image analysis and event identification, coupled with perhaps the world’s largest program to catalog local media, the GDELT Project monitors worldwide news media, emphasizing small local outlets, live machine translating all coverage it monitors in 65 languages, flagging mentions of people and organizations, cataloging relevant imagery, video, and social posts, converting textual mentions of location to mappable geographic coordinates, identifying millions of themes and thousands of emotions, extracting over 300 categories of physical events, collaborating with the Internet Archive to preserve online news and making all of this available in a free open data firehose of human society.  This is coupled with a massive socio-cultural contextualization dataset codified from more than 21 billion words of academic literature spanning most unclassified US Government publications, the open web, and more than 2,200 journals representing the majority of humanities and social sciences research on Africa and the Middle East over the last half century. The world’s largest open deep learning image cataloging initiative, totaling more than 150 million images, inventories the world’s news imagery in realtime, identifying the objects, activities, locations, words and emotions defining the world’s myriad visual narratives and allowing them for the first time to be explored alongside traditional textual narratives. Used by governments, NGOs, scholars, journalists, and ordinary citizens across the world to identify breaking situations, map evolving conflicts, model the undercurrents of unrest, explore the flow of ideas and narratives across borders, and even forecast future unrest, the GDELT Project constructs a realtime global catalog of behavior and beliefs across every country, connecting the world’s information into a single massive ever-evolving realtime network capturing what's happening around the world, what its context is and who's involved, and how the world is feeling about it, every single day. Here’s what it looks like to conduct data analytics at a truly planetary scale and the incredible new insights we gain about the daily heartbeat of our global world and what we can learn about the role of libraries in our big data future.

Moderators
avatar for James O'Donnell

James O'Donnell

University Librarian & Professor, Arizona State University Libraries
James J. O'Donnell is the University Librarian at ASU Libraries.He has published widely on the history and culture of the late antique Mediterranean world and is a recognized innovator in the application of networked information technology in higher education. In 1990, he co-founded Bryn Mawr Classical Review, the second on-line scholarly journal in the humanities ever created. In 1994, he taught an Internet-based seminar on the work of Augustine... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kalev Leetaru

Kalev Leetaru

Senior Fellow, Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, Georgetown University
One of Foreign Policy Magazine's Top 100 Global Thinkers of 2013, Kalev is a Senior Fellow at the George Washington University Center for Cyber & Homeland Security and a member of its Counterterrorism and Intelligence Task Force, as well as being a 2015-2016 Google Developer Expert for Google Cloud Platform. From 2013-2014 he was the Yahoo! Fellow in Residence of International Values, Communications Technology & the Global Internet at... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 8:35am - 9:10am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:10am

Hyde Park Debate - Resolved: APC-Funded Open Access is Antithetical to the Values of Librarianship
In Favor: Alison Scott, UC Riverside
Opposed: Michael Levine-Clark, University of Denver

The debate will be conducted in general accordance with Oxford Union rules. All in the audience will vote their opinion on the resolution before the debate begins using text message voting, and the vote totals will be recorded. Each speaker will offer a formal opening statement, followed by a response to each other's statements, and then we'll open the floor to discussion. At the conclusion of the debate, another vote will be taken. The winner of the debate is the one who caused the most audience members to change their votes. Members of the audience have an opportunity to make comments and pose questions as well. Join us for what is sure to be a lively discussion, and come ready to share your opinions! 

Moderators
avatar for Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of Utah
Rick Anderson is Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources & Collections in the J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. He earned his B.S. and M.L.I.S. degrees at Brigham Young University, and has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno. He serves on numerous editorial... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine Clark

Michael Levine Clark

Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation. 
avatar for Alison Scott

Alison Scott

Associate University Librarian for Collections & Scholarly Communication, University of California, Riverside
Alison has strategic responsibility for the ways and means by which the University of California, Riverside Library’s collections grow and change. Alison joined the UCR Library in 2014, following services as Head of Collection Development for the George Washington University Libraries, Charles Warren Bibliographer for American History at Harvard University, and Head of the Popular Culture Library at Bowling Green State University. She holds a... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 9:10am - 9:55am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:30am

General History Walking Tour
Reservations Required; $20 per person

This tour gives a general overview of Charleston’s history from the colonial era onward – through the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, to the city’s rediscovery and revitalization of the past 40 years. Participants will gain insight into Charleston’s early wealth and culture, viewing the city’s impressive public buildings and private mansions. Visitors will learn of architectural influences and other factors that resulted in modifications to original structures, with explanation of the single house, the double house and dependencies. (2 hour tour)

Lee Ann Bain and Carol Ezell-Gilson will be your guides for the tours. All tours are $20 per person and payment may be made in cash or check at tour time.  Reservations for all tours may be made at broadstreettours.com.  Tours must have a minimum of 6 people to go.


Friday November 4, 2016 9:30am - 11:30am
Washington Park 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:55am

Presentation of Vicky Speck Leadership Award

Vicky Speck ABC-CLIO Leadership Award is awarded every year to a leader in the Charleston Conference who has made a lasting contribution to the Conference’s mission. The award has been granted annually since 2006 – Anthony Watkinson (2006), Jack Montgomery (2007), Beth Bernhardt (2008), Heather Miller (2009), Eleanor Cook (2010), Glenda Alvin (2011), Ramune Kubilius (2012), Audrey Powers (2013), Leah Hinds (2014), and Tony Horava (2015).


Friday November 4, 2016 9:55am - 10:00am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:00am

Refreshment Break


Friday November 4, 2016 10:00am - 10:20am
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

10:20am

Charleston Fast Pitch Competition
Modeled on venture capital funding competitions, the CHARLESTON FAST PITCH COMPETITION will provide two monetary awards of $2,500 to further support the development and implementation of compelling library innovations. Finalists will present their projects to a panel of experts and Charleston Conference attendees for feedback and to determine the two grand prize winners.

Come prepared to hear pitches from the four finalists and to vote for your favorite using text message voting. 

More information about the application process. 

Moderators
avatar for Steve Goodall

Steve Goodall

Founder and President, The Goodall Family Foundation
Stephen (Steve) Goodall is the retired President and CEO of J.D. Power and Associates, a leading market research firm specializing in customer satisfaction and buyer behavior. He started his career at J.D. Power in 1978 and opened the company’s first satellite office in Detroit, Michigan in 1988. He was named President in 1996 and served as President and CEO until 2008, leading the company’s global expansion as well as diversification... Read More →
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor to CRL, Center for Research Libraries
Ann Okerson joined the Center for Research Libraries in fall 2011 as Senior Advisor on Electronic Strategies, working with that organization to reconfigure and redirect various existing programs into digital mode. Previous experience includes 15 years as Associate University Librarian for Collections & International Programs at Yale University; prior to that she worked in the commercial sector, and also for 5 years as Senior Program Officer for... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for James O'Donnell

James O'Donnell

University Librarian & Professor, Arizona State University Libraries
James J. O'Donnell is the University Librarian at ASU Libraries.He has published widely on the history and culture of the late antique Mediterranean world and is a recognized innovator in the application of networked information technology in higher education. In 1990, he co-founded Bryn Mawr Classical Review, the second on-line scholarly journal in the humanities ever created. In 1994, he taught an Internet-based seminar on the work of Augustine... Read More →
avatar for Anthea Stratigos

Anthea Stratigos

Co-founder & CEO, Outsell, Inc.
Anthea C. Stratigos co-founded Outsell, Inc. with Gregory Chagaris, creating the leading research and advisory firm focused exclusively on media, information, and technology. She established the company’s research agenda and served as the firm’s first chief analyst. As CEO, she draws upon her deep experience in research and analytic businesses to drive product development, operations, marketing, and general management to lead all facets of... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 10:20am - 11:20am
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

A Model for Patron Driven Acquisition of Print Music Scores: From Conception to Reality
This presentation will explore the process of developing a unique Patron Driven Acquisition Program for PRINT music scores and monographs from concept to reality at an American Association of Research Libraries institution. Areas to be discussed include collection development considerations, information technology infrastructure needs, acquisitions workflows, and plan evaluation. The presentation will examine how partnering with a vendor to implement an innovative collection development plan can support the needs of the library users and the goals of library collection development officers and increase access to music scores and monographs in a fiscally responsible way. Presentation attendees can expect to learn about the opportunities and challenges that the library and vendor faced in implementing the plan, outcomes and evaluation, and steps for the future.

Speakers
avatar for Alan  Asher

Alan Asher

Music Librarian, University of Florida



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

A Running Start: A Crowd-Sourced Database of Due Diligence to Invoke Section 108
Starting in the late 1970s academic libraries built collections of VHS titles with an emphasis on supporting classroom teaching. On average academic libraries have more than 3000 VHS tapes.

Eclipsed by robust and rapid adoption of DVDs, the VHS era is now over. But a crisis is welling for libraries. Of the hundreds of thousands of VHS recordings commercially released, a substantial number never were released on DVD or in streaming format. To compound matters, industry experts estimate that various forces converge against VHS (age of tapes, irreparable and irreplaceable equipment, retirement of VHS technicians) ultimately making the format inaccessible by 2027.

Under Section 108 of US Copyright law libraries have an available remedy to this problem. The law allows duplication of content that is lost, damaged, stolen, deteriorating, or in an obsolete format. A library, however, cannot simply begin digitizing all their VHS tapes. Section 108 requires that, prior to duplication, a reasonable search be conducted to determine that an unused copy of the title is not available at a fair price, and evidence of that search should be kept.

This session presents a cooperative database, established to capture the search efforts for current distribution of VHS video titles, and to identify titles eligible for duplication under Section 108.

The crowd-sourced database is available now for others to jump start their own preservation efforts but others are invited to contribute. The metadata available through the database can serve as a foundation for coordinated digitization efforts.

Speakers
avatar for deg farrelly

deg farrelly

Media Librarian, Arizona State University Libraries
With 40 years experience as a media librarian deg farrelly provides a unique perspective on video in academic libraries. He is the author of “Streaming Video” in the book Rethinking Collection Development and Management, (published by ABC-Clio) and co-investigator in the 2013 and 2015 national surveys of academic library streaming video. (Results of the 2013 survey presented at the Charleston Conference and published in Against the... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

A Tale of Two Serials Cancellations
Beginning in 2016, both WWU and GWU found that they needed to make significant and similar reductions in continuations costs over the next five years. In response, this past year, both institutions took independent, significant steps toward these ends, developing systematic, sustainable procedures for addressing these reductions. The approaches taken by the two institutions will be compared and contrasted in this presentation, particularly with respect to the following questions, which both libraries encountered:
• What defines a ‘successful’ cancellation process in 2016?
• What are the most effective approaches to cancelling serials?
• When do cancellations do 'least harm' to students and faculty? After cancellations, how is access to content affected to the smallest degree possible?
• Did the cancellation process have the appearance of fairness to stakeholders? How does a library foster university buy-in?
• What do successful negotiations with publishers look like?

Members of the team will discuss:
• criteria for possible retention or cancellation
• different assessment methods utilized
• communication with subject liaisons and disciplinary teams
• outreach to and response from faculty
The panel will also address lessons learned from their efforts, as well as future plans in a continuing flat budget scenario.

Speakers
avatar for Debbie Bezanson

Debbie Bezanson

Senior Research Librarian, George Washington University
DK

David Killian

Collection Development and Reference Librarian, George Washington University
RK

Robin Kinder

Reference and Collection Development Librarian, George Washington University
MO

Mike Olson

Director of Scholarly Resources & Collection Services, Western Washington University Libraries


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Big Data 2.0: Critical Roles for Libraries and Librarians
Big Data is a live issue in e-commerce and market intelligence, e-government and politics, national security, and smart healthcare; a key feature of digital scholarship and open science; and an emergent concern for education and the cultural heritage sectors. Big Data 2.0 raises the stakes: the convergence of e-science with business intelligence, crowdsourcing, data analytics, social media, and Web2.0 technologies allows broader and deeper applications, involving cooperative processing of structured and unstructured data. Hype around the "data talent gap" highlights a shortage of candidates for data science jobs with the requisite computational and analytical skills, but informed observers point to an equally critical need for competence in digital curation to ensure proper stewardship of data, best done by institutions with preservation know-how. Libraries already provide data literacy education, research data services, data mining support, and open linked data, but should now engage with the Big Data initiatives launched in the US and globally as collaborative, interdisciplinary, cross-sector endeavors predicated on large-scale community participation. The session will explain how data-intensive research is moving to new levels of technical and organizational complexity, promising advances in human knowledge for the benefit of society, but raising critical issues for institutions and individuals relevant to information professionals. It will describe salient characteristics of Big Data megaprojects and explore opportunities for library involvement. Participants will be invited to share experiences of Big Data and consider potential responses to the challenges presented. They will gain fuller understanding of large-scale big data projects and their implications for libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Sheila Corrall

Sheila Corrall

Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Information Culture & Data Stewardship
Sheila Corrall worked in UK public, special, and national libraries in acquisitions, cataloging, reference and information services, before moving into higher education, where she served as university librarian at two institutions and as CIO at a large research university. In 2004, she became Professor of Library & Information Management at the University of Sheffield, then head of the Sheffield iSchool, before moving to the US in 2012 to lead... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Book Usage is Rollin' Down: Multifaceted Assessment of Monograph Collection Performance to Optimize Purchase Decisions
Georgia State University's print circulation has declined over 50% since 2010. Collection development librarians made several small-scale adjustments to address this trend, yet the drop off in use continued unabated. We had to totally rethink the book budget. In order to make changes strategically and responsibly, we needed answers to a variety of questions: Who is using the books? Are there disciplines that do not need firm order allocations, or even monographs? Does format matter? Does it matter how the titles are acquired (approval vs. firm order vs. DDA)?

This session will discuss the multifaceted data-driven analysis we developed in order to provide a detailed and holistic picture of monograph collection performance and buying patterns. For example, we analyzed use of the monograph collection broken down by spending categories, format, and LC class, but also compared usage of the entire collection to the performance of the recently acquired titles. A more qualitative component of the project involved recording the decisions underlying the subject librarians' FY16 purchases. We will share how we developed our analysis, what our data has revealed, surprises within the project, and the action items generated by our activities. We hope to generate a discussion among audience members about how others have approached and addressed the problem of declining print circulation.

Speakers
TC

Tricia Clayton

Collection Services Librarian, Georgia State University
Tricia Clayton is the Collection Services Librarian at Georgia State University located in downtown Atlanta. As a member of the Collection Development  department, her primary responsibilities include collection assessment, wrangling and interpreting usage statistics, and overseeing Interlibrary Loan. Previously, she was the history librarian at GSU and a reference and electronic resources librarian at Oglethorpe University. She obtained her MLS... Read More →
SH

Skye Hardesty

Department Head, Collection Development, Georgia State University
As department head, Skye is responsible for managing collection assessment and development activities at the library. She has worked at GSU since 2003, first as a science librarian and then in collection development. Skye received her MLIS from the University of Texas at Austin and is an avid cookbook collector, reader of crime fiction, and drinker of fancy beer.



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Collection Development Environmental Scan: A Strategy for Informed Decision Making
The researchers conducted an environmental scan of thirteen of Washington State University Libraries' peer institutions. The set of chosen libraries were similar to WSU in size and scope (e.g., a similar land-grant mission, or a veterinary school without a law school or a medical school). The libraries surveyed were drawn from members of the Association of American Universities (AAU), the Washington State Legislative Peer Set, and WSU's Global Challenge State Peers.

Surveys and follow-up interviews covered a broad range of collection development issues including details about administration, policies and procedures, the place of Interlibrary Loans in collection development, Big Deals, open access, textbooks, and open educational resources. Questions regarding collection funding sources, fees, and storage facilities were also covered.

This session will report on the surveys and interviews collected and show how they can inform collection managers' decision-making and collections strategy during a period of rapid change and tight budget times by providing details about how other academic libraries are handling assessments, Big Deal conversations, and journal cancellations.

Speakers
JC

Joel Cummings

Head of Collection Development, Washington State University Libraries
Joel Cummings has worked at Washington State University since 1999, first as an electronic resources librarian, then collection manager for the sciences and now Head of Collection Development. Previous positions include reference and instruction librarian at University College of the Fraser Valley, corporate librarian at ID Biomedical and information specialist at Nova Chemicals.  He received an MLIS from the University of British... Read More →
LC

Lara Cummings

Agriculture and Instruction Librarian, Washington State University Libraries
CZ

Christy Zlatos

Liaison Librarian, Washington State University Libraries


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Current Collection Development Strategies for Video
Collecting video content today poses challenges for the academic library. Diverse missions lead to very different collection development needs across academic libraries. Large research institutions may desire to collect for perpetuity, while smaller collections are often more curriculum-focused. Video collection strategies vary based on mission, budget, technological infrastructure, and other factors. Acquiring video content is complicated by the variety of formats and licensing options the academic librarian must take into consideration. In this panel, academic librarians who collect video content will discuss collecting to support research now and in the future, collecting to support curricular needs, and collaboration between institutions for cooperative collection decisions. We will discuss our strategies for maximizing budgets and address the philosophy of access versus ownership. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and provide additional ideas for ways that librarians can enhance and improve video acquisition.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah E. McCleskey

Sarah E. McCleskey

Head of Access Services, Hofstra University Library
Copyright, resource sharing, streaming video, weeding, collection analysis
avatar for Winifred Metz

Winifred Metz

Head, Media Resources Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
At UNC, Winifred consults on media production, analysis and consumption, leveraging the use of film, television and new media for instruction and research.
avatar for Danette  Pachtner

Danette Pachtner

Librarian for Film, Video & Digital Media, Duke University
Danette is the subject librarian for Film, Video & Digital Media and Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University's Lilly Library. A San Francisco native, she received her undergraduate degree at Wesleyan University and her MLIS at UCLA.


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Digital Research Practices: The Real User Experience: A Collaborative Library/Publisher Initiative
The last decade has seen rapid growth in the amount of information available online. For the academic community, this explosion of content has significantly changed the way students and researchers alike find and use information. Having access to digital information - and understanding how best to use that information - is particularly crucial to postgraduate students starting new research projects.

In order to better understand how students use information in their research, Loughborough University and Taylor & Francis Group undertook a joint project to capture the PhD research student's User Experience (UX). Over the course of 12 months, 10 research students from Loughborough University kept diaries and attended focus groups where their views, experiences, and approaches to using information were captured. Their experience with scholarly communication was a significant focus of these activities, along with evaluating different publisher platforms and reflecting on how Open Access and social media channels could be used to meet their research needs.

During this session, Graham Walton, Assistant Director for Academic and User Services at Loughborough University Library, and Stacy Stanislaw, Library Communications Manager at Taylor & Francis Group, will provide an overview of this collaborative project, discussing the idea that academic libraries and publishers can help improve the researcher experience in discovering and navigating online content. The session will also look at the process behind and results of this project, along with lessons learned and insights gathered into the real User eXperience. Finally, the presentation will include time for questions and feedback from the audience on the project.

Speakers
avatar for Stacy Stanislaw

Stacy Stanislaw

Library Communications Manager, The Americas, Taylor & Francis Group
I am the Library Communications Manager at Taylor & Francis Group and am responsible for managing the library marketing and communications activities for North and South America. I first joined Taylor & Francis in 2008 as the manager of the library and information science journals portfolio and have implemented several open access programs, including Taylor & Francis’ Library & Information Sciences Author Rights Pilot Program, a zero embargo... Read More →
avatar for Graham Walton

Graham Walton

Honorary Research Fellow, Loughborough University
I have worked in libraries since 1971 and enjoyed every (well, nearly) every minute. Research and/or evaluation and/or impact assessment has always been an interest. A continual driver over the past 30 years has been to capture people's changing information seeking behaviours and then to adapt, change and develop services accordingly. I also enjoy my work as Editor of the peer reviewed journal 'New Review of Academic Librarianship'. In 2016 I... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

From DDA to EBA: A Five-year Story from a Consortium Shared E-Book Collection Program
Maintaining an e-book program at a consortium level is complex. Considerations include ensuring a broad range of useful content is available, stable costs, and minimizing barriers to access for patrons.

This session will look at Orbis Cascade Alliance's experience and evolution across the last five years in testing and assessing different e-book models. The presenters will provide their perspective on how the Alliance is influenced by and influences the e-book ecosystem at large. They will share lessons and reflect upon their successfully run Demand Driven Acquisition approach, and share why they decided to pilot an Evidenced Based Acquisition approach with Wiley.

Attendees can expect to learn how this consortium continues to evolve their approaches with the ever-changing e-book collection acquisition world.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina DeShazo

Kristina DeShazo

Collection Development and Assessment Librarian, Oregon Health & Science University
I recently moved into my new role as Collection Development & Assessment Librarian at OHSU. I oversee the collection using review, analysis, and assessment to ensure that the library provides resources to meet the needs of the OHSU community.
avatar for Kathi Fountain

Kathi Fountain

Program Manager, Orbis Cascade Alliance
I'm a 3-year veteran of the Alliance, where I have managed the consortium's e-book program, electronic resources activities, and shared collections initiatives. When not manipulating spreadsheets and writing emails, I can be found taking my son on adventures, walking my two dogs, and cooking. || | The Orbis Cascade Alliance is a 39-member academic library consortium in the Pacific Northwest.
avatar for Jim Huenniger

Jim Huenniger

Senior Account Manager, John Wiley & Sons
I have the pleasure to work with academic libraries across the western states, including the Orbis Cascade Alliance, SCELC, CDL and GWLA. | | Wiley understands that the needs of researchers and their communities are rapidly evolving, and we continue to offer flexible solutions to help service and support your library collection building initiatives.



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

From the Concept to Results: A Case Study on the Collection Development for the ODC - Opening Day Collection at Qatar National Library
"A library collection should fit the mission for which it is created. The number of books it holds does not determine its worth." (E. J. Loveland, 2000)

If so, how do we create a National Library and how do we build its collection from scratch? Since 2012, when the plans for the new national library were announced, Qatar National Library (QNL) envisioned as carrying out its mission to: "spread knowledge, nurture imagination, cultivate creativity, and preserve the nation's heritage for future generations."

This presentation will focus on the 3 years' experience of selection, acquisition, and processing of library materials, in a perspective of achieving the Opening Day Collection. We would like to share a preliminary outcome of building a library collection in Arabic, English, and other languages in record time; facing challenges in negotiations (long-term vendors and single sources), logistics (building a library collection without a building), and business culture (visions, working style in a Middle East Business culture/context). We will discuss our various acquisition methods (i.e., blanket and firm orders, donations, gifts and exchanges, Spot purchases from Book Fairs, personal contacts, etc.), highlighting both the challenges and the rewards. General statistics and timelines will be provided to elucidate the intended target and achievements to date. The systems used to support this mission are also highlighted with details enough but not to compromise aspects necessary for future significant milestone reports of QNL. It is expected that the QNL acquisitions program will more than meet its intended targets for the ODC.

Attendees should come away with an understanding of the issues and processes related to the acquisitions of international materials. In addition, we hope to generate a discussion with the audience about alternative experiences and processes in creating a library collection from the scratch.

Speakers
avatar for Katarzyna Dudek

Katarzyna Dudek

Acquisitions Librarian, Qatar National Library
Katarzyna is the Acquisitions Librarian at Qatar National Library located in the Education City, Doha, Qatar. As a member of the Technical Services and Acquisition department, her primary responsibilities include collection assessment, ordering and processing all types of library materials. Previously, she worked as librarian in periodicals department in College of Europe library (Warsaw, Poland) and assistant librarian in the Central Library... Read More →
avatar for Henry Owino

Henry Owino

Head of Library Acquisitions, Qatar National Library



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Moving Altmetrics Mainstream: How to Bring Recommended Practice into Reality
The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has published final recommendations regarding alternative metrics that have been developed over the past two years. Publishing these recommendations is only the beginning of the process. To be truly successful, these recommendations need to be adopted into practice. During this talk, Todd will discuss those definitions, the recommendations, and the new altmetrics data quality code of conduct. These publications serve as a point to push forward adoption and next steps to further advance acceptance of new forms of metrics and assessment of new forms of communicating information. Finally, consideration will be given in areas of work that the community still has before us, and audience input will be solicited to create further discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Director for Programs, National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Director for Programs at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior to joining NISO in 2011, Nettie worked at Ex Libris, where she served for 11 years in a number of library and information provider-facing roles, working on link... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Rolling in the Deep: Negotiating to Have It All
We *all* negotiate! Negotiating is happening all around you. You do it every day. This panel of negotiation experts come from libraries of all different sizes and places. Each will reflect on how learning and understanding negotiation skills from the online course "Negotiation Skills for Librarians" taught by Sarah Durrant has made us each a better librarian. Each expert will give real-life examples of applying learned negotiating skills to their day-to-day work, including publisher and vendor negotiations. Topics will illustrate strategies from the course, such as publisher profiling, understanding the four cornerstones of negotiation, putting principles of negotiation into practice, and looking at ways to evaluate success. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions. Attendees will leave with a much better understanding of what it takes to negotiate in all aspects of work life, and how to remain resilient through it all.

Speakers
avatar for Kristina Alayan

Kristina Alayan

Head of Content Acquisitions and Management, Georgetown Law Library
JC

Jennifer Carroll

Collection Management Librarian, University of New Hampshire
avatar for Aaron Lupton

Aaron Lupton

Electronic Resources Librarian, York University
I have been the Electronic Resources Librarian at York University in Toronto since 2009. I am involved in negotiating licenses and purchases of all electronic materials in York's collections. I also have an interest in all matters pertaining to assessment, especially collections assessment and measuring student success.
avatar for Ronda Rowe

Ronda Rowe

UT System Licensing and Communications Librarian, University of Texas at Austin
Ronda Rowe is the UT System Licensing and Communications Librarian for the University of Texas Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. In this position, she is responsible for developing and implementing effective and efficient license negotiations and processing for the UT System Digital Library (UTSDL) across all UT System institutions. She also manages the public and internal web pages.



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Shotgun Sessions: Collection Development Analysis & Assessment and Discovery of Collections Threads
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature 5 PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1. Retention Modeling for the Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust (EAST) (Anna Perrici)

How do you get 40 diverse libraries to agree on a model for shared print retention in 8 weeks? This lively overview will demonstrate the process of forming and refining such a model for retention of monographs, using collection analysis and visualization software. The Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust (EAST) is a partnership of 48 academic libraries, 40 of which are committing to retain titles on behalf of all EAST members for a minimum of 15 years.  EAST seeks to maintain access to the scholarly record through sustained cooperation between partner libraries.  

Hear how the project team worked with partner libraries, the vendor for collection analysis software (Sustainable Collection Services), working group members and EAST governance to refine and adopt a model for retaining over 6 million scholarly monographs. The key elements of the final model will be covered as well major lessons learned.

When this proposal was written the collection analysis project had just transitioned to the retention allocation and commitment phase.  More details and specifics on lessons learned will be available by the time this shotgun sessions occurs.

2. The Past is Prologue:   What 50 Years of History can tell us about the Future of Collection Development (David Sharp) 

This shotgun session will handpick a collection of eighteen of the most informative, peculiar, and self-evident insights that I learned during my sabbatical leave.  I reviewed five decades worth of collection development history, data and practice at Carleton University Library (Ottawa, Canada).  In the process,  I discovered things about both the distant and recent past that might help prepare us for some of the challenges of the future.     

Topics of discussion will include inflation, exchange rates, staffing, the perception and reality of tough economic times, why you should care about furniture budget, austerity versus fiscal stimulus, the unabated growth of e-resources, transparency and assessment, user-centered collection development models, audits, and more.  

The presentation will combine easy-to-interpret visuals with clear talking points to covey its information.  It will be of interest to library staff, who can generalize from Carleton's history and can import the lessons to be had to their own institutions; and of interest to vendors and publishers, who can take in a six minute "long view" of a university library and the challenges it has and will continue to face.
 
3. Validation Sample Study for Shared Print Collection - Is It There? (Gwen Verkuilen-Chevalier)

The Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust Shared Print project conducted a Validation Study in the spring of 2016 to determine an "availability metric" and average condition of circulating print materials in the 40 retention partner libraries.  This talk will cover the methodology and results of this validation study, how it played into the retention model being used by EAST, and touch on how Google App Scripts was used to create a front end to Google Sheets for a live data collection tool and administrative dashboard. 

4. Know Your Collections! : Rebuilding a Discovery Service and an Open URL Resolver (Judith Nagata) 

Building and maintaining a library collection is only valuable if the students, faculty, and staff can find and use those resources. Therefore, maintenance of discovery services is an integral part of the daily workflow of acquisitions, collection maintenance, and assessment. Access to collections is lost when either collection or discovery services management falters.  This session will demonstrate how a medium-sized academic library with limited library staff rebuilt both their discovery service and their open url resolver. Discussion will include the importance of both selecting appropriate search and retrieval metadata as well as including the correct collections (at a title level) for full text access. It also will provide information on the decision making process that made the project manageable and possible to complete in seven months. 

5. Everything I want to say about Open Access in 6 minutes 40 seconds (John Dove) 

In June of last year I jumped head-long into the world of Open Access. I've watched from the sidelines these past several decades. I come from a family with three generations of academics across STEM, Social Sciences and Humanities. I have real passion for seeing the results of scholarship be freely available to all of society without limitations. In 6 minutes and 40 seconds I'm going to share with you what I've learned about the current state of Open Access and what I think the path forward is to accomplishing some of the benefits of open access in my lifetime.

Moderators
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

AIP Publishing

Speakers
avatar for John G Dove

John G Dove

Consultant, Paloma & Associates
I'm best known for the role I had in building Credo Reference into a well-respected online reference tool for libraries that is deeply linked into the resources of its host library--thereby serving one of the important features of an online encyclopedia. | | Since leaving Credo at the end of 2014 I have begun writing and speaking about Open Access (see posts on my LinkedIn profile). I've put particular emphasis on ways in which the... Read More →
avatar for Judith Nagata

Judith Nagata

Electronic Resources Librarian, Coastal Carolina University
I am managing all of the electronic resources (ebooks, ejournals, databases, streaming media) for Coastal Carolina University. I also manage the access points via discovery services, the library website and the catalog. I am interested in learning more about ways to manage collections with a limited staff and especially how to set up an electronic resources management system efficiently.
avatar for Anna Perricci

Anna Perricci

Project Manager, Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust / Boston Library Consortium
avatar for David Sharp

David Sharp

Head, Collection Development and Acquisitions, Carleton University Library
GV

Gwen Verkuilen-Chevalier

Head of Collection Development and User Services, Saint Anselm College



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Social Scholarship?: Academic Communications in the Digital Age
Scholars and scientists today are urged to build online identities, to promote their work on social media, and to track its impact via altmetrics. So too is academic writing seen as a social location, or a place for interaction on work at its different stages (as in "versioning," or the public composition of an article or book). Indeed, new projects for the design of innovative digital publishing formats, including those sponsored by the Mellon Foundation, are promoting such a social, collaborative, or participatory approach to complement the introduction of multi-media into scholarly monographs. But not all scholars and scientists, however much they welcome open access publishing and opportunities for networking, are enthusiastic about social scholarship. Some favor the durability of traditional academic habits and others note the limits of interest, particularly in science, for online conversation about research across many platforms. And there is anxiety too about the role of social media in faculty evaluation. This session will offer first an account of competing positions on social scholarship, aimed at helping participants see different views of our digital situation and future. Participants will then be invited to consider the extent to which scholarship can be fruitfully social, and the meanings of social scholarship for academic libraries, in these and other activities: designing and managing institutional repositories, guiding the faculty in the uses of bibliographic management software and altmetrics, evaluating emerging e-publishing initiatives featuring their social dimensions, and exploring prospects for library publishing itself.


Speakers
SW

Steven Weiland

Professor of Higher Education, Michigan State University


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

The Sky's the Limit: Scholarly Communication, Digital Initiatives, Institutional Repositories, and Subject Librarians
The University of Central Florida's institutional repository, STARS (Showcase of Text, Archives, Research & Scholarship), has presented new opportunities for collaboration amongst the Libraries' Office of Scholarly Communication, Digital Initiatives, Research Services, and Subject Librarians. Building on efforts to proactively promote scholarly communication initiatives to the university community, these four units have used the institutional repository as a foundation for collaboration, outreach, marketing and educational efforts. This presentation will give an overview of STARS and highlight the role the IR has in increasing the collaborative efforts of these four units.

A four person panel representing four different perspectives will discuss strategies designed to generate IR interest and content from the university community. Successful ventures and lessons learned will provide insight into creating a productive inter-departmental framework that is geared towards supporting student and faculty IR projects. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and share ideas from their own IR perspectives. After participating in this program, attendees will be able to develop winning IR collaboration strategies for their own institution.

Speakers
avatar for Lee Dotson

Lee Dotson

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Central Florida
Lee Dotson is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries. She has been the manager of STARS, UCF’s digital institutional repository, since it went live in the summer of 2015 and has had the opportunity to work with digital projects and repositories at UCF since the Libraries began digitization efforts in 1999. Her involvement has covered all aspects of digital collection building from scanning and OCR to... Read More →
avatar for Richard H. Harrison II

Richard H. Harrison II

Associate University Librarian, University of Central Florida
Richard Harrison has been an Associate University Librarian in the Research and Information Services department of the UCF Libraries since April 2001. | | During the 2003-2004 academic year, he served as a Senior Faculty Fellow in the UCF Provost’s office, working with the then Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Dean of Undergraduate Studies on a variety of undergraduate research initiatives, including the planning and coordination of... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Norris

Sarah Norris

Scholarly Communication Librarian, University of Central Florida
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head, Research and Information Services Dept., University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). | | Barbara was an Invited Speaker at the 2016 Japan Association of National University Libraries (JANUL) Symposium at the University of Tokyo where she presented "The Learning Commons... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:35am

Tower of Babel: New Realities in Foreign Language Acquisitions
Sourcing information and material from overseas can be a daunting and complex task, with real challenges posed by diverse and fragmented publishing markets and distribution realities as well as the need for foreign language skills. This panel session explores how specialist vendors' expertise and understanding of specific markets can assist librarians in their search for relevant material. Three vendors operating in three very distinct geographic areas will share their experience{s} and discuss how the unique {and fascinating} nature of their activity provides valuable support for successful collection development and continuity, from a common mission to varying services developed with a precise focus on their particular reality. Questions and comments from participants will be very welcome.

Moderators
avatar for Lynn Wiley

Lynn Wiley

Head of Acquisitions: Associate Professor University Libraries, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Speakers
avatar for Michele Casalini

Michele Casalini

CEO, Casalini Libri
Michele Casalini is CEO of the family-run company Casalini Libri, which supplies bibliographical data, books and journals to libraries, and offers e-content through the Torrossa platform, thanks to its dedicated Digital Division. | Following studies in Modern Languages and Literature at the University of Florence, and a period working with the publishing company La Nuova Italia, Michele specialised in the field of Information Technology and... Read More →
DR

Dirk Raes

Managing Director, Erasmus Boekhandel
ZS

Zina Somova

Director of Operations, EastView Information Services
Databases, books and serials in print and e-formats from countries of the former Soviet Union (Russia, Ukraine, etc.), Eastern Europe, East Asia (China, Korea, etc. and Middle East. Foreign language materials in all formats.



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

Wrangling Services Contracts in Libraries
When librarians speak of negotiating contracts, they usually are referring to licensed electronic resources, negotiating terms as advised in the Center for Research Libraries' LibLicense Model and other best practices. Comparatively overlooked in librarians' conversations about licensing are memberships and service agreements. The objective of this session is to tackle an essential but often overlooked element of collections management: wrangling contracted services, be they consortial memberships, hosting agreements, outsourced work, proxy solutions, or any of the myriad other services that libraries may contract out to support collections and discovery. Service agreements pose a dramatically different set of concerns and priorities from the usual concerns, such as perpetual access and ILL rights, which dominate library literature about licensing. Few of us would think to reduce liability by striking "membership" and writing "participation agreement" in its place. Even fewer would think to steer clear of allusions to "consortium," as the term has legal meaning distinct from its use in library parlance. Attendees will engage with the presenter and with one another not only through Q&A but also through extemporaneous workshopping of key questions about best practices. Attendees will leave this session with a clearer understanding of how to maximize value on investment and limit jeopardy on contracted services delivered to their organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Rodriguez

Michael Rodriguez

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Connecticut
Licensing, eresources, long-distance cycling, hiking, H. P. Lovecraft.



Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

11:35am

You Set the Scene: Three Faculty-centered Approaches to Digital Publishing from Mellon's 2014-2015 Scholarly Communications Initiative
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's 2014-2015 Scholarly Communications Initiative funded more than 13 projects of various sizes and orientations as part of an effort to strengthen the scholarly monograph publishing ecosystem in a time of increasing disruption. It has not always been obvious to onlookers if or how the projects funded by this experiment will ultimately connect, but a recent report from Simon Fraser University ("Reassembling Scholarly Communications: An Evaluation of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Monograph Initiative," May 2016) helps to clarify points of thematic alignment, overlap, and divergence among them. While many of the funded projects are explicitly based in university presses (with the goal of either enhancing existing monograph programs or developing digital capacity where little or none exists), three projects (those at Brown, the University of Connecticut, and the University of Illinois) are instead focused on developing digital publication capacity for faculty outside of the traditional press framework. The "You Set the Scene" session brings together members from each of these three projects to investigate unique and complementary dimensions of their work. The audience will learn about developing project outcomes and encouraged to participate in discussion related to large-scale shifts in structural and cultural approaches to faculty-led digital scholarship production and publication.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Lecturer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment, Bonn served as the associate university librarian for publishing at the University of Michigan Library, with responsibility for publishing and scholarly... Read More →
LG

Liz Glass

Digital Scholarship Editor, Brown University Library, Brown University
SS

Sara Sikes

Scholarly Communications Coordinator, University of Connecticut


Friday November 4, 2016 11:35am - 12:15pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:30pm

Rolling with a Purpose (16th Health Sciences Lively Lunch)
Sponsored by Rittenhouse

Moderator Deborah Blecic will convene this year’s hosted but no holds barred Lively Lunch session. She will provide a few general remarks and will highlight why this year’s three presentations are all relevant to this year’s conference theme. Time will be left for lively discussion between speakers and session attendees.

After a few words of greeting by the hosts, Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc., Ramune Kubilius will provide a brief (traditional) annual update of interesting and noteworthy trends in the health publishing and health information sectors that occurred or were noticed since the 2015 conference.

David Parker and Taney Shondel of Alexander Street will share some insights on providing online medical / health video content, including some inherent challenges and opportunities provided by this medium.

A few years ago, it could be argued that “more is better”, but in times of tightened collection budgeting, libraries often need to make strategic collection decisions. G. Randall Watts will share highlights of “Life After “The Big Deal” (first presented in a 2016 Medical Library Association (MLA) conference poster presentation).

Health professional education is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary. How can libraries anticipate and address the information and resource needs for the curricula of these programs? Elizabeth Hinton and Susan Clark will share highlights of “Designing a Library Resource Module for an Interprofessional Curriculum” (highlighting their experience, first described in a 2016 MLA conference poster).

Moderators
avatar for Deborah  Blecic

Deborah Blecic

Collections Coordinator, University of Illinois at Chicago
Deb has been at UIC since 1991.  She is a Distinguished Member of the Medical Library Association’s Academy of Health Information Professionals and won the 2005 Louise Darling Medal for Distinguished Achievement in Collection Development in the Health Sciences. She is the author of 15 peer-reviewed journal articles and numerous other publications and presentations. Deb’s current research focuses on the use of electronic resources.  Deb... Read More →

Speakers
SC

Susan Clark

Director, Rowland Medical Library, University of Mississippi Medical Center
EH

Elizabeth Hinton

Reference Librarian, Rowland Medical Library, University of Mississippi Medical Center
RK

Ramune K. Kubilius

Collection Development / Special Projects Librarian, Northwestern University, Galter Health Sciences Library
Longtime health sciences librarian, member of MLA (Medical Library Association), SLA (Special Libraries Association), also regional and state health sciences library organizations. Involved with Charleston Conference as a program director, conference dine-around host, and recruiter/compiler of conference session “And They Were There” reports for “Against the Grain” (ATG). Active in organizing conference's health sciences Lively Lunches... Read More →
avatar for David Parker

David Parker

VP, Editorial & Licensing, Alexander Street a ProQuest Company
David Parker is VP Editorial and Licensing for Alexander Street – the leading provider of video, multi-media databases and unique, curated content to the global university library market. Prior to his role with Alexander Street, David founded Business Expert Press and served as the President of Business Expert Press and its sister company, Momentum Press. BEP and MP specialize in applied, concise ebooks for advanced business and engineering... Read More →
TS

Taney Shondel

Senior Editor, Alexander Street Press, a ProQuest Company
GR

G. Randall Watts

Assistant Director for Resource Management, Medical University of South Carolina Library



Friday November 4, 2016 12:30pm - 2:00pm
39 Rue de Jean 39 John Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

'Rolling With the Times' Together: The Consortium in Today's Libraries
The leaders of the Western NC Library Network (WNCLN), comprised of Appalachian State University, Western Carolina University and the University of NC at Asheville, recently received an LSTA grant from the State Library of NC to conduct strategic planning to explore the future of their consortial arrangement. WNCLN has the opportunity to explore some of the overarching questions that consortia face in order to strengthen and improve its 30-year collaboration.

As part of that planning process, WNCLN leaders will lead a discussion and invite audience input of best practices, big ideas, national trends, and future directions in academic library consortia.

Some topics they will address are:

  • Libraries have long ago established that more can be achieved by working together than alone. How can this core value be sustained in today's environment of rapid change in higher education, libraries, the publishing industry, and technology? 

  • How can consortia enable libraries to develop long-term strategies for managing print across institutional boundaries and to leverage digital resources collectively? 

  • How are consortia collaborate most effectively over the wide spectrum of library services (acquisition, licensing, organization, storage, publication, digitization, discovery, creation, expertise, access and more)? With so many opportunities to collaborate, how does a consortium go about establishing its priorities?

  • In an environment of so many national, regional, and local consortia, how can so many collaborations successfully co-exist? How can we create environment of connections rather than competition?

  • How can effective consortial agreements be achieved with vendors in an environment where common goals are harder to establish and sustain?

Speakers
avatar for Leah Dunn

Leah Dunn

University Librarian, UNC Asheville
avatar for Farzaneh Razzaghi

Farzaneh Razzaghi

Dean of Libraries, Western Carolina University
Library space, strategic planning, marketing library services, staffing, reorganization, and tell me some library related humors.
MB

Mary Beth Reichel

Interim Dean of Libraries, Appalachian State University
avatar for Ben Shirley

Ben Shirley

Network Librarian, Western NC Library Network
Consortial Library Issues and Opportunities | Sierra Systems Management | Opensource Library Software



Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress Ballroom North, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Beyond Usage: Measuring the Value of Library Resources
Libraries and publishers rely more and more on usage data to evaluate content. However, there are other considerations beyond raw data; context is vital, and format and subject matter will be reflected in the numbers. This panel will present a range of perspectives and findings dealing with the challenges of usage analysis from a librarian at a large state university, a librarian from a small private university, a streaming video publisher, and a humanities aggregator. In libraries, COUNTER statistics reports play an important role in decisions but we'll also hear about the frustrations all libraries face in data analysis and the factors beyond just usage data that drive collection decisions. Libraries rely heavily on their discovery systems, but how can one measure the impact---good or bad---that a discovery system has on e-resource usage? How do existing metrics stack up for usage of non-traditional formats, and what are additional ways to consider the value of visual resources? How can publishers reconcile their goal of providing the best possible user experience with that of driving usage? This panel will encourage libraries and publishers to engage in a broader dialogue about measures of value. Bring your questions, tips, and experiences with usage data and join the conversation.

Moderators
avatar for Ann Snoeyenbos

Ann Snoeyenbos

Manager, International Sales and Special Markets, Project MUSE

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Brown

Elizabeth Brown

Manager, Publisher Relations, Project MUSE, Johns Hopkins University Press
avatar for Tom Humphrey

Tom Humphrey

COO, Kanopy
avatar for Elizabeth Siler

Elizabeth Siler

Collection Development Librarian, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Collection Development Librarian at UNC Charlotte. I am also Project Team member on the Mellon Funded Charlotte Initiative which focuses on the future of the Academic eBook Market. My presentations at Charleston this year, will focus mostly on usage statistics and how they can be used to help make collection decisions.



Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Bridging the Divide: Collaborating Across Departments to Improve Communication and Collections
Flat budgets, rising subscription rates, and the need to communicate the (bad) news to librarians and faculty are part of the academic library landscape. Additionally, our institution recently implemented Incentive Based Budgeting requiring financial transparency and demonstration of value to community stakeholders. Directors overseeing liaison librarians and collection management will share their perspectives on increasing collaborations across their respective departments in order to build a line of communication between their departments. This presentation and discussion will focus on the venues and mechanisms that facilitate a culture of librarians sharing information across departments about financial realities within the libraries and university and promote cooperative decision-making in challenging times. At the authors’ institution the increased communication has resulted in:

• liaison librarians better understanding budget constraints, usage statistics and collection challenges such as weeding for growth;
• collections/acquisitions librarians respecting their liaisons librarian colleagues’ subject expertise and relationship with faculty;
• data-driven decision-making tempered by knowledge of disciplines and faculty needs.

Attendees will learn the approaches that worked to foster communication and collaboration between the departments and the challenges the presenters faced as they worked to build trust and respect between the two groups. Audience members will also be asked to answer the following questions and share their experiences and departmental structures so that participants may learn of other successful collaborations:

• What methods have you used to facilitate interdepartmental communications between subject liaisons and collection management?
• Can you share examples of interdepartmental decision-making for collection-related decisions?

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Fawley

Nancy Fawley

Director, Information and Instruction Services, University of Vermont
Nancy Fawley is the Director of Information and Instruction Services at the University of Vermont’s Bailey/Howe Library. She is currently responsible for leading a department of liaison librarians in the programs and services they provide to support research and learning. From 2004-2011, she served as Head of User Services and then Interim Library Director at Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar where she initiated and developed integrated... Read More →
avatar for Laura Gewissler

Laura Gewissler

Director of Collection Management Services, University of Vermont
Laura Gewissler is the Director of Collection Management Services at the University of Vermont’s Bailey/Howe Library. She is currently responsible for coordination of collections, technical services, serials management and usage of remote storage. From 1988 to 2012, she served as Collection Development Librarian and eventually Director of Library Services at Georgian Court University Library in Lakewood, NJ. Prior to that she worked at... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Creating Subject Profiles: Combining the University's Academic Landscape with the Library Collection to Begin Conversations and Inform Future Based Decision Making
This presentation identifies the challenges faced and the strategies used to create this hybrid style document. By taking the concept of a traditional or standard collection development policy/statement in a different direction and enriching it with data curated from relevant sources, this subject profile style allows for interpreting the collection with a broader perspective. As a new Collection Strategist, collaborating with Subject Liaisons was part of this project. Preparing these documents was also a teachable moment for me, creating an opportunity for a deep dive into subject areas, collections and the users they serve. The content of these profiles was also intended to inform future decisions by the Collection Strategies Department and Library administration. A brief and concise subject profile could be the basis for conversations regarding materials selection as well being a point of departure for discussions regarding budgets, stakeholder needs and plans for physical library spaces.


Speakers
BF

Belen Fernandez

Collection Strategist, University of California, Davis


Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

How a New Library System Changed the Way We Think about Acquisitions and Collection Development
Franklin & Marshall College is a small undergraduate institution with a FTE of approximately 2,400 students. In the Summer of 2016 the library migrated to OCLC's Worldshare Management System (WMS). This change to a cloud-based library system gave us an opportunity to consider new ways of doing cataloging, circulation, and acquisitions. This presentation will primarily discuss the changes that were implemented to the allocation of funds for ordering materials and the impact of those changes, including the way we now approach collection development. Some Items that will be discussed:

Before WMS
  • The way materials had been ordered: 76 funds just for book purchases; departmental allocations with monthly budget reports; funds for librarians; a midyear reallocation of unspent funds; approval plans; and DDA for ebooks.

After WMS
  • The changes to the allocation structure will be discussed in detail: a smaller number of funds (16); no individual departmental allocations; 3 large book funds; one large fund for librarians; no midyear reallocation of funds; no monthly budget reports for departments.

We will also talk about the process that led us to consider these changes: new eyes looking at the acquisition process and the opportunity presented to us by WMS.

Initial assessment of the changes:
  • Feedback from faculty, librarians, staff (this was a radical change for some of our staff and users)
  • Is the new fund structure working?
  • Have the changes been beneficial to acquisitions workflows?
  • What's next?
  • Even fewer funds?
  • More subject-based approval plans?
  • More DDA or EBS plans for ebooks?

Discussion:
  • Sharing experiences with allocations, acquisitions workflows, and migration to new systems


Speakers
TK

Thomas Karel

Collection Management Librarian, Franklin & Marshall College
I have been an academic librarian for 37 years, working in reference, government documents, and collection development. Since 1995 I have also been an adjunct faculty member in Drexel University's library and information science program.
avatar for Bonnie Powers

Bonnie Powers

Content Services Librarian, Franklin & Marshall College
I have been the Content Services Librarian at Franklin & Marshall College since July 2015. Previously, I worked for public library systems for about 9 years as a cataloger and a district consultant. My very first library position was also at Franklin & Marshall College, about 13 years ago, when I worked for three years as a part-time cataloging assistant in the same department that I now lead. I have come full circle!



Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

How Do Libraries Make a Long Term, Substantial Commitment to Support OA Publishing?
Linked to "Rolling the Dice or Calculating a Bet? How to decide which OA project(s) to support," this session workshops a couple of related questions that bear on library operations in a possible future environment where most publications are open: 1) how do we model the transition of library budgets from purchasing content to supporting OA Publishing, and 2) OA as a collection development strategy--the practices of library collection development and management and the jobs associated with them and what they look like when most publications are OA. To prepare for the session, please see "Curating Collective Collections — Open Sesame: Collection Development at the Network Level", which appeared in the September 2016  (28:4, p. 87)  issue of Against the Grain.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Kieft

Robert Kieft

Librarian, Retired
Robert Kieft has worked at the libraries of Occidental College, Haverford College, and Stanford University. Retired from Occidental in the summer of 2015, he edits the "Curating Collective Collections" column in Against the Grain and continues to work with SCELC as a consultant on shared collections services. He has taken part in a number of grants and organizations on shared print projects over the last 15 years, most recently the HathiTrust... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

How to Play a More Active Role in Digital Humanities Research
In this session, we will discuss some of the difficulties and opportunities ahead of libraries seeking to provide robust tools and data to support text data mining and the growing number of courses that focus on or utilize Digital Humanities tools in the course of research.

Digital Humanities as a discipline is growing and evolving - even while many institutions struggle to define what the field actually means in a general sense and to them directly. The potential for deepening and increasing the amount of scholarly research and publishing through Digital Humanities programs is incalculable, and yet the starting point for institutionalizing this practice on campus is often elusive.

Providing the means and methods for interrogating available content and datasets - including locally sourced content - continues to be challenging, not only from the practical standpoint but from the process standpoint, too. What part can and do libraries play in helping drive the evolution and adoption of Digital Humanities across a campus? Where do the lines of intersection between library and lecture hall exist? In what ways can the library represent even stronger institutional value through the provision of rich historical constant and the resources with which to dissect them in more contextual and scientific ways?

Attendees will leave with an idea of how other libraries are actively supporting digital scholarship in the humanities as well as inspiration for how they can play a more active role in DH research at their own institution.

Speakers
BC

Bret Costain

New Product Strategy & Development, Gale Primary Sources, Gale, a part of Cengage Learning
AC

Angela Courtney

Head of Arts & Humanities, Head of Reference Services, Librarian for English & American Literature, Director of the Scholars' Commons, Librarian, Indiana University
avatar for Harriett Green

Harriett Green

English and Digital Humanities Librarian, University of Illinois
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Caroline Muglia

Caroline Muglia

Collection Assessment Librarian, University of Southern California
Assessment, evidence-based collection development.


Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Cypress Ballroom South, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Journey to the Center of a Digital Project: A Tour of Three New Tools for Next-Generation Digital Scholarship
As scholarship continues to go "digital," the urge to create new formats and broaden access has begun to trigger a series of changes to the bedrock of publishing business and infrastructure that will be needed to support this brave new world. How will authors and publishers understand their respective rights and responsibilities? How can publishers understand and communicate the costs associated with publishing long-form digital scholarship, often also made available Open Access, as well as traditional monographs? What platforms will be able to handle multi-modal works that may include a range of forms of media in addition to more traditional narrative forms?

In this interactive session, we will take the example of one new work of digital scholarship, A Mid-Republican House from Gabii, and use it as a case study to demonstrate these new tools in action from project initiation, through the process of forming it into a product ready for publication, considering its financial sustainability, and the final presentation format it will take.

The tools we will share, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, include
the Model Publishing Contract for Digital Scholarship (Emory and Michigan), the AAUP Digital Monograph P+L Tool, and Fulcrum, a publishing platform built on the Hydra/Fedora framework to support source materials for monographs (University of Michigan Press).

Authors, digital scholarship librarians, and publishers, join us! In the session, we will welcome and encourage discussion and feedback on ways to make these tools most useful as new use cases continue to emerge.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Macklin

Lisa Macklin

Director, Scholarly Communications Office, Emory University
Lisa A. Macklin is the director of the Scholarly Communications Office for Emory University Libraries. As both a librarian and a lawyer, Lisa focuses on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues, working with faculty and students on the application of copyright law to teaching, research, and scholarship. Her interests include transformations in scholarship and publishing, including new models of scholarship in digital form and... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Maron

Nancy Maron

President, BlueSky to BluePrint
Nancy works with publishers, librarians and other innovative project leaders to define, test and refine assumptions about new and existing products and services. She honed her skills in over 20 years of experience working at the nexus of publishing, higher education and technology, most recently with the not-for-profit organization Ithaka S+R, where she led the team focused on Sustainability and Scholarly Communications.
avatar for Kimberly Schmelzinger

Kimberly Schmelzinger

Founder, MeanLine Publisher Services
I am a consultant providing customized research solutions to scholarly publishers. Among other projects, I conduct research for the AAUP (for whom I prepare the AAUP Annual Statistics), and I have recently completed two projects funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, both related to estimating the cost of publishing a humanities monograph.
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Director, Press; Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan
Charles Watkinson is Associate University Librarian for Publishing at University of Michigan Libraries and Director of University of Michigan Press. Prior to moving to Michigan in 2014, Charles was Director of Purdue University Press and Head of Scholarly Publishing Services in Purdue Libraries for five years, and Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens for five years. He started in the book business working for Oxbow... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Marketing Your Collections: Which Strategies Actually Work?
Having licensed or purchased those expensive electronic resources, you want to make sure that your students & faculty know about them -- but what's the best way to do so? Three similar-sized universities (Santa Clara University, the University of San Francisco, Loyola Marymount University) took on a comparative study with Springer Nature to explore the impact of proactive (having an event staffed by an expert from the vendor) versus indirect (email campaigns & digital signage) campaigns for a suite of Springer Nature products, with the third university changing nothing to act as a control group. We will discuss idea development, methodology, and findings to date - how use of the targeted Springer Nature products has been impacted by different kinds of marketing campaigns - as well as implications for marketing other kinds of electronic resources based on this prototype.

Speakers
DA

Daniel Ascher

Account Development Specialist, Springer Nature
avatar for Jamie Hazlitt

Jamie Hazlitt

Librarian for Collection Development and Evaluation, Loyola Marymount University
avatar for Erika Johnson

Erika Johnson

Head of Acquisitions and Collection Management, University of San Francisco
Before joining the University of San Francisco, I was the Electronic Resources Librarian at Boston College. Previous work lives also include Acquisitions & Serials Librarian at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and Program Officer for the American Library Association. I received a B.A. in French and International Relations from UW - Madison and my MLIS from UW - Milwaukee. My current interests include investigating new liaison... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth McKeigue

Elizabeth McKeigue

Associate University Librarian, Santa Clara University
Elizabeth McKeigue is the Associate University Librarian for Learning & Engagement at Santa Clara University in California. In this role, she oversees activities related to research, teaching, outreach, assessment, and access & delivery services. Prior to 2010, Ms. McKeigue held positions at Harvard University, including Head of Circulation for Widener Library and Coordinator of Reference Services for Widener & Lamont Libraries. Ms. McKeigue... Read More →



Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Moving from Reclaiming to Reclaimed: The Big Picture and a Case Study of a Trending Initiative
66% — that’s how many libraries claim space reclamation as a priority according to the early findings of a recent ProQuest survey. 55% of these libraries have spent the last five years or more focusing on space reclamation, putting our industry at an interesting crossroads: while many of our peers are in the planning stage, many others are in the thick of the redevelopment stage.

During this lively lunch, we’ll explore all aspects of this trending initiative, discussing the big picture presented by the findings of ProQuest’s survey, the specifics of what made space reclamation projects work—or not work—for a few individual libraries and what all of this means for users’ evolving expectations of the virtual experiences offered by their libraries. Through informal surveys and open-ended discussion questions inspired by the aforementioned survey's findings, we’ll facilitate continuation of a conversation that many librarians are having on a smaller scale. Attendees will leave with a better idea of how to introduce—or continue to strategically support—this space reclamation initiatives at their own libraries. Participation will be encouraged through online polls and surveys throughout the presentation.

Speakers
MB

Miri Botzer

Product Manager, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
BH

Bobby Hollandsworth

Learning Commons and Digital Studio Coordinator, Clemson University Libraries
Bobby Hollandsworth is the Learning Commons and Digital Studio Coordinator, Business Reference Librarian, and RefWorks Administrator at RM Cooper Library on the campus of Clemson University. He serves as the library liaison to the departments of Economics, Finance, Agribusiness, and Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management.
KS

Kevin Stehr

VP, North America Sales, ProQuest



Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom A, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Moving the Library: Bringing Resources to Students

In keeping with the theme of roll with the times, I propose a panel session describing the need to move the library by bringing library resources, and access to a librarian, into course management systems. I propose a panel session format. A community college librarian will speak on her experience as an embedded librarian, the creator of a one credit online course on information literacy, and marketing library resources in the CMS. A representative from Gale will speak on how to promote and market the library’s online resources in the CMS. A university librarian will speak on creating an online community in Blackboard and mention an online site that integrates library instruction materials into Canvas courses. Topics discussed will include LibGuides, links to streaming video collections, embedded librarian programs, creating online courses on information literacy, and developing a suite of online information literacy modules. The audience will be asked to share examples of ways they move the library’s resources to students. Participants will be asked to share responses to various questions via texting to an online poll.


Speakers
avatar for Karen Malnati

Karen Malnati

Acquisitions Librarian, Union County College
SS

Steven Sharpiro

Electronic Resources Librarian, Library Administration, Montclair State University
avatar for Sara Tarpley

Sara Tarpley

Director, Academic Product Sales, Gale Cengage Learning



Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Carolina Ballroom B, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Peer Review of Longform Scholarship, Now and Into the Future
This Lively Lunch Discussion will focus on the current and future state of peer review for long form scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. The launching off point for the discussion will be the recent publication of the Best Practices in Peer Review handbook, released this year by the Association of American University Presses (AAUP), which gives a snapshot of university press standards. After a presentation of the handbook and the role it can serve for current and newly developing presses, including those emerging from within university libraries, the panel will move on to discuss the value of this process in an ever-changing scholarly publishing eco-system. Donna Dixon will discuss how peer review has worked at the growing “open textbook” programs at universities, while Becky Brasington Clark will present on efforts to conduct peer review more openly.

Questions considered include: how do libraries see peer review? How might peer review change to accommodate new forms of scholarship, digital and otherwise? How can we best denote when a rigorous peer review process is in place?

Speakers
BB

Becky Brasington Clark

Director of Publishing, Library of Congress
avatar for Donna Dixon

Donna Dixon

Co-Director, SUNY Press
Co-director and production manager at SUNY Press, former director of member services at Nylink, and librarian. Interested in library acquisitions and collection management (e and p), scholarly and trade publishing, and open access.
avatar for Brian Halley

Brian Halley

Senior Editor, University of Massachusetts Press
I am Senior Editor at the UMass Press and a Board Member of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP). I'm interested in talking to library folks about publishing.


Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Releasing Subject Liaisons into the Wild: Designing a Holistic Collection Development Approach
Library literature is replete with recommendations and examples of engaging subject liaisons in the research and curricular process by freeing them from traditional library collection-building duties. At the University of Virginia Library, a recent reorganization has resulted in the formation of a Collections Management Team to create a holistic, agile, and balanced approach to collections-related activities. This new approach to collection development and management was designed with the intent to reimagine and redirect a large number of "siloed" approval plans, re-envision interdisciplinary collection support, streamline "slip" plans through the development of new print and e-book PDA plans, and redesign the allocation models to maintain these new initiatives.

This session will provide insight into the processes and stages of designing a new approach to collection management at the University of Virginia Library. Presenters will discuss the process of creating new, interdisciplinary plans, planning for the financial allocations to support the new approaches, and perspectives from the Library's vendor collections consultant (ProQuest/Coutts). The presenters will share experiences and lessons-learned from the first year of this initiative and make suggestions for others considering similar changes to their collection management strategies as academic libraries design new approaches to roll with the times.

Audience members will be invited to participate and discuss their experiences and priorities related to changing approaches to collection management.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Lynn Kingston

Mary Lynn Kingston

Manager, Coutts Collection Consultants, ProQuest
avatar for Carla Lee

Carla Lee

Interim Senior Director, Harrison-Small Research Center, University of Virginia


Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Citadel Green Room, Embassy Suites 337 Meeting St, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

Roll With Us: Library and Publisher Collaborations
The growth in collaborations between libraries and publishers for e-resources projects signal a desire to challenge and complement long established roles. What types of innovative collaborations are being explored to further e-resources growth? What opportunities will these collaborations offer? How can they benefit both libraries and publishers?

This lively lunch will feature discussions about library and publisher partnerships on topics such as: print and e-resources backfile consolidation, demand-driven access, collaboration for course and program support, and library marketing assistance.

Do you have an innovative collaboration to share? Please join us. Ideas and examples from this session will be shared in the Library Technology Innovation series.

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Cooper

Natasha Cooper

Collection Development and Analysis Librarian and Subject Librarian for Information Studies, Syracuse University Libraries
Tasha Cooper is collection development and analysis librarian for arts and humanities, as well as some social sciences and professional programs, and subject librarian for information studies at Syracuse University Libraries, in Syracuse, NY.
avatar for John Lavender

John Lavender

Consultant, Lavender Consulting/Maverick Publishing Specialists
Lavender-Consulting is run by John Lavender, a publisher with almost 40 years' experience in academic and scientific publishing. John has worked with books, databases and journals, and in editorial, sales, marketing, electronic content and delivery, business development and in negotiating. John is also a Senior Associate with Maverick Publishing Specialists who provide strategic consulting and operational outsource services for the publishing... Read More →
avatar for Jaclyn Ricords

Jaclyn Ricords

E-Resources and Consortia Relations Manager, IGI Global
Jackie Ricords leads IGI Global’s e-resources and consortia outreach efforts. Prior to joining the STM publisher, she worked in higher education for more than a decade teaching and directing professional development programs for educators. Jackie has expertise in digital resources, with special interest in e-publishing and online learning. In collaboration with industry leaders, she facilitated the development of a series of information and... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:45pm

Rolling the Dice: Betting on the Necessary KSA for Future Collection Development Librarians
Collection Development is a standard course taught in LIS programs across the country but without any real "standards" of what we should be teaching. This lunch discussion section will be facilitated by LIS educators and trainers who want to engage the audience in a thoughtful conversation about how we need to prepare librarians (through LIS programs and continuing education) to navigate the shifting landscape that is collection development. As new issues emerge in the field (ownership vs access, standing orders vs Evidence-Based Acquisitions models, etc), we need to re-evaluate the curriculum and decide what should stay and what should go. All stakeholders from content creators and providers to future librarians have a vested interest in making sure librarians are prepared to develop and maintain collections.

During the discussion audience members will be given notecards with collection development topics currently addressed in LIS education as well as blank notecards for the participants to add topics. After quickly touching on some of the issues, needs, and constraints we face as educators we will ask the participants to work at their tables on prioritizing content areas and then opening those up to discussion by the larger group. The attendees will be able to identify and prioritize which knowledge, skills, and abilities collection development librarians need. Their feedback will be incorporated into the curriculum used by the presenters and shared with other LIS educators in the hope of collaboratively shaping the future of LIS education.

Speakers
AB

Anne Barnhart

Head of Instructional Services, University of West Georgia
avatar for Kristi Chadwick

Kristi Chadwick

Consultant, Massachusetts Library System
BT

Barry Trott

Special Projects Director, Williamsburg Regional Library
I am the editor of Reference and User Services Quarterly, and am interested in scholarly publishing, readers' advisory, linked data, discovery, reference work, collection development, intellectual freedom, and copyright among other things.


Friday November 4, 2016 12:45pm - 2:00pm
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:45pm

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